#1
I can't for the life of me figure out how to get from key Emin to key A harmonic minor and vice versa. I am really new to music theory, so if anyone could please clearly explain how this is done (or of it cant be done, why not?)

thanks in advance
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2) Set it from English to Vietnamese
3) Type "Will Justin Bieber ever hit puberty"
4) Translate
5) Copy the Vietnamese text
6) Translate back from Vietnamese to English
7) ???
8) Profit!

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#2
For a start the key is A minor. A harmonic minor is a scale you can opt to play in A minor.

To address your question a use of V7s will be your friend here. So set up your progression in Em, then hit an E7 at some point and play your progression in A minor. Play a B7 to transition back to Em. That's a simple but effective way to modulate between the two.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
oh i see. thanks, i'll go try that
1) Open Google Translator
2) Set it from English to Vietnamese
3) Type "Will Justin Bieber ever hit puberty"
4) Translate
5) Copy the Vietnamese text
6) Translate back from Vietnamese to English
7) ???
8) Profit!

ಠ~ಠ ಠoಠ ಠxಠ ಠ.ಠ ಥ_ಥ ಠ_ಠ
#4
Quote by AlanHB
For a start the key is A minor. A harmonic minor is a scale you can opt to play in A minor.

To address your question a use of V7s will be your friend here. So set up your progression in Em, then hit an E7 at some point and play your progression in A minor. Play a B7 to transition back to Em. That's a simple but effective way to modulate between the two.


Do you mind explaining for the sake of educational purpose ?
cheers
Gear:

Charvel So-Cal Style 1 HH
Jackson Pro Series RR24M
Dean Dave Mustaine Signature VMNT

JCM 2000 TSL 100
#5
^The V7 is a dominant function chord. Dominant function is a function in which there is a tritone present (or the implication of a tritone) that resolves by step motion. Usually it means 7-4 (for example B-F in C) resolving to 8-3 (C-E in C major). The function of the dominant function is to lead back to a tonic. So if you want to create a new tonic (i.e. modulate) then you can take the dominant function of that new tonic and bob's your uncle.

So if you're in E minor and want to get to A minor then an easy way to do it is just find a chord with the 4th degree of the new key and the leading tone of the new key, which in this case is D and G# respectively. Notice how that creates a tritone, and how if you go 4-3 and 7-8 you end up with C and A, the two important notes of the new tonic chord. The obvious choice for a dominant function chord is the chord built off of the dominant scale degree, in this case E (for A minor). So a chord built off of E, with a G# and a D.

E G# B (just for good measure) D. Or, and E7 chord.

I hope that was more or less clear. You kind of just asked "what is theory."
#6
Awesome, thank you.

I know theory, its just this concept is new to me.

Thanks.
Gear:

Charvel So-Cal Style 1 HH
Jackson Pro Series RR24M
Dean Dave Mustaine Signature VMNT

JCM 2000 TSL 100
#7
Is it not just tritone substitutions?
Gear:

Charvel So-Cal Style 1 HH
Jackson Pro Series RR24M
Dean Dave Mustaine Signature VMNT

JCM 2000 TSL 100
#8
No, a tritone sub is when you have the same tritone in two different chords. Most commonly V7 and bII7. For example, in C major, G7 has the notes G-B-D-F, with a tritone between B and F and Db7 has the notes Db-F-Ab-Cb with the tritone F-Cb (enharmonically the same as B). They have the same tritone, so they can serve the same dominant function.
#9
This could be extended to a iim7b5 V7 i.e Bm7b5, E7, Am.

A basic minor ii V i, of course.

Alternatively:

Bm7b5, Bb7, Am


Bm7b5, Fm7, Bb7, Am

etc etc


Alternatively, use superior mind powers to contact Zoltar, God of theory, ruler of Io and Ganymede, satellites of Jupiter, where he resides on tuesdays and the occasional bank holiday. Zoltar's main interests include hyper-spectralism as exemplified by Dumitrescu and Radulescu. Aside from this, he does like an occasional happy meal.

Hail Zoltar!
#10
Alternatively, use superior mind powers to contact Zoltar, God of theory, ruler of Io and Ganymede, satellites of Jupiter, where he resides on tuesdays and the occasional bank holiday. Zoltar's main interests include hyper-spectralism as exemplified by Dumitrescu and Radulescu. Aside from this, he does like an occasional happy meal.

Hail Zoltar!


I lost my shit.

I don't know who you are, but that was amazing.

E minor is only two notes away from A harmonic minor, so first off, add a flat to the key signature of E minor to get to A minor. Adding a flat moves the tonic up by a fourth.

So, E minor has 1 sharp, which is F#. Naturalize the F, essentially, as flats cancel sharps and vise versa, and you end up in A minor. Raise the 7th Degree, which is G, to G# and you are now in A harmonic minor.

For example, do a progression strictly in E minor, play an F Major chord or any chord still containing notes from E minor while still using F. Play a chord shared between E minor and A minor, such as, I dunno, A minor.

And then utilize the raised 7th by playing E major. Thats one way to modulate.
#11
Quote by bartnijman
I can't for the life of me figure out how to get from key Emin to key A harmonic minor and vice versa. I am really new to music theory, so if anyone could please clearly explain how this is done (or of it cant be done, why not?)

thanks in advance

SD's are the way to go, but also, these two keys are adjacent on the Circle of Fifths, so you could quite easily use pivot chord modulation, rather than direct modulation if you wanted.

Below I've used both.
---------
-8-8-6-5-5
-7-9-7-4-5
-9-9-7-2-5
-7-------
---8-7-4-5

Em - C - Bm7b5 - E/G sharp - Am.
#12
The way I'd explain it (pretty much the same as above) is the V7 - I/i cadence is so strong that it can even "force" modulations.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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