#1
Musician Talk seemed like the most appropriate place to put this, so forgive me if I was wrong.

I've been looking into going to University for music, but I'm not sure it will be worth it in the long run. What careers paths or opportunities open up with a diploma in music, and how hard would it be to make a decent living with one?
#3
First and foremost, becoming a career musician is ridiculously hard regardless of whether or not you have a diploma in it. Counting exclusively on that is the surest path to sleeping on a park bench.
The university itself will usually give you a chance to make friends in high places, which does help.

With the diploma, though, several career paths are open for you. Music teaching is a dead giveaway, and accounts for almost 20% of music graduates.
Another obvious one (if you know it exists) is music therapy.

The wider creative industries also have a taste for music graduates because they can take side-classes in organising events, and they also gain the nessecary skills to work in other areas of the media.
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#4
Being a pro musician is probably one of the hardest things to make a living with, but we do it because we love it. going to school for music is a great chance to learn as much as you can not only about your instrument, but music in general, music history class was one of my favorites. also depends on what you want to do as a major, performance, buisness, etc. if you want to teach music at a place like a school you need a degree.

another great part about going to school for music is the connections and friends you'll make. i've been called many a times from my buddies at school when they need something and i've called them too, and we are still in school. and never pass up the opportunity to learn from great professors and musicians. i don't know where you live but if you live in the states then do your research on schools. i go to Umass Lowell and the head of the gtr department is Jon Wheatly, a world renowned jazz guitarist. and that's just gtr, there are so many great educators that teach at schools, find them...you won't be sorry.

classical guitarist elliot fisk came to UML a couple semesters ago to give a master class and a recital, it was an honor to have a living legend sitting two feet in front of me teaching things about gtr....just an example of some of the great things about going to school for music.

good luck!
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#5
Yep, schools can be great for that. We've had James Burton around, for example, stellar musician!
#6
I'm currently getting my music diploma. My reason is to give me the 'assumed knowledge' that uni will expect. I want to get my bachelors in performance afterwards but mainly because I think if you can successfully complete a uni degree with your instrument, your skill and ability will accelerate so much.

The career goals as a performer that I think are realistic,
- Teaching (which has been mentioned)
- Providing live music for theatre shows/plays/television
- Session musician

But when I enrolled, from day one I accepted it's going to be really really hard to get anywhere lol. But as long as you have the determination it's not impossible
#7
i have a nice piece of paper somewhere...that says i spent several years in a building complex learning music..and i did learn some nice things about music..and people..and schools..

it did not help me get any work ... the bands i worked with and the studio work i did for years was mostly referrals...because i played alot with other hot musicians that were hungry trying to find work also...much the same for musicians in rock pop jazz for a long time..

its the very few and very talented that get long term ideal work..being in a late night TV band..would cover the rent without a day job...

the classical guys have it a bit different..if they get in an established orcahstra..they may have a long term gig..many do movie sound tracks (which pay very well..double scale if you play more than one part or can play more than one instrument)

bottom line...you have to work your ass off to get established..no one is going to give it to you..

play well

wolf
#8
Let me just say, if you have any other interests, skills, talents, or activities you enjoy doing that might actually be able to provide a comfortable income, pursue them and do music on the side. I think the guy in Bad Religion is like a biology phd or something, and Brian May is an astrophysicist.
#9
Quote by bouttimeijoined
Let me just say, if you have any other interests, skills, talents, or activities you enjoy doing that might actually be able to provide a comfortable income, pursue them and do music on the side. I think the guy in Bad Religion is like a biology phd or something, and Brian May is an astrophysicist.


That's why I'm trying to double major in Music and Microbiology. Music is often too precarious to obtain a completely stable living off of, and I like to eat.
#10
Since this is open still, ill ask...

how... "Prestigious" is a composition degree from the university of idaho?
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

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#11
Quote by hey_guy
Musician Talk seemed like the most appropriate place to put this, so forgive me if I was wrong.

I've been looking into going to University for music, but I'm not sure it will be worth it in the long run. What careers paths or opportunities open up with a diploma in music, and how hard would it be to make a decent living with one?


Although you're banned, quick answer is, diploma makes next to no difference. No careers open up and there aren't many situations where it'll get you work. The reason you would get one is to get the benefit of the study environment or to work towards higher qualifications.
#12
You're putting the cart before the horse, as they say.

First, decide what you want to do, and THEN figure out what you need to do to get there.

What do you think you might like to do?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.