#1
I'm trying to improve my legato technique. I'm basing it mostly on, imo the best legato player, Allan Holdsworth.

Any tips you guys could give me?
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#2
Use a metronome and practice at very very slow speeds. Holdsworth uses very little gain so getting them hammers to sound takes a lot of strength and precision.


Personally, i prefer joe satriani's legato technique. I think it has more uses than alans style. If you like to play metal then satriani's will be better to learn imo.
#3
Dave Murray has really good legato technique. If you play metal, give him a listen.

I definitely agree with the previous post, though. Practice it slowly, to build up strength, then work your way up to tempo. You may also try to find some legato exercises to practice.
Last edited by Drache Wachter at Jan 23, 2012,
#4
Yh Dave Murray is definitely worth checking out but his legato technique is pretty much based on trills
#5
Quote by Crazyedd123
I'm trying to improve my legato technique. I'm basing it mostly on, imo the best legato player, Allan Holdsworth.

Any tips you guys could give me?


Check out Pebber Browns Trills (left hand ecercises for virtuoso technique)
he is friends with Allan in person and holds him in great regard .
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Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 23, 2012,
#6
As well, look at Rock Discipline's exercises, there are very good exercises to practice legato. (I'm using it).
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#8
Well, to be honest I would suggest you learn the standard legato style first - it's impossible to play everything with only hammers (neither Holdsy or Garsed actually does this), and a lot of the standard rock legato licks require pulloffs.

Aside from that, for standard legato, the important things are economy of motion, relaxation, and co-ordination. A useful tip is that you should rarely be fretting with more than one finger - don't "lock" 3 fingers down and then pull off all three.

For the advanced legato stuff, where you're crossing strings with hammers and playing wider interval leaps, it's really important to get hammers from nowhere really good on first and fourth fingers.

I have a couple of legato exercises that are very efficient if you're already decent at it -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89ICrLfbG9I - every possible hammer/pull combination between 4 fingers
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFQb5Rqn89I - a kind of holdsworthy lick, good for hammers from nowhere on fingers 1 and 4.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBk1PPEcBJI - for hofn on every finger

Enjoy.
#9
One thing that seems to impede my legato at the moment is how my ring and pinky finger tend to want to hammeron and pulloff at the same time as each other.

I'm trying to work on getting those two to be as independent as possible.


Also, I'm trying to playing in such a way that there's basically only one finger on the fretboard at a time (as soon as I've played a note and I've moved onto the next one, I remove my finger from the fret I just played). Do you think it's worth doing such a thing?
Breakfast, Breakfast, it's great for us
We eat, we eat, we eat
That frozen meat
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, it can't be beat
#10
Also, I'm trying to playing in such a way that there's basically only one finger on the fretboard at a time (as soon as I've played a note and I've moved onto the next one, I remove my finger from the fret I just played). Do you think it's worth doing such a thing?


Yeah, it ends up really important for trickier legato stuff.
#12
Anything without rolls basically, especially if you're crossing strings with hammers.

Eg, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFQb5Rqn89I&list=PL8285311F648D6999&index=6&feature=plpp_video or this kind of thing -

E||--10-12-8-10----8----------------------------||
B||-------------12---10-12-8-10----8------------||
G||-----------------------------12---10-12-9-10-||
D||---------------------------------------------||
A||---------------------------------------------||
E||---------------------------------------------||


Not to mention it's simply inefficient - why exert unneeded effort?
#13
True. But you wouldn´t do that with rolls would you? I think that would be wrong.
#14
Why?

I mean, it's not really a big deal with rolls and at tempo lots of stuff starts to mush together... but still the ideal would be for your unused fingers to be relaxed. All extra pressure does is tire you out and make you worse at changing positions.
#15
Because of the anatomy. Its actually more relaxed to press down 3rd and 4th finger if 1st and 2nd are already fretted because the tendos are not completely independent but synergistic. It´s the more natural motion. Also if slides are involved it makes more sense to leave frettes fingers in their place imo. Only until you leave the string of course.
#16
By definition, you cannot be "more relaxed" by pressing down with more fingers. It requires effort.

Secondly, the fact that the fingers are not independent is the problem, not the solution. Learning to keep fingers relaxed instead of letting them react to their neighbours is fundamental to good technique.

Finally, if I was sliding, I'd rather be holding down one finger than 3. Please pick up your guitar, and while fretting three notes, slide. Then slide with pressure only on one finger. 3 times the friction + 3 times the effort fretting = a lot more work.
#17
Lifting the finger requires effort because the muscles that flex your fingers are stronger than the ones that extend them. Therefore the natural 0 position is pretty similar to a fretted finger, not the lifted. Of course we try to gain a certain amount of independence between the fingers, but if the result is similar I will alway choose the natural motion in regard to health. Doing so doesn´t effect my abilities in independence where required. If the lifting works for you thats fine but I don´t think it´s the way to go if not in the particular situations you described ealier.
#19
Quote by Freepower
That's why I said relaxed, not lifted.


Yh

To unfret a note doesnt mean to lift off. Your index finger should still be on the fret so it can mute the above and below string(s) but it doesn't have to be applying enough force to fret a note.

So many people think to unfret a note means to lift your finger off the string
#20
Quote by mrbabo91
Yh

To unfret a note doesnt mean to lift off. Your index finger should still be on the fret so it can mute the above and below string(s) but it doesn't have to be applying enough force to fret a note.

So many people think to unfret a note means to lift your finger off the string

Ye, I was thinking of playing that way.

I'm trying to apply this same principle to my sweep picking. Sometimes when I let go of a string to move to another, it rings out, so I'm trying to leave atleast one finger in a position that stops this.

It's very interesting what you find out about your playing when you go down to microscopic levels such as that.
Breakfast, Breakfast, it's great for us
We eat, we eat, we eat
That frozen meat
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, it can't be beat
#21
Quote by Freepower

Finally, if I was sliding, I'd rather be holding down one finger than 3. Please pick up your guitar, and while fretting three notes, slide. Then slide with pressure only on one finger. 3 times the friction + 3 times the effort fretting = a lot more work.


You don´t need pressure. Just using the other fingers as a guideline. Same thing with vibrato. You would never do vibrato or bends with only one finger fretted unless its the index finger and you have no other choice. Same principal. Every auxiliary finger helps eliminating dysmetric shananigans.
#22
Well if you don't need pressure then you aren't really leaving "fretted fingers in their place" - fretted fingers are exerting pressure. Otherwise you're just relaxing your fingers.

With vibrato and bends you actually need the other fingers to assist - they have to help transmit quite a large amount of force. With legato it's totally different.

Just to check - we're actually totally agreed on the fact that fingers not currently sounding a note should be relaxed, not fretting or lifted?