#1
Just wondering if people had some tips on what order to learn some of the music theory? Also websites and links appreciated.

So far I have started reading on musictheory.net. I'm not entirely sure if its all relevant to the bass though.

Plan to learn some scales and getting more familiar with the actual notes instead of a fret number like reading tabs. My goal is to be able to be able to recognize notes and start learning by ear.
#2
the order in musicthoery .net is a great way and all theory is applicable to all instruements

you seem to be goig in a good order already just keep reading until things start making sense
#3
Quote by supersac
the order in musicthoery .net is a great way and all theory is applicable to all instruements

you seem to be goig in a good order already just keep reading until things start making sense


Great site. I always use it to keep me in shape.

Read through those lessons and take some notes on them. When you're finished, hit the lessons tab and try each one by one.
#4
yes, this site has many great theory lessons.
also, find a good local teacher if you can afford it and just start taking lessons.

alot of people think lessons are for people who suck, its quite the opposite, lessons are for serious musicians who want to learn and expand their skill.

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#5
Quote by Narcotics
yes, this site has many great theory lessons.
also, find a good local teacher if you can afford it and just start taking lessons.

alot of people think lessons are for people who suck, its quite the opposite, lessons are for serious musicians who want to learn and expand their skill.


This. Reading about theory yourself is relatively difficult. Kudos to those who could but I know I never would have done it myself.
Expect to learn to read music too.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#6
A good teacher can present theory concepts and give you concrete examples of the theory in action, for lack of a better term.

I'm the same way, kudos to those who learn music theory from books but for me, I needed a good teacher to get me up to speed. In my upright playing I'm still digging deep into the theory bucket and it remains a significant part of my weekly lessons.
#7
Quote by anarkee
A good teacher can present theory concepts and give you concrete examples of the theory in action, for lack of a better term.

I'm the same way, kudos to those who learn music theory from books but for me, I needed a good teacher to get me up to speed. In my upright playing I'm still digging deep into the theory bucket and it remains a significant part of my weekly lessons.


Another upright player on UG?
They seem far and few between.

I want to talk to you about it, but I'll try to stay on topic while we're here:
Do you see the fingerboard differently on upright and electric? It seems like I can see the shapes of lines I want to play better on Electric, but I can think more linearly and melodically on upright.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#8
I completely agree. Fingerings become much more complex on upright--a recent etude I received in a lesson would be a breeze on electric, much more tricky no upright. I am much more linear on upright, but I also have a greater sense of intervals and relation to placement on the fretboard. I find I am a bit more creative in melody on upright as well.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1265474

There's an upright thread in the forum and I'd be glad to chat with anyone about upright--I've been at this for about 2 years and still working on playing the instrument.
#9
Well that website is great. I'm pretty good at learning myself with a book so isn't too difficult so far. Understand written sheet music, notes on the bass, intervals and scales. The only thing I wasn't aware of was that B-C and E-F are the notes which go up on half-steps. Once you remember that everything can be worked out pretty easily - unless I've over simplified it.

What do you reckon is the best way to go about training my ear now. I checked out the exercise/test on the website but its pretty difficult other than octaves, minor and major 2nds. I'm guessing get used to playing different intervals on the bass and learn to recognize them.
#11
Don't work on scales other than "knowing" the major/minor and chromatic...learn to utilize all 12 tones....

SCALES ARE NOT MUSIC

Learn your intervals, specifically major & minor 3rds, 5ths, and dom7ths.

Learn where each and every note is on the fret-board and what it it sounds like.

As a bass player your first and foremost job is to assist and groove with the drummer.

Also learn to play music, practice playing music...not exercises like scales.
Last edited by jtkguitar at Jan 26, 2012,
#12
Quote by jtkguitar
Don't work on scales other than "knowing" the major/minor and chromatic...learn to utilize all 12 tones....

SCALES ARE NOT MUSIC

Learn your intervals, specifically major & minor 3rds, 5ths, and dom7ths.

Learn where each and every note is on the fret-board and what it it sounds like.

As a bass player your first and foremost job is to assist and groove with the drummer.

Also learn to play music, practice playing music...not exercises like scales.


Ther is no such thing as a minor 5th.
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#13
Quote by jtkguitar
SCALES ARE NOT MUSIC


Scales are technical ability (Especially if you play all 12 keys, major/minor and play them in 3rds, 4ths, 5ths, 6ths, ect.). Sure this is not what the OP is asking for but technical ability helps you express yourself once you have the harmonic/melodic ideas worked out.
By your posts, you make it seem like scales are not important. They're an important tool for all musicians.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#14
I concur. Ignore the post.

Scales and chords (along with rhythm) are the structure of music, the building blocks. By learning them you train your ear to hear intervals and you learn to make intelligent and interesting choices in your bass lines that can enhance the music you are supporting by your low end. To take a recent example, knowing that a song like for instance ""Hava Nagila" and "Misirlou" is written a harmonic minor helps a great deal in making good note choices.

Once you've internalized these skills (along with the technical skills of the fretboard and just the physical movement of your hands) you are really free to be highly creative. A writer who has a good command of the language and grammar is going to be much more readable and freer to be more creative in the end, You can parallel that to musical knowledge as well

Plus jtkguitar likes being argumentative for the sake of being argumentative. Just food for thought.
#15
A diminished 5th, is a flat fifth, is a minor 5th lol

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
#16
Quote by Narcotics
A diminished 5th, is a flat fifth, is a minor 5th lol


A minor 5th doesn't exist.


To answer threadstarter,
learn the major scale.
Then learn intervals.
Then learn the modes
Then learn key signatures.
Then learn how to build your standard chords in a key.
Then make it 7ths.
Then 9ths.
Then 11ths, 13ths.
Then it's really up to you beyond that.


To "minor 5th lol":
there are two types of intervals, perfect and non-perfect.
<- = a half step lower
-> = a half step higher

diminished <- perfect -> augmented
diminished <- minor <- major -> augmented

as you can see, a 5th can be either perfect, augmented, or diminished. There is no such thing as a minor 5th. To say "same difference" is to say "I do not actually know what I'm talking about."
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#17
And the reason 4ths an 5ths are perfect is:.....................................

PS Don't you answer it Dan, let's see who knows.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
Last edited by John Swift at Jan 29, 2012,
#18
Theory is good to know but it does and can have its drawbacks in the fact that way back in the 60s in what many call the golden age of popular music, very, very few of us knew anything about theory and most of us Bassists had started out on guitsr and learnt a few chords which is what we learnt to base our playing on.
Solos were played based on the chord structure and not intentionaly on scales.
The vast majority of the 60s and early 70s classic songs were composed without direct reference to theory.
Having said all of that I do advocate the learning of theory it's an international language in music.
My old saying is that "A Miner Bird isn't clever because it can talk, it would only be clever if it knew what it was saying". so yes learn theory but don't let it rule you creativity.
PS if you learn theory you'll say 'Tone' (step), Semitone (half step).
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
Last edited by John Swift at Jan 29, 2012,
#20
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Their inversions are also perfect?



Thank you that's what I was hoping others would know which they will now.
As Deleriumbassist says 4ths & 5ths invert perfect whereas all others except octaves invert major to minor, vice versa
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#21
And every inversion = 9!!


5 +4 = 9
4 + 5 = 9

7 +2 = 9
2 + 7 = 9

and its 9 not 8 because you have to count the same note twice when you do the inversion.
im pretty sure anyways, it makes more sense on a staff when you can count the lines and spaces.

when Moses brought down the plagues upon Egypt one of them involved Behringer amps


Dont be so humble, your not that great....
Last edited by Narcotics at Jan 29, 2012,
#22
Quote by Narcotics
And every inversion = 9!!


5 +4 = 9
4 + 5 = 9

7 +2 = 9
2 + 7 = 9

and its 9 not 8 because you have to count the same note twice when you do the inversion.
im pretty sure anyways, it makes more sense on a staff when you can count the lines and spaces.


And don't foreget 1st and 8th also add up to 9 and are perfect.
I developed a very easy way of working out intervals, I just pictured my Basses neck in my mind, if you've been playing any length of time you should know what the notes are on the neck/fingerboard.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn