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#1
How often do you need 24 frets? Im looking at either some Les Paul or an Ibanez RG32.
I play all sorts of music. Do I need 24 frets? In metal solos? I have looked at a Les Paul Prophecy EX the Ibanez RG32 for 24 frets or some other 22 fret Les Paul, like the Standard or Traditional Pro.
#2
I never feel i'm missing out with 22, but if you're gonna use them then they'd be worth having
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#3
Well i wouldnt say you "need" it, though it does have a wider range. I do metal solos on both my guitars, both 22 frets, and I have no need for a 24 fret. But thats just me!
#4
I don't need a 24, even my 21 fret Tele works fine for me. It really depends on if you need them and want them.
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#5
It's only 2 extra notes. The chances of actually needing them are extremely slim.

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#6
It isn't the biggest problem in the world but it can sometimes be a nuisance especially if you are used to having 24 frets. You sometimes start to sort of expect the extras frets to be there.
#7
I have never, ever used the 24th fret. The advantage of having a 24 fret guitar is the fact that usually, the 22nd fret is easier accessible compared to 22-fret guitars. This depends on the guitar shape, scale length, fret size... Just play the guitar and see how it feels, there really is no definitive answer...

For example, I've got a 24 fret Jackson atm. The 24th fret is pretty much inaccessible, but I don't use it anyway so I don't care.
#8
I like having 24 frets because I feel like I have a complete "set". As in 12 notes at the left and its 12 octaves at the right. Makes learning the notes easier IMO even though its just a 2 fret difference.
#9
ok. Like I said I looked at a Prophecy EX (only LP with 24 frets?) and I guess the 22 frets is easier to reach on that. So I guess that would be an advantage over the standard LP.
#10
Well, :/ You can always learn to be a beast at bending and instead of playing the 24th fret bend the 22nd two notes higher and end of story? I'm used to doing it already on my telecaster when playing some Petrucci >,< It kills your fingers but at the same time helps you get a little better...
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#11
I prefer 24 frets. Even if you don't use it often, it's good to have it there for when you do need it. Quite a few songs I've learned have used the 24th fret, and I play mostly metal.
#12
I don't need 24 frets, I don't really use the highest frets that much, cause my solos don't really hit the highest notes, 18-20 occasionally. I mostly stay between 0 and 15.
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#13
24 fret is easier to get high fret access, but if you look for tone in neck pickup, gotta use 22. Also, people even use 20 frets on some hollow bodies just to have warmer and better tone. So we can say that 24th fret is not good for neck pickup. Or you can use single sized humbuckers like joe satriani. But well, go for a les paul standard, or either plus top if you can. Taditional pro has alnico 2 humbuckers which you wouldn't get to make any metal solos or harmonics. And if you can, go for higher end epiphones. Like zakk wylde. I recommend you saving more money.

Edit: Btw I love 24 frets, since i can play blues between only 21st and 24th frets, so it is funny. But would still go for a les paul.
Last edited by cemges at Jan 22, 2012,
#14
personally i love having that high E, the extra range is really useful.
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#15
I got a LP prophecy EX and it's really unconfortable to reach the 23-24th frets.
And i think you can play all that you want on 22 frets
#17
I get this feeling that I'm missing something when I'm playing my 22-fret Strat(though that could be because from the 15th fret up there's all kinds of dead frets, so I can't really play past it reliably), but I don't think I've ever gone past the 22nd fret more than once or twice. And...well, Malmsteen uses 21 frets IIRC(he might use 22, definitely doesn't use 24), he certainly has no problem doing metal solos. xD Pick what feels best to you, the number of frets isn't a big issue!
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#18
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#19
24 frets are absolutely essential for me. I increasingly find that 27 frets would be more useful. It depends on what you play as to whether 24 frets are necessary. No-one can answer that but yourself, really.
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#20
24 Frets? 21 for me, so I can get the right sound from the neck pickup.
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#21
Quote by Dayn
It depends on what you play as to whether 24 frets are necessary. No-one can answer that but yourself, really.


This, as you can obviously see from the mixed responses. But in general, it'll be quite unlikely that you'll come across a song that needs the 20-24 frets.

The only one that I've encountered (that I know the tabs of) is the Constant Motion solo.
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#22
In fact, all you miss on a 22 fret are two notes, because the 23-24 frets note on all the five lower strings are playable on the higher strings. Peronnaly, i dont need them, but i just feel safer having two full octaves. the guitar just feels fuller.
#23
It all depends on what you want to play, sometimes you really need those 2 extra frets. I found that my solo playing got better after I got 24 frets somehow my brain needed that.
And if you tune down a whole step (D)you still have the high end range of a 22 fret neck so you can play songs in D and E without having to retune. I also have a 27 fret guitar and with that in D I can still hit an high E, that is very cool even if the need is very seldom.
So if you play a very wide range of music it helps to have a guitar that is flexible.
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#26
Personally, I like having 24 because it puts the neck pup a little farther back and gives a little bit more attack when using it, which is nice for articulation. I don't often use the 24th fret, but it's nice to haven.
#27
I do need 24, for my metal stuff at least, I may not play the 24th, in a manner of speaking. I mostly use it in a whole "Sweep-tap-sweep" manner. I rarely actually pick anything past the 20th fret, mostly, use the last 3 just as notes to tap to complete a sweep or something. I do want them, unless it's a guitar not for metal (technical/death and whatnot), than I won't bother if it doesn't have 24.
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#28
Herman Li only uses 22 frets on his signature Ibanez, if that's of any use to you
#29
It really depends on the material you will be playing and the notes you want to be hitting in the high register. If you bend up a full tone on a 22 fret guitar then 'E' is no fuss. If you want to hit 'F' or 'F#' then you can get there but there's always the chance the high E string will pop on you when you are pushing them that bit harder in a 2 step bend like that but if you aren't needing to get up to these notes with the material you are playing then it's not a worry really and 22 frets will be fine.
#30
The most frets I have on a guitar is 22 and I don't have a problem with it. I also have one guitar with only 20 frets and I get by just fine with that I rarely go past the 15-17th frets anyway.
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#31
Quote by cemges
24 fret is easier to get high fret access, but if you look for tone in neck pickup, gotta use 22. Also, people even use 20 frets on some hollow bodies just to have warmer and better tone. So we can say that 24th fret is not good for neck pickup. Or you can use single sized humbuckers like joe satriani.


That's not true. The neck pickup is in a different place for different guitars. SGs and Flying Vs don't have their neck pickups right next to the neck like Les Pauls or Explorers. You could probably put 24 frets on them without changing pickup location. Fender Jaguars and Mustangs have their neck pickups pretty far back. No Fender has its neck pickup as far forward as possible. And hollowbodies have less frets so they can have a bigger body for resonance. It's not for "better" tone. It's different but you can't say one is better or worse.
#32
Like said, it depends entirely on the player as to whether you need those extra frets or not. It will also affect the neck pickup position - but again it's down to preference which position is better for it.

I've gotten used to having 24 frets on my Jackson, and even though I barely use the top few it feels weird playing on a guitar with less than 24 - it feels like there's frets missing that ought to be there.
#33
Quote by ville525
How often do you need 24 frets? Im looking at either some Les Paul or an Ibanez RG32.
I play all sorts of music. Do I need 24 frets? In metal solos? I have looked at a Les Paul Prophecy EX the Ibanez RG32 for 24 frets or some other 22 fret Les Paul, like the Standard or Traditional Pro.


I rarely *need* 24 frets, but I generally prefer guitars that have them.
Part of the reason is that it generally (but not always) follows that the rest of the guitar is designed for better upper fret access.

Often, for those players who do NOT ordinarily play past the 15th fret, it's because the guitar isn't set up well for that. In the case of an LP, there's usually the body point that catches your palm, the inside of the lower bout point that catches the side of larger hands (forcing you to turn your hand for access) and, on a lot of set neck Gibsons, a hump in the fretboard that leads to non-level frets and dead or buzzing sounds when you get up there. In the case of the Epiphone Prophecy EX, for example, there's still the standard heel and body shape to deal with.

On a Les Paul-style guitar like the Agile AL-2000 Floyd, on the other hand, there are still 24 frets in about the same location as those on the Epiphone Prophecy EX, but there are notable differences in design, particularly in the back:




As you can see, the body shape begins to roll down toward the cutaway beginning on the other side of the neck and the neck heel itself is a completely different shape. This, coupled with the stubby horn on the Agile is a huge bonus for upper fret access compared to the Prophecy EX.

I have other guitars with a similar body shape in the back:



The Agile AL-3200 is not a 24-fret guitar, but carries this a bit further as a neck-through guitar (and it has a nice deep tummy cut):



Carvin has a long tradition of building 24-fret guitars (these days with a 25" scale, but a lot of those on the used market are 24.75"), and their fretwork is usually superb. Most of their 24-fret guitars are neck-through with no neck heel at all, and all 24 frets free of the body, but have usually been flat-top "plank" guitars. Lately, they've begun building some of their carved-top guitars with 24 frets as well and the CS24 is their newest version:



These also feature a smoothed body/neck construction in the back, a bit thinner body (rather than cheesing or chambering the guitar), a tummy cut, and a slightly differently shaped (from the Gibson LP) cutaway assists with access to the upper frets. While these show a two-pot knob setup, other control setups are available (including a standard Gibson quad of 2V 2T).

The "Gibson Hump" that sometimes afflicts Gibsons near the mounting point of the neck to the body and their insistence on sending out guitars with too-high nuts has affected how LPs were played in the past. When there are buzzing/dead frets above the 16th fret, some players simply don't go there. And when the action is "medium" or high, the guitars haven't popularized themselves with people who want to wank in the upper registers. Often a PLEK job (or any good manual fret leveling) can fix those issues. You'll want to have a good tech determine that *before* you buy the guitar (or within the return period, at least). I've had to have brand new $4K+ Gibsons PLEK'd (even though they've supposedly been done at the factory), but they've played wonderfully after that. I had that under-$200-B-Stock Agile AL-2000 Floyd in the photo at the top PLEK'd, and it's an amazing player and has been absolutely dead stable for two years now. I've also had the frets superglued on my most-used guitars. This is a process of wicking superglue into the fret tang cavities in the fretboard. Practically speaking, this keeps the frets from popping up during dry weather, etc. For the cork sniffery among us, it seems to have a bit of tonal benefit as well, since the coupling between the string/fret/fretboard/neck wood is enhanced. You decide. Carvins don't seem to need much of this; they usually arrive from the factory ready to go with amazing fretwork, and if you ask for low action on these guitars you'll get it. At one point back when, they guaranteed an action "as low as 1/16th" at the 24th fret with no buzzing frets." I have several Carvins from the late '80s that still display that amazing action -- a testament to both their initial fretwork and the stability of their woods.

And finally, I actually prefer a flatter radius, even on the LP type guitars. Agiles come normally with a 13.7" (350mm) radius, though I have one with a 16" radius. Carvins can be ordered with 14" and even 20" radius.
#34
@dspellman - Excellent post.

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#35
I'm a big guy (6'1") that has giant hands. I prefer beefier necks over typical Ibanez designs (why is thinner better anyways?) and prefer V-carves over anything else. With my giant hands I have a hard time picking on 24 fret guitars because my pick likes to dig into the bottom side of the neck pickup. on 21-22 fret guitars I don't have this problem, or on HSS/SSS 21-22 styles either.

For that reason I prefer 21-22 fret guitars. I never feel like I'm missing out or stuck because I'm missing 2 frets on the very end of the fretboard where you rarely play anyways.
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#36
Quote by Wisthekiller
24 isn't enough.



Who as tiny enough fingers to play them frets all the way there.
#38
Quote by Flux'D
I'm a big guy (6'1") that has giant hands. I prefer beefier necks over typical Ibanez designs (why is thinner better anyways?) and prefer V-carves over anything else. With my giant hands I have a hard time picking on 24 fret guitars because my pick likes to dig into the bottom side of the neck pickup. on 21-22 fret guitars I don't have this problem, or on HSS/SSS 21-22 styles either.

For that reason I prefer 21-22 fret guitars. I never feel like I'm missing out or stuck because I'm missing 2 frets on the very end of the fretboard where you rarely play anyways.

thinner is "better" because it's easier to shred on. I'm with you, if I'm not playing a log I don't want to be playing it at all
#40
Quote by Kortez3000
I like having 24 frets because I feel like I have a complete "set". As in 12 notes at the left and its 12 octaves at the right. Makes learning the notes easier IMO even though its just a 2 fret difference.


Pretty much this. A guitar without 24 frets is pretty dumb, from a musical standpoint. It's nice having a "complete" instrument.

Anyway, my usual mantra holds true here: It's better to have and not need than to need and not have.
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