#1
I'd like to confirm with you some information I came across. Is it true that when playing solo you should keep your ear on chords and play in a key of the same letter as present chord? If you still don't know what I mean, let's take a simple example. Let's say we want to play some blues in a minor. The chords are A7, D7 and E7. So when A7 chord is played, we play solo over A minor pentatonic. When it goes to D7, we change to D minor pentatonic etc. etc. Is that right? Or you should play only over Am pentatonic?

I'm very new to theory music, so excuse me my ignorance.
#2
I'm not the best at music theory, but I think you can play any scale that coincides with those chords if they fall in that key. There are too many scales to limit yourself to just those three chords with that one scale.
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#3
Well, i'm not that good at theory either but from my experience it dosent work that well switching scales when changing chords. What does work very well though is using chordal notes as a map when soloing over chord changes.

For example, an A7 chord uses the notes A, C sharp, E and G. So i would use those notes as target notes and then use either A minor pentatonic or some chromatic notes. Then when the next chord comes (D7) i should stay in A minor pentatonic but i will target the notes in that chord if i want greater sound instead. (Notes in D7 = D, F sharp, A and C.)

So my advice is to look more at the notes within the chords and use them.

That's what i would do, but just trust your ears man. If something sounds good to you, do it!
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#4
Quote by Sumka
I'd like to confirm with you some information I came across. Is it true that when playing solo you should keep your ear on chords and play in a key of the same letter as present chord? If you still don't know what I mean, let's take a simple example. Let's say we want to play some blues in a minor. The chords are A7, D7 and E7. So when A7 chord is played, we play solo over A minor pentatonic. When it goes to D7, we change to D minor pentatonic etc. etc. Is that right? Or you should play only over Am pentatonic?

I'm very new to theory music, so excuse me my ignorance.


OK youve got a I IV V progression in Amajor . very very common.

Look at the notes of the chords.

A7 = A C# E G

D7 = D F# A C

E7 = E G# B D

I would use A mixolydian over the A chord and A major over the other D and E. The reason for this is, your A7 chord contains a G# which isn't found in the A major scale. It contains a G which mean. G is a flattened 7th and the mixolydian scale is a major scale with a flattened 7th.

The thing stopping you using A mixolydian over all of it is the G# in the E chord.
#5
Uh... Well, first off, playing minors over a Dominant chord would be more of a jazz domain ; jazz loves the dominant chord. A dominant chord is a MAJOR chord with a minor 7th. If you want to solo over chords with a minor pentatonic, I would either reccomend soloing over those chords in m7 versions, or playing the relative minor of those chords' keys, i.e.:
- A7 is in the key of Bm
- D7 is in the key of Em
- E7 is in the key of F#m
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#7
Quote by Sumka
I'd like to confirm with you some information I came across. Is it true that when playing solo you should keep your ear on chords and play in a key of the same letter as present chord? If you still don't know what I mean, let's take a simple example. Let's say we want to play some blues in a minor. The chords are A7, D7 and E7. So when A7 chord is played, we play solo over A minor pentatonic. When it goes to D7, we change to D minor pentatonic etc. etc. Is that right? Or you should play only over Am pentatonic?

I'm very new to theory music, so excuse me my ignorance.


The short answer is no, but.

Here's the long answer:

When you're just learning, just stick to one scale. Play - using your example - Am pentatonic over the whole thing. That's a good way to get a basic blues or blues-rock feel, and a great place to start developing your ear. LISTEN and notice how various notes of Am pentatonic sound different over the different chords.

But -

You WILL see guitarists do what you describe, particularly with the pentatonic scales. Somebody might play A major pentatonic over the A, D major pentatonic over the D, etc. This can actually give you a nice hendrix-like sound, because if you look at the pentatonics, you'll notice that, for example, the A major pentatonic contains the same notes as an A major chord ... plus the second and sixth, which are nice notes for embellishment. So by playing in that scale you imply the chord rather than play it.

What this ultimately gets to is the notion that there isn't always one "correct" scale to play over a given chord progression. As you improve and develop your ear (and you are doing some work specifically on your ear, right?) and your understanding of different sounds, you'll realize that the scale selection is a choice driven by the sounds you want to create.

Soloing over A7/D7/E7 with a minor pentatonic will sound VERY different from soloing over them using the major pentatonic for each chord. Neither is "wrong" - it's about the sound you want to create.

However, for somebody at your level of experience, you should stick to SIMPLE scale choices so that you can focus on the sounds you are creating rather than constantly worrying about where your fingers go. The idea is to get comfortable improvising the right way - which is by having your brain drive your fingers based on MUSICAL (not physical) ideas. The minor pentatonic is a great place to start for this.

So, for now, just stick to one scale.
#8
TS, whatever you think you know about "keys", you're going to have to relearn it. What you have presented us with is one of the most common chord progressions in history. If you cannot identify what scale/s to play over this, you'll have to go back to basics.
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#9
Quote by AlanHB
TS, whatever you think you know about "keys", you're going to have to relearn it. What you have presented us with is one of the most common chord progressions in history. If you cannot identify what scale/s to play over this, you'll have to go back to basics.



Exactly. Learn Major scales, and then Diatonic Harmony.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by Sumka
I'd like to confirm with you some information I came across. Is it true that when playing solo you should keep your ear on chords and play in a key of the same letter as present chord? If you still don't know what I mean, let's take a simple example. Let's say we want to play some blues in a minor. The chords are A7, D7 and E7. So when A7 chord is played, we play solo over A minor pentatonic. When it goes to D7, we change to D minor pentatonic etc. etc. Is that right? Or you should play only over Am pentatonic?

I'm very new to theory music, so excuse me my ignorance.


Here's how you want to approach this.

The progression you posted is in the key of A, but because they're all 7th chords, you have notes outside of the key of A in each chord, AND because it's a blues progression (not sure if that's how you're trying to play it), you'll want to bring in that A blues scale, which can clash heavily with the chord tones depending on context.

What you want to be able to do, is form the basis of your melodies on a scale such as the A minor pentatonic or A blues, and make small adjustments to the scale as you're playing over the different chords mostly to incorporate the chord tones. For example, hit the F# over the D7. You can take parts of the D and E scales over those chords to add some colour to your playing, but if you switch scales entirely with each changing chord, your melody is going to sound disjointed. Just try it, experiment, etc.
#11
Quote by Sickz
Well, i'm not that good at theory either but from my experience it dosent work that well switching scales when changing chords. What does work very well though is using chordal notes as a map when soloing over chord changes.

For example, an A7 chord uses the notes A, C sharp, E and G. So i would use those notes as target notes and then use either A minor pentatonic or some chromatic notes. Then when the next chord comes (D7) i should stay in A minor pentatonic but i will target the notes in that chord if i want greater sound instead. (Notes in D7 = D, F sharp, A and C.)

So my advice is to look more at the notes within the chords and use them.

That's what i would do, but just trust your ears man. If something sounds good to you, do it!


I think this is a very good approach as it will hinder you to just "noodle around" without really thinking of what you are doing in comparison to the "backing" music, which otherwise happens pretty easily if just playing a scale.

"That's what i would do, but just trust your ears man. If something sounds good to you, do it!"

I had to text that out again because I cannot overemphasize the importance of this, as the only thing that matters in the end is the sound, all the other stuff is just serving as guidelines to achieving different effects.
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