#3
Probably a bit brighter and tinnier by default, but I think it depends more upon things like material, coating, technique, and all that stuff.
#4
Quote by TextOnTheScreen
Probably a bit brighter and tinnier by default, but I think it depends more upon things like material, coating, technique, and all that stuff.


Yeah, thanks; I was reading that Jimmy Page used 8's so I was thinking of giving them a try: the Ernie Ball extra slinky's.
#5
It's very hard to hear any difference between such similar string gauges. When you jump from .09s to .11s you can hear a little difference on the 5th and 6th strings but you'll struggle to hear any difference on the other four. Comparing .09s and .12s directly will show up a more obvious difference, but even then it's nothing ground breaking Going from .09s to .08s is next to nothing and unless you get two absolutely identical guitars with the same set up through the same amp and compare the two gauges that way at the same time, you probably won't notice any difference.

Of all the things that effect your tone, string gauge is way down on the list. Personally, I'd even put it below pickguard material. Your playing comfort and ease should be a much higher priority for you; use the string gauge that you find most comfortable.
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#6
Quote by MrFlibble
It's very hard to hear any difference between such similar string gauges. When you jump from .09s to .11s you can hear a little difference on the 5th and 6th strings but you'll struggle to hear any difference on the other four. Comparing .09s and .12s directly will show up a more obvious difference, but even then it's nothing ground breaking Going from .09s to .08s is next to nothing and unless you get two absolutely identical guitars with the same set up through the same amp and compare the two gauges that way at the same time, you probably won't notice any difference.

Of all the things that effect your tone, string gauge is way down on the list. Personally, I'd even put it below pickguard material. Your playing comfort and ease should be a much higher priority for you; use the string gauge that you find most comfortable.


Thanks for your comment, I suppose must of the tone is in your fingers and I play a very bend heavy BB King, Jimmy Page esque style; maybe 8's will work out fine for me..


Cheers
#7
Quote by MrFlibble
It's very hard to hear any difference between such similar string gauges. When you jump from .09s to .11s you can hear a little difference on the 5th and 6th strings but you'll struggle to hear any difference on the other four. Comparing .09s and .12s directly will show up a more obvious difference, but even then it's nothing ground breaking Going from .09s to .08s is next to nothing and unless you get two absolutely identical guitars with the same set up through the same amp and compare the two gauges that way at the same time, you probably won't notice any difference.

Of all the things that effect your tone, string gauge is way down on the list. Personally, I'd even put it below pickguard material. Your playing comfort and ease should be a much higher priority for you; use the string gauge that you find most comfortable.

There's an effect when you are in low tunings. Higher tension strings tend to not mud up the way low tension strings do. a .066" in Ab sounds a LOT better than a .056" in B.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#8
Can definitely feel the difference between 8s, 9s and 10s. Maybe not a giant difference in fretting a note, but a big difference in bending a note, especially on the unwound strings. There is definitely a difference in sound as well. It's not going to be a factor that makes or breaks your sound but its going to be noticeable, especially between the gauges 8-10. I don't like strings smaller than a 10-46. The unwound strings sound too twangy because their is too little tension on them, and lower, wound strings lack low end and fullness. Maybe if you are playing through high gain amps or something it's not that noticeable, but for me, playing through a clean or slightly overdriven Fender amp most of the time, it's enough that I stick with 10s on strat and 11s on my les paul.
Last edited by al112987 at Jan 24, 2012,
#9
As the guy above me said, personally I don't like going below 10-46 in standard tuning. I definitely noticed a big difference first time I ever put a set of 10's on a guitar. I've been meaning to try 11's for awhile since I mostly play in drop C# now. Will you hear a difference? Probably thinner, possibly brighter and a bit twangier which sounds like it might actually be a good thing for you, but for me it would be like playing on floss even in standard. I mean it can't hurt to try seeing how strings aren't that expensive and if you don't like them you can always go back to your normal set.
#10
No significant difference
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#11
Quote by MrFlibble
It's very hard to hear any difference between such similar string gauges. When you jump from .09s to .11s you can hear a little difference on the 5th and 6th strings but you'll struggle to hear any difference on the other four. Comparing .09s and .12s directly will show up a more obvious difference, but even then it's nothing ground breaking Going from .09s to .08s is next to nothing and unless you get two absolutely identical guitars with the same set up through the same amp and compare the two gauges that way at the same time, you probably won't notice any difference.

Of all the things that effect your tone, string gauge is way down on the list. Personally, I'd even put it below pickguard material. Your playing comfort and ease should be a much higher priority for you; use the string gauge that you find most comfortable.


I completely disagree with the second paragraph. String gauge is only below pickups when determining raw tone. It's basic physics: thicker string = more mass = more magnetic pull on pickups = more output. Whether or not that actually translates to a "fuller" tone does depend on your setup. A tube amp paired with single coils will make the difference much more discernible while an SS modeling amp paired with active humbuckers will virtually eliminate any change.

I do, however, agree that for any setup, a move from 9's to 8's would barely elicit an audible difference. I also agree with your point that comfort should be the highest priority when choosing string gauge, but most of us simply do not have a choice when drop tuning.
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#12
^ I recall BB King telling someone (famous) that they should stop working so hard on 11s when chasing the tone dragon as he plays on 8s and sounds beastly.

Sort your setup out and play what's comfortable for you. No-one's really going to hear the difference.

Also roundcore strings supposedly feel a bit slacker than their equally thick hexcore brothers. I noticed a little difference when I made the switch.
#13
Quote by Duv
^ I recall BB King telling someone (famous) that they should stop working so hard on 11s when chasing the tone dragon as he plays on 8s and sounds beastly.

Sort your setup out and play what's comfortable for you. No-one's really going to hear the difference.


Quote by RR3tran
I also agree with your point that comfort should be the highest priority when choosing string gauge, but most of us simply do not have a choice when drop tuning.


By all means, use lighter gauge strings if it makes you more comfortable. But you can't exactly use 8's when tuning a guitar to Dropped B and sound beastly.
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#14
Quote by Duv
^ I recall BB King telling someone (famous) that they should stop working so hard on 11s when chasing the tone dragon as he plays on 8s and sounds beastly.

Sort your setup out and play what's comfortable for you. No-one's really going to hear the difference.

Also roundcore strings supposedly feel a bit slacker than their equally thick hexcore brothers. I noticed a little difference when I made the switch.

he told Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top), and he was right :P
Personally i hear a huge difference between 8s, 9s, 10s, and 11s
#15
Quote by RR3tran
By all means, use lighter gauge strings if it makes you more comfortable. But you can't exactly use 8's when tuning a guitar to Dropped B and sound beastly.
Considering OP mentions BB King and Jimmy Page, I think it's safe to say they're not going to be too worried about tuning to Drop B.


Quote by italiarlz135
he told Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top), and he was right :P
IIRC, Billy actually only uses the .08s for a few open tunings now.

... He uses .07s for standard tuning!
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#16
Quote by italiarlz135
he told Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top), and he was right :P
Personally i hear a huge difference between 8s, 9s, 10s, and 11s


That's the one. Was going to annoy me if I didn't find out!

Quote by MrFlibble
Considering OP mentions BB King and Jimmy Page, I think it's safe to say they're not going to be too worried about tuning to Drop B.


IIRC, Billy actually only uses the .08s for a few open tunings now.

... He uses .07s for standard tuning!


Christ almighty, didn't even know you could get strings that thin!
#18
Despite all of the very compelling and informative postings thus far; I would like to mention that the lighter the string set, the easier, and more highly likely it will be, to pull notes out of pitch during normal playing.

On clean passages, there should be a much more audible difference between heavy and light strings, than there would be using a lot of distortion.
#21
i woudn't get 8's personally. 9's will bend more than most people need them to. i play .11's and i can bend three semitones up easily on a 25.5" scale, i am sure if i needed to i could get the forth semitone i could, however...

i am all about playing for comfort, but IMO .08's are a little extreme. i happen to be most comfortable with .11's, but that doesn't mean that would be the same for you or anybody else.

its harmless to pick up a set of 8's and put them on there. worst case you are out $5. best case scenario you found something you like more.
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