#1
Hey guys, I think some of you might have experience with this. I've been playing guitar for 6 years and bass 4 years, along with music theory, ear training, composition and arrengement. I know how to read sheet music, but I'm not fluent doing it, I have to take my time to decipher the music in both the treble and the bass clef. I know I wouldn't be able to sight read to save my life.

I'm deeply in love with classical music, and at first, I thought about learning how to play the upright bass, because I just had to learn fluent reading and bow movement to start progressing (and I play bass in a jazz band at the moment, it would be useful); the bass I've been playing for two years is fretless and the upright tunes just the same, but I just gave up looking for a teacher and an instrument in my region. It's very hard to find one in this area. However, one of my friends has been playing cello for 10 years and he is willing to give me some lessons. Do you think I will find it easier to learn with the musical experience I have until now?
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#2
Hi Svennz!
I also am a guitarist wanting to pick up cello (bought the cello, will be signing up for lessons very soon) and I have a similar background to you in music theory.

I think playing guitar helps with pressing down on the strings and will give you a good understanding of note spaces. But #*%& getting the bow down is really difficult. And tuning the cello... it's so frustrating, when it's too out to use the fine tuners the top pegs keep slipping or I'll break a string and cello strings are about $50 each. Cello has definitely made me realise how easy guitar is.

But in saying that, I think learning cello will greatly accelerate your music skills. Classical instruments have such a different discipline to contemporary like guitar. For example, you HAVE to learn how to read music fluently, there is no tab to rely on. You HAVE to hit each note perfectly, there are no frets to do it for you (although with your fretless bass would have given you good practice for this). You HAVE to learn where your notes are, there are no circles dotted on.

So although I think cello is a more difficult instrument than guitar, I also think guitar will help with learning cello rather than having no previous instrument skills. But only to an extent.

Was there something in particular that made you want to take up cello or just your love for classical music in general?
Last edited by Alysoun at Jan 23, 2012,
#3
get a double bass - for real men!
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#4
Quote by Alysoun
Hi Svennz!

But in saying that, I think learning cello will greatly accelerate your music skills. Classical instruments have such a different discipline to contemporary like guitar. For example, you HAVE to learn how to read music fluently, there is no tab to rely on. You HAVE to hit each note perfectly, there are no frets to do it for you (although with your fretless bass would have given you good practice for this). You HAVE to learn where your notes are, there are no circles dotted on.



Exactly that mind set of regarding the guitar as "an easy instrument", is the source for so many shitty guitar players.

Too many times I hear people play legato on guitar that sounds less legato then my alternate picking.

Too often I hear bends out of tune.

Too often I hear a vibrato so wide and aggressive that I want to believe said person got a shock from his strings at that given moment.

Too often people don't learn about notes on guitar, so that they play shitty barre voiced 7th chords and call it "jazz".

Too often people have bad right hand strumming technique which makes a good riff sound un-dynamic or un-funky.

Please don't regard guitar as an easy instrument, cause when you can play it well it's a most beautiful one.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 23, 2012,
#5
Quote by xxdarrenxx

Please don't regard guitar as an easy instrument, cause when you can play it well it's a most beautiful one.

Hey Darren,
Don't get me wrong, I agree with you completely. I meant guitar is 'easy' as in it's easy to be lazy with it, like all of those things you listed.
#6
@ Darren, I agree 100% with everything you said. I look at the guitar and see a complex instrument that entices me to learn more.

On topic now:

I don't have much experience with.. "standard" classical instruments, but I can say that, from what experience I do have, learning a new instrument with some music background, however limited or different, will help you out. Especially in this case, I would assume, as bass and cello are quite similar (if you've ever played the bass with a bow).

Long story short: I'd think that learning the cello, from your experience, will be much easier than if you were a first-time student. Good luck to you! I also love the sound, and hope to one day 'master' it .
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#7
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Exactly that mind set of regarding the guitar as "an easy instrument", is the source for so many shitty guitar players.

Too many times I hear people play legato on guitar that sounds less legato then my alternate picking.

Too often I hear bends out of tune.

Too often I hear a vibrato so wide and aggressive that I want to believe said person got a shock from his strings at that given moment.

Too often people don't learn about notes on guitar, so that they play shitty barre voiced 7th chords and call it "jazz".

Too often people have bad right hand strumming technique which makes a good riff sound un-dynamic or un-funky.

Please don't regard guitar as an easy instrument, cause when you can play it well it's a most beautiful one.


Do you remember when you started playing guitar? Didn't playing that $100 squier through the 10W amp sound delightful? Just because your ear has developed to pick out the finer nuances of playing doesn't mean new players shouldnt be allowed to enjoy playing however they like, with strings 10 cents off tune, fret buzz on every other note, bending strings as they play etc!. Having the frets there to force you into the chromatic scale is what makes it easy to pick up and enjoy learning. Light strings and high gain make for a very rewarding experience right from day 1. It's easy in the sense that you don't have to practice 10 hours a day for 6 years to start to feel good about playing it.

That said, the cello is a beautiful instrument. The finger strength you develop playing guitar will help tremendously in learning cello, and your ear has certainly developed whether you notice or not from learning guitar. The lack of frets and bowing technique - and perhaps larger strings if you never played bass - will be your weak areas. If you have a friend with 10 years experience willing to teach you, then you pretty much have to go for it!
#8
^^ Ah I didn't mean to imply that if you play guitar you should be good at it.

What I meant was that a lot of people say they can for instance play (insert shred solo), because they can somewhat hit the accurate frets.

They then proceed to say, ooh that solo is easy I can do it.

After a while they don't' get the same satisfaction, and they begin to add more gain, lower/droptunings, less mids w/e.

Tone is as much in the fingers on guitar, as it is on a Cello.

Being "lazy" with it doesn't make the guitar "easy" it's make you lazy.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 24, 2012,