#1
I've just had a band practice and I kept getting electric shocks.
I had been using an italia all the practice but then I switched to my Ashton and after 10 or so mins of using it I got shocks! First from the strings, I thought it was a cut but it kept happening and then my friends touched it and it buzzed but didn't hurt them.
I turned of my amp and it still happened but didn't feel as strong so after about 5 mins I turned it back on and I touch a cable connected to a completely different guitar and that socked me, it kept happening, I thought that it was coming from my Ashton guitar so I switched it and picked up my Itailia and it felt fine but I bent over to change a setting on a sound box and my knee got shocked, my friends touched my knee and it was burning hot compared to the other.
Could it be the amp? Only I got both my Italia and Amp after Christmas and they were both brand new.
Please help soon.
#2
I have a Italia Mondial Classic and a Fender Frontman 212r and I was using a £20 cable
#3
Maybe a ground wire in the amp/cable. Use a different cable first, if not, get your amp serviced.
#4
Quote by AJScott
Maybe a ground wire in the amp/cable. Use a different cable first, if not, get your amp serviced.
I got the cable a week ago, and I got a shock from a differnt wire connected to a different guitar.
The amp said it came fully serviced.
#5
What you're describing sounds like the amp power cable is, "out of phase"

There are 3 wires inside the power cable. A ground, (green), which is probably OK, a white, (the "common" or "neutral", and a black, (the "hot" wire). If the black and white wires are reversed with respect to another amp, (or anything connected to it), you will get "lit up", big time.

Keith Richards was knocked out cold on stage from an out of phase microphone.

Back in the day, some amps had a "phase switch" on the back, ostensibly for matching, and lowest hum. I think that's pretty much, if not totally eliminated, and now power cord interlock cables are a mandatory standard.

Another possibility, (more possible if yours is a tube amp), is high voltage leaking from the power supply capacitors to ground.

It is possible for your amp to be "out of phase", possibly by virtue of an assembly error. Keep in mind that because the AC is converted to DC by the power supply, the input polarity doesn't matter, and the amp would work fine, even if the connections were reversed.

An open or disconnected ground is another possibility.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 22, 2012,
#6
Quote by Captaincranky
What you're describing sounds like the amp power cable is, "out of phase"

There are 3 wires inside the power cable. A ground, (green), which is probably OK, a white, (the "common" or "neutral", and a black, (the "hot" wire). If the black and white wires are reversed with respect to another amp, (or anything connected to it), you will get "lit up", big time.

Keith Richards was knocked out cold on stage from an out of phase microphone.

Back in the day, some amps had a "phase switch" on the back, ostensibly for matching, and lowest hum. I think that's pretty much, if not totally eliminated, and now power cord interlock cables are a mandatory standard.

Another possibility, (more possible if yours is a tube amp), is high voltage leaking from the power supply capacitors to ground.

It is possible for your amp to be "out of phase", possibly by virtue of an assembly error. Keep in mind that because the AC is converted to DC by the power supply, the input polarity doesn't matter, and the amp would work fine, even if the connections were reversed.

An open or disconnected ground is another possibility.

Okay this is very interesting thanks.