#1
Some friends and I are about to start a semi-serious band (All of them are in another, more solid band and I have solo stuff that I do), and I would likely be lead singer/rhythm guitarist. Does anyone have any tips/people to research to help with being a good frontman/having good stage presence? Any help would be appreciated!
#2
Learn not to look at the guitar as you play is a pretty big one I guess
Gear:

Gibson 2005 Les Paul Standard
Fender Road Worn Strat w/ Noiseless pickups
Marshall JCM 2000 401C
Marshall Vintage Modern 2266
Marshall 1960A cab (Dave Hill from Slade's old cab)
Ibanez TS9DX
EHX Little Big Muff
Freshman Acoustic
#3
Go sing in public at low pressure venues. Once you finish practicing several songs go busking and hope to draw a crowd. do open mics to get over stage fright.

and yes, play simple stuff on guitar that doesn't require you to stare at it the whole time. you should be looking at the crowd searching for groupies!
#4
The key to performing well in front of others is comfort through confidence. Learn your music and lyrics as best you can and you gotta play in front of people. Start with a friend then a small group. Throw a party and make people listen. Whatever it takes. And I always tell myself that you have got to want to do it more than you are afraid to do it. That's my piece.
#5
I've done open mic nights by myself before, but that's typically just me sitting on a stool with an acoustic guitar. I've gotten better at not staring down at my guitar when I sing, though I do catch myself sometimes. I'll keep practicing though. I think the most difficult thing for me would be singing without the guitar, since I've never done that before.
#6
Quote by You Ruined It
Go sing in public at low pressure venues. Once you finish practicing several songs go busking and hope to draw a crowd. do open mics to get over stage fright.

and yes, play simple stuff on guitar that doesn't require you to stare at it the whole time. you should be looking at the crowd searching for groupies!



Yes!

Eye contact and interaction with the crowd is key. That doesn't mean you should babble incessantly between songs, but more in a non-verbal way while singing/performing. Act like you truly believe and feel firsthand the song you are playing. Sing to a person in the crowd, real or imagined, or even a picture on the wall. Hand gestures to that "person", or acting like you know "them" with a wink, head nod, etc. can bring you to a more intimate status with the crowd. The crowd won't really know that you might be singing to a chair at the bar, but will instead feel as if it might have been to them.

Make sure you strike cool rock poses.

Do open mic, and have a friend video the performance. Learn the balance between too little and overdone. In most beginning situations, you will find that your performances will be a lifeless and boring compared to the professionals you are used to seeing.
#7
Quote by cheapr2keepr
Yes!

Sing to a person in the crowd, real or imagined.


I will definitely start doing this. I usually have avoided that because I thought it would be awkward but I can see where it would create more intimacy with the crowd, thanks!
#8
I find bands that look like they have fun the most fun to watch. Try not to look at your guitar too much, and dont just stand in front of the mic motionless all the time. Try to engage the public a little bit. And have a well-made setlist, so you know between wich songs you talk, and wich just flow into one another. Try to figure out what you are gonna say, at least a bit. Basicly, try to reherse the entire gig, with crowd interaction and everything, so that it looks natural on stage.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#9
Quote by gorkyporky
I find bands that look like they have fun the most fun to watch. Try not to look at your guitar too much, and dont just stand in front of the mic motionless all the time. Try to engage the public a little bit. And have a well-made setlist, so you know between wich songs you talk, and wich just flow into one another. Try to figure out what you are gonna say, at least a bit. Basicly, try to reherse the entire gig, with crowd interaction and everything, so that it looks natural on stage.


Good advice, thanks! I've been practicing playing songs that I would play live in the same manner I would live, and hopefully that will help me be more confident and natural. I definitely agree that bands that look like they're having fun are the most fun to watch
#10
Oh hey you live in Central New York too where are you? Anyway, it's good you play guitar that certainly makes the fronting thing a whole lot easier, but I'd be careful not to hide behind it and try interacting more in places where you don't need to be near the mic. But yeah basically I just practice my songs to the point where I can play the song by myself with my eyes closed and facing the wall and imaging how it would sound to them and it's worked pretty well so far.
#11
Have lots of fun when you play, people will be able to tell and they'll feed off the energy. When you practice, even at home by yourself, it can be helpful to sing into a mic (plugged in or not) in a stand and look at yourself in the mirror and act like you're playing for people who are watching.
#12
Tricky question, because a lot is involved. I'd say the most important thing is having your guitar parts ingrained into your mind so well that all you think about is the singing. I feel like when you're playing and singing simultaneously, you should be focusing on singing alone, since the voice tends to be more dynamic and won't sound as good if you sing without thinking about it.
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#13
Watch YouTube videos of your favorite bands and see how they do it. Recognize good stage presence (so don't just watch and go "This song is killer, I'm going to do what he does." You should be thinking "Holy shit this man moves so much and puts on a hell of a show." So maybe you'll be studying from bands you don't necessarily like).

Also, at practice and rehearsal, don't just practice your songs, practice stage presence. You may feel like an idiot moving and jumping around. Well, get the rest of your band mates to do it too. They could probably use the practice as well.

A few tips, with a guitar, don't stare at your strings, try to not look at the guitar whenever you're singing. It's cool to watch the strings during a solo for a bit, but don't look like you need to focus on where your fingers land. More like you enjoying watching the guitar shred. Move around when you can. Instrumental break or riff that's several bars long? Leave the mic, run over to your bassist and jump in time, etc.

Without a guitar. Move your hands. Your first few practices, just focus on making sure your arms aren't straight down with your hands limp at your sides. It *will* take a few practices to avoid this completely, it's harder than it seems. If in doubt, hold the mic stand, or pick the mic up off the stand and hold it. (Protip: don't cup the grill, this can cause heavy feedback. Also sing into the mic, not above it or angled into it. I've seen singers who think it's cool to point it up or sideways while they sing, and then can't understand why the mic doesn't pick up their vocals).

Also, do pick the microphone up and move around the stage. It can be cool to sing into the mic on a stand, especially for slower or more intimate songs. But as much as you can, move around dammit. Also try to sing to the audience, pick out people (like someone said, real, or fake) and sing a few lines to them. Awkward staring someone in the eyes while you sing? Do it anyways, it can help get people involved. Still too awkward? Well sing to that chair off to the side, that chair isn't judging you. Also it might seem cool to turn and sing to your bandmates, and practice/rehearsal can certainly encourage this habit. But it's actually very awkward from the crowd's perspective. The less your project yourself to the crowd, and more your project yourself onto your band, the more it looks like a band practice on stage, not a show.

Hope this helps.