#1
My band are thinking of recording some of our tunes, but, being students, we can't afford to rent out a studio. What is the cheapest way of getting a decent quality recording done???

Ta.
#2
Probably something like a digital personal recorder. Won't sound fantastic but you can just use it to record the room and as long as you make sure the levels are set right it should be ok.
EH


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#3
To record yourself you'll either need an interface to hook up to your PC & the necessary software or alternatively you could get a multitracker.

Interface/PC/Software is often cheaper to get started and provides more flexibility so as budget is a concern for you, this could probably be the most relevant option. I presume you already have a decent spec PC to use?

Multitrackers offer all the same basic functionality as software and are easier to use, but they are often more expensive to get started and if you don't get one with enough tracks, you can find them limiting.
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#4
Try to get some decent multitrack recording software for a cheap price. Get a decent Mic, like an SM57 to start with and learn the basics of recording. Drums are another thing. but can be done with software like EZDrummer for basic EP's.
#5
it's a cost/quality thing. for the $$ you're better off using the money you'd spend on gear to pay someone who has the gear and the know-how
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#6
Well, I don't know about your budget, but look into getting an audio interface maybe? A lot of them come bundled with software like Cubase LE, and if you have a laptop you can essentially use it as a basic portable studio...of sorts :P I am using an Alesis io2 express interface with Cubase 5 installed on my laptop, but it came bundled with Cubase LE 5, which was more than enough for recording a band with.
#7
Quote by fastlanestoner
it's a cost/quality thing. for the $$ you're better off using the money you'd spend on gear to pay someone who has the gear and the know-how

+1 to this. A lot of people now days think they can spend a few hundred dollars on a recording setup and get professional results, while this is true if you have the experience, someone just starting out is likely to have pretty horrid mixes for a year or two, just learning how to use everything.

I'm not saying getting your own gear isn't a good idea, but if you're wanting to record an EP, without an experience, you're much better off paying a professional a modest price, and leaving the production in their hands, and the performance in yours.
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#8
I've pretty much found myself in the same situation, wanting to try some home recording on a very limited budget, and am finding it really difficult so will be following this thread with great interest and hopefully the advice will come flooding in.

So far, all I've managed to do is go upstairs in my room with my iPhone, recording my chords as a 'note', then transferring it to iTunes, then creating an .mp3 version, and then importing it into REAPER.

In reaper then adding some effects - don't really know what I'm doing though

Then, I'll play the chords through Reaper, using my headphones, and then set my iPhone to record another note which is the lead, then do the same by turning it into an mp3, and importing that and messing around with some effects.

Then, if I'm feeling brave, I'll play the chords, and lead together through Reaper, set my iPhone to record another note, and do the vocals.

Pop the vocals into Reaper, mess around for a while, then I've got all three playing as something that possibly resembles, in the loosest sense of the word, a song.

My stunning list of equipment consists of:

1 x iPhone
1 x semi-knackered laptop struggling to run Reaper
1 x guitar
1 x voice

Now that's BUDGET ! (and also poor in terms of quality, and production knowledge).
#9
Quote by MatrixClaw
+1 to this. A lot of people now days think they can spend a few hundred dollars on a recording setup and get professional results, while this is true if you have the experience, someone just starting out is likely to have pretty horrid mixes for a year or two, just learning how to use everything.

I'm not saying getting your own gear isn't a good idea, but if you're wanting to record an EP, without an experience, you're much better off paying a professional a modest price, and leaving the production in their hands, and the performance in yours.

+1

couldn't aree more. A lot of people seem to think that buying awesome equipment means your recording will sound awesome. Most of the quality actually comes from knowledge and experience with recording and mixing. Using the money that you would spend on gear to hire someone is is experienced and knowledgeable is probably the best way to go.

Now, if you're dead set on recording yourself, I would invest in an audio interface. Like stated, bundle packages can be purchased, which usually include an interface and software. Some also have a mic, cable, and stand with them. Spend lots of time familiarizing yourself with your equipment and placing the mics in just the right place.
#10
i use an maudio 1010lt soundcard which was 200$ with an sm57 which was 79$ when i bought it. with just those two items i get a decent enough sound for my tastes.
for a sample of what i've done with that setup check out my songs: http://www.youtube.com/user/GrimsonGhost

although, if you're gonna take my route you will need a good drum sim like superior drummer 2 which you can probably try out temporarily to see if you like it.
#11
Quote by chaosmoon
+1

couldn't aree more. A lot of people seem to think that buying awesome equipment means your recording will sound awesome. Most of the quality actually comes from knowledge and experience with recording and mixing. Using the money that you would spend on gear to hire someone is is experienced and knowledgeable is probably the best way to go.

Now, if you're dead set on recording yourself, I would invest in an audio interface. Like stated, bundle packages can be purchased, which usually include an interface and software. Some also have a mic, cable, and stand with them. Spend lots of time familiarizing yourself with your equipment and placing the mics in just the right place.


Agreed. I've been doing some recording for almost two years now. I haven't really had the proper equipment so far. I feel like I'm getting better with what I have, but nowhere near good professional quality. You can find studios that'll do work for $20-$30 an hour, at least around here anyway, that will give you good quality. If you have your songs down tight that will help save money. It just all depends on your budget. It would be great to get your own equipment and start learning, but remember if your demo doesn't sound of good quality then it will be easily over looked.