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#1
Lately, in the past week or so, I have been playing for about 3-4 hours a day.

Is this good enough to become good within a year or so? I have noticed my fingers have started to get a bit quicker, but I don't know if that is long enough to get good.

Thanks
#2
Your idea of "good" will forever be out of reach. If you continue on this course for a year, you'll be great by today's standard, and in need of improvement by a year-from-now's standard.

Short answer: yes.

Best advice: metronome, all the time.
#3
Yes. Bestest advice: Play music, not exercises.
Pamposh’s final question before drifting into a state of transcendent ecstasy was, “But Master, if everything is an illusion, then why does anything matter?”

To which the master replied, “It may all be an illusion, but it’s a very real illusion.”
#4
Metronomes are just as useful while playing music as they are for exercises. Good rhythm is the first thing people will hear from your music.

Edit: Best way I can put it: What's the benefit of making great music if you can't play it with other people?
Last edited by maroon5mustdie at Jan 24, 2012,
#5
important thing to remember, don't get too programmed into metronomic playing. when you can follow a rhythm and play cleanly, don't stick to just working on 4/4 turning up the bpm until your fingers bleed. learn syncopation, learn new time signatures, learn to swing.

i'm ****ing tired of watching kids try to improvise jazz or hendrix or something in perfect timing, it sounds like they're wearing a shock collar and have no emotional connection to the sounds they're producing.
modes are a social construct
#8
Quote by AlanHB
Can you play any full songs?


I can play a few full songs like Wish you were here by Pink Floyd etc.
#9
Quote by Jamesyyy
Lately, in the past week or so, I have been playing for about 3-4 hours a day.

Is this good enough to become good within a year or so? I have noticed my fingers have started to get a bit quicker, but I don't know if that is long enough to get good.

Thanks



Well I don't know what you are "practicing", but If you want to be "good" as in fingerboard wanking up and down the neck without any regards to what you are playing , which is what most guitar players fall into the trap of ( a bad thing) , then probably.

I would highly suggest you "practice" the correct way if you plan to get serious about guitar.
Last edited by Appetite_4_GNR at Jan 24, 2012,
#10
If you want to become a better player, your first and most important goal should be to play with other musicians that are better than you are. That's the fastest and most entertaining way to improve; that way, it doesn't seem like practice, and you can ask people questions WHILE you're jamming.
#11
Quote by Calymos
If you want to become a better player, your first and most important goal should be to play with other musicians that are better than you are. That's the fastest and most entertaining way to improve; that way, it doesn't seem like practice, and you can ask people questions WHILE you're jamming.


mmm nahhhh it will annoy them after a while if you are way below their level, the first and most important thing is to woodshed everyday for a couple of years. Jamming is jamming, practicing is practicing. The whole point of practicing is that one day you can spend all your time just jamming or writing songs because you have acquired the technical proficiency you wished.
Quote by Hail
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Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 24, 2012,
#12
Quote by Slashiepie
mmm nahhhh it will annoy them after a while if you are way below their level, the first and most important thing is to woodshed everyday for a couple of years. Jamming is jamming, practicing is practicing. The whole point of practicing is that one day you can spend all your time just jamming or writing songs because you have acquired the technical proficiency you wished.


i think this is the one time i've disagreed with you

of course practice on your own as well as with others, but unless you're trying to learn by jamming with rusty cooley or something, the gap shouldn't be huge, and you don't even need to start a band with them or something. networking is a very underrated skill for musicians, and your timing, communication, and general musical skills will increase a lot more quickly than bedroom-guitaring for 3 years. i learned this the hard way - i'd spent so much time playing to prepare to "one day" join a band, i never actually got around to making a band, but once i did, my skill level improved more in one month fundamentally than it had from all the shredding i'd done ahead of time.

yeah, we sounded like shit, but it was fun and it helped me a lot with stuff i never factored in before i tried writing music with other people. yeah, i love the aspect of sitting down with a quill and parchment and writing (read: midi mapping), but you just can't replace the experiences from wanking around with some friends in a dirty old basement.
modes are a social construct
#13
When you said "good", that's an opinion. Therefore none of us can say you are good and mean it in the same way. When my teacher says "good" he means average. If he talks about Jason Becker or Randy Rhoads he'll say something like "that's impossible, but I love his skills".

You should NEVER stop improving. There's always something to learn and master. Try learning new techniques or studying new guitarist or other instrumentalists. Even if you don't enjoy a certain guitarist, you can ALWAYS learn something from them.

Quote by Slashiepie
mmm nahhhh it will annoy them after a while if you are way below their level, the first and most important thing is to woodshed everyday for a couple of years. Jamming is jamming, practicing is practicing. The whole point of practicing is that one day you can spend all your time just jamming or writing songs because you have acquired the technical proficiency you wished.


I disagree. Practice makes you better, and keeps you "maintained" in technical ability. That's like saying "I'll learn music theory at Berklee, then when I'm done, I'll never review anything but use it to jam and practice." Yes at one point your very good with using it, but without practice (or reviewing) you get rusty or forget.
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Last edited by Xter at Jan 24, 2012,
#14
Depends what you're doing in those 3-4 hours. In any case, in a year's time, you will be better. It's not the hours you put in, but what you put in the hours.
#15
Quote by maroon5mustdie
Your idea of "good" will forever be out of reach. If you continue on this course for a year, you'll be great by today's standard, and in need of improvement by a year-from-now's standard.

Short answer: yes.

Best advice: metronome, all the time.


This is so true. There have been several periods where I've either thought I was good, improved, looked back and realised I wasn't or when I've thought I'm not that great then realised that I play/learn more advanced things better then others around me.

The former seems to happen early on, the first x months/years of learning, and the latter when you're more comfortable with the instrument - presumably because early on you thought you were good only to realise you weren't so frequently that it knocked your confidence

Quote by Hail
you just can't replace the experiences from wanking around with some friends in a dirty old basement.


Even in context that sounds wrong
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Jan 24, 2012,
#16
Quote by gynther flynt
Yes. Bestest advice: Play music, not exercises.
Really? May you say something more plz? -.-
#17
Quote by Jamesyyy
Lately, in the past week or so, I have been playing for about 3-4 hours a day.

Is this good enough to become good within a year or so? I have noticed my fingers have started to get a bit quicker, but I don't know if that is long enough to get good.

Thanks

it really depends on what you are doing in those 3-4 hours. you will become better at whatever you are doing though. however, i dont know if its only a few things or if you are using bad technique or what have you.

focus on good technique, dont spend a lot of time playing the exact same thing all the time. in other words, try to expand what you know. also, spend at lest half of your practice time "just playing" (improvising) and making your own music. exercises are drills are good, but if you cant apply them to making music then whats the point?
#18
is "practise" a european thing or a bad spelling thing? i've seen lots of people spell it like this but i've never figured out why.

as for the thread, i've found consistent playing is the most important part of any practice schedule. make sure that you spend at least 30 minutes a day warming up your hands. obviously if you spend more time on it daily you'll get better quicker.
#19
^ practise is the verb, practice is the noun.

Is this good enough to become good within a year or so?


What's good? It's enough to improve lots and if you enjoy playing guitar, just keep doing it.
#22
^ i'm ok with that, honestly the way people write / email here in america is pretty bad. the vast majority of americans need all the help they can get with the "whatever, you get what i meant" attitude that's so pervasive of todays young whippersnappers.
#23
Quote by Calibos
It's not the hours you put in, but what you put in the hours.


So very true.

I would also like to add that backing tracks are a great way to practice playing in time (after youre tired of the metronome) and develop your ear to hear how each note of the diatonic scale sounds over different chords.
#24
Quote by Hail

yeah, we sounded like shit, but it was fun and it helped me a lot with stuff i never factored in before i tried writing music with other people. yeah, i love the aspect of sitting down with a quill and parchment and writing (read: midi mapping), but you just can't replace the experiences from wanking around with some friends in a dirty old basement.


Gave it some tought, you are right.
Jamming with Rustey Cooley and insane skill differences excluded..

Quote by Xter

I disagree. Practice makes you better, and keeps you "maintained" in technical ability. That's like saying "I'll learn music theory at Berklee, then when I'm done, I'll never review anything but use it to jam and practice." Yes at one point your very good with using it, but without practice (or reviewing) you get rusty or forget.


I like your attitude
However i meant this in a bicicle riding kind of way, there are things that once you know them you simply know them "forever" and so they build on more advanced techniques or ideas. By writing songs you would be now working on those solid foundations.

It would be insanely cool to just spend 1 hour on technique and then 7 hours on writing music/jamming,/improvising.

My approach is that i have to spend those 7 hours still working on technique until the day when i dont suck that much and im free to play all the things that are in my head. I know many people do the opposite, both will get results , no doubt about it, but for me A) is more efficient.

Should you discover you are forgetting/getting rusty at X , then you "go back" and woodshed X for as long as needed, should you never ever need X , then there is nothing to worry about it, you know it but you dont need it, you can concentrate on the things you like most and take them to the next level.
Quote by Hail
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Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 25, 2012,
#26
It's not about how long you practise, it's about how well you practise.
Last edited by MaddMann274 at Jan 26, 2012,
#27
Quote by MaddMann274
It's not about how long you practise, it's about how well you practise.


Its about how long you practise well.
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
#28
you will never be good in your own views. continue at that practice rate with a metronome and you will be pretty good in a years time. just keep at it, and when your fingers hurt you know ya doing it right.
Quote by element4433
One time I watched a dog lick his own dick for twenty minutes.

Quote by Roc8995
No.


Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
#29
Quote by z4twenny
is "practise" a european thing or a bad spelling thing? i've seen lots of people spell it like this but i've never figured out why.

as for the thread, i've found consistent playing is the most important part of any practice schedule. make sure that you spend at least 30 minutes a day warming up your hands. obviously if you spend more time on it daily you'll get better quicker.

It's pretty much people google that every word in British English spelled -ce ends on -se in American English.
They then give you an example defence-defense.
The sad thing it that it is with -fence -fense as far as I know.
#31
Quote by Freepower
America = Easy Mode English.

Both sides can feel superior about that.

American is a completely different form than British.
It's because the US used to be a British settlement.
They fought themselves free from the British and became independent.
Later they developped their own style of English.
And that is the only thing I've learned in history mainly because it was the most interesting.
EDIT:American English is without French influences.
So Centre (british) is Center (american).
Becaues French SUCKS!
Last edited by liampje at Jan 26, 2012,
#32
Quote by liampje
No it's about how well and how long you practice.


Erm you just reiterated the same.

How long you practice well = how long and well you practice = how well and long you practice.

Summary
Practice Results = Time x Quality (yeah i am saying its multiplicative)
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 26, 2012,
#33
Quote by Calibos
Depends what you're doing in those 3-4 hours. In any case, in a year's time, you will be better. It's not the hours you put in, but what you put in the hours.



Exactly....if I had a year with him and he was diligent to study and apply what we teach for example...can you imagine?

By the way, good to see you man - hope you're doing well!

Best,

Sean
#34
Quote by Slashiepie
Erm you just reiterated the same.

How long you practice well = how long and well you practice = how well and long you practice.

Summary
Practice Results = Time x Quality (yeah i am saying its multiplicative)

I'm too good at maths to approve this :p.
Practice Results=Time*quality*talent.
But yeah I did read it wrong.
#35
Quote by liampje
I'm too good at maths to approve this :p.
Practice Results=Time*quality*talent.
But yeah I did read it wrong.


Hehehe :P now look what you did!! you started a talent vs practice war..

I say:

Practice Results = (Time * Quality) + (Talent/100)
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 26, 2012,
#37
Quote by Slashiepie
Hehehe :P now look what you did!! you started a talent vs practice war..

I say:

Practice Results = (Time * Quality) + (Talent/100)

So you think talent only matters 1 of a 100th?
It actually is more important than the time.
Talent and quality results into a small amount of time, to get something.
We are the UG nerds :p
#38
Quote by Jamesyyy
Lately, in the past week or so, I have been playing for about 3-4 hours a day.

Is this good enough to become good within a year or so? I have noticed my fingers have started to get a bit quicker, but I don't know if that is long enough to get good.

Thanks

Everybody learns and improves at an individual pace.

3-4 hours a day is good if you use that 3-4 hours well. If you're just learning easy songs that will only take you so far.

Good is subjective. For me, I didn't feel good until I could get what I was hearing/making up in my head, onto the fret board in real time. And even then I know my limitations.

If you're still fidgety on the fret board then do drills regularly. Like running up and back down the neck playing every note on every string. I think it's called "four finger exercise".
#39
Quote by liampje
So you think talent only matters 1 of a 100th?
It actually is more important than the time.
Talent and quality results into a small amount of time, to get something.
We are the UG nerds :p


i think talent makes a huge difference at the beginning, but mostly because of the schematas and motivation it activates :P

Afterwards.. the great equializer experience and effort just overshadow any "natural talent" (autistic geniuses and other socially disfunctional yet immensely intelligent individuals aside and excluded from this examples)

If we take that 10,000 hour "rule" as an example of how much deliberate practice time expertise on any field requieres.

Talent means only some predisposition based on the right attitude mixed with the personal knowledge of finding what you are good at and what you like real fast.

It might let you advance quicker on some areas and maybe "save you some time".. but no one can excel at everything, that im sure of so you will still have to put extra hours in those other things you suck at.

Talent is unnecesary and in no way a requisite or even a pondering factor, assuming no physical or mental handicaps or ilnesses are present.

(physical talents aside in out of context examples, e.g becoming a basketball professional when you are 1.50 m tall is not talent but biological predisposition)

Anyone can become a virtuoso, as long as they have functioning ears and an immense ammount of time/discipline/love for what they do.
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 26, 2012,
#40
Quote by Slashiepie
i think talent makes a huge difference at the beginning, but mostly because of the schematas and motivation it activates :P

Afterwards.. the great equializer experience and effort just overshadow any "natural talent" (autistic geniuses and other socially disfunctional yet immensely intelligent individuals aside and excluded from this examples)

If we take that 10,000 hour "rule" as an example of how much deliberate practice time expertise on any field requieres.

Talent means only some predisposition based on the right attitude mixed with the personal knowledge of finding what you are good at and what you like real fast.

It might let you advance quicker on some areas and maybe "save you some time".. but no one can excel at everything, that im sure of so you will still have to put extra hours in those other things you suck at.

Talent is unnecesary and in no way a requisite or even a pondering factor, assuming no physical or mental handicaps or ilnesses are present.

(physical talents aside in out of context examples, e.g becoming a basketball professional when you are 1.50 m tall is not talent but biological predisposition)

Anyone can become a virtuoso, as long as they have functioning ears and an immense ammount of time/discipline/love for what they do.

No it does really matter and is absolutely necesary when you have no time to practice .
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