#1
I'm going to put in for RGT grade 7/8 in summer and you have to know lots of altered chords: m7#5, m7b9,m7b5b9, m7#5#9, 7b5, 7#5, 7b9, 7#9, 7b5b9, 7#5#9..

I already know the common voicings for most of the chords but I'm just wondering if anyone has any interesting voicings for them that they'd care to share. The ones given in the hand book are kinda crappy as usual with RGT..

Cheers.
#2
Try going to all-guitar-chords. com, (without the space) thats where I go to find chord shapes.
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#3
I was wondering where this post went!

Anyway, here's a basic chart of what you could do to get the most 'basic' inversions:

(Em7#5)	|        |  1st     | 2nd  |3rd  |	

|----\	|-3----------8--------10-----12---|
|-8---\	|-3----------5--------8------13---|
|-7----\|-5----------7--------9------12---|
|-10---/|-2----------5--------10-----12---|
|-7---/	|---------------------------------|
|----/	|---------------------------------|


If you apply this to the chords you want to know and write them down (or write down the notes beforehand as a mental training, that's cool too) in a way that makes sense to you, you'll understand them in no time flat.
Of course, there's a lot more voicings to be found across different string-'groups', string skippings and open strings. As I said in the earlier thread... Get cracking!

Last edited by Y00p at Jan 23, 2012,
#4
Quote by Y00p
I was wondering where this post went!

Anyway, here's a basic chart of what you could do to get the most 'basic' inversions:

(Em7#5)	|1st inv.|  2nd     | 3rd   |4th  |	

|----\ |-3----------8--------10-----12---|
|-8---\ |-3----------5--------8------13---|
|-7----\|-5----------7--------9------12---|
|-10---/|-2----------5--------10-----12---|
|-7---/ |---------------------------------|
|----/ |---------------------------------|


If you apply this to the chords you want to know and write them down (or write down the notes beforehand as a mental training, that's cool too) in a way that makes sense to you, you'll understand them in no time flat.
Of course, there's a lot more voicings to be found across different string-'groups', string skippings and open strings. As I said in the earlier thread... Get cracking!



Haha yeah, it made more sense to put it in musician talk. Cheers for the help man.
I've got about 6 months till the exam so I should almost definitely have it nailed by then
#5
what

i don't understand why so many people throw out voicings for people, that defeats the purposes of knowing the chord.

ts, construct the chords and voicings yourself. don't be lazy.
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#6
Quote by Hail
what

i don't understand why so many people throw out voicings for people, that defeats the purposes of knowing the chord.

ts, construct the chords and voicings yourself. don't be lazy.

Which is exactly why I didn't give him all of it, but instead showed one of the many ways to find them... I said exactly the same as you, in the first version of this thread.
#7
Quote by Hail
what

i don't understand why so many people throw out voicings for people, that defeats the purposes of knowing the chord.

ts, construct the chords and voicings yourself. don't be lazy.



I do already "know" the chords, I doubt my tutor would advise me to do grade 8 if I didn't even understand chord construction.

Of course, your suggestion (creating my own voicings) is the 'best' way to learn things but I'm interested in other peoples ideas and a little bit of extra input is never a bad thing.
Last edited by anonimau5 at Jan 22, 2012,
#8
look up what we call Drop voicings, Drop 2 3 and 4. They are named for the SATB setup of a chord. So if you are playing a Cmaj7 chord, and it goes C(low) E G B(high) the C is 4(Bass) and the B is 1(Soprano). Dropped voicings can be done to any inverted chord, and will also have 4 different types of chords themselves. So taking that C chord, if you wanted to play a Drop 2 voicing of that chord, which is in root position, you would put the G in the bass. Drop 3s are the same just the 3rd note is what you put in the bass.

It sounds confusing but they can come in handy when comping, and you can do it to all those chords you have to learn.
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#9
Quote by Y00p
I was wondering where this post went!

Anyway, here's a basic chart of what you could do to get the most 'basic' inversions:

(Em7#5)	|1st inv.|  2nd     | 3rd   |4th  |	

|----\ |-3----------8--------10-----12---|
|-8---\ |-3----------5--------8------13---|
|-7----\|-5----------7--------9------12---|
|-10---/|-2----------5--------10-----12---|
|-7---/ |---------------------------------|
|----/ |---------------------------------|


You did mean to shift the chord symbols along, right? No 4th inversion.

So you have there,

Form 3
Form 2
Form 1
Form 4

All Drop 2's.
#10
You're completely right, that's exactly what I wanted to say. Good catch!

TS, I hope you didn't write up ten charts based on that.