#1
Hi, I've got an M Audio Fast track with pro tools going into my laptop, my mic is a Shure SM57 and I've got a Tele and a Les paul through a Marshall DSL401, so I've got some fairly decent gear. I'm fairly new to mixing, but I've recorded a couple of songs which sound great coming through headphones but on external speakers sound really fuzzy and muddy whereas on the headphones they sound really clear. My set up for the song is a telecaster panned left, and my LP panned right for rhythm, a bass panned centre then the solo is my LP panned centre. On the guitars I've got a high pass filter and some reverb. Can someone explain why it sounds bad on speakers??? Is there something I need to cut out of the mix to make it sound better on speakers? Like less mids or something?
thanks in advance, dave
Gibson SG Standard, Gibson SG 60s tribute, Edwards Les Paul, Fender Telecaster, Epiphone SG Custom
#2
What headphones & speakers are you using?

It will always sound different when switching between them, so you'll need to get used to coping with that difference, however it could also be related to the quality of your speakers or headphones.
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#3
Couldn't have said it any better myself. Gary, awesome answer man. Question for OP. When you listen back to your rec., have you used any other speakers apart from the ones you use for your "rig" ?
#4
Everything will sound different on headphones than it does on speakers due to the physical properties of the two. Part of the mixing engineers job is to make the mix sound as good as it can on a variety of different sound systems. You just need to learn how to compensate for the differences between them. Certain speakers sound different than other speakers. Listen to some of your favorite songs that you know really well on your speakers and headphones, listening to the differences between them. Try to compensate for that difference in your mix.
#5
don't ever mix on headphones. it doens't translate b/c you're not mixing it in a real space.

monitoring environment is paramount
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#6
Quote by fastlanestoner
don't ever mix on headphones. it doens't translate b/c you're not mixing it in a real space.

monitoring environment is paramount

That's not quite true. A LOT of engineers mix on headphones. Beyonce's engineer does, and a ton of metal guys do as well. You do need a great pair of headphones that you're comfortable with though. It is tougher, but if you know your headphones, you can get a great sounding mix.
Last edited by chaosmoon at Jan 23, 2012,
#7
Good headphones > Poor monitors.

I always use my headphones for mixing, although I have some speakers to provide a comparison before creating an initial mix which I then write to CD and listen to in my car before creating the final mix.

All 3 sound different, which is why I always listen to all 3. I focus on getting the sound so it is right in my car (that's where I listen to my music the most), and that is easier using my headphones than it is using my speakers.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#8
All about the native EQ mayng.
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