#1
So I'm two years in, and when I say my progress at this point is depressing I mean it.

I'll keep it as short as possible. I took lessons about two years ago, but my mind since my childhood can't help but wander and most of what my teacher said went one ear and out the other.

I tried using UG as a reference and settled down with justinguitar.com, but most of the beginner stuff is actually quite tedious. Why? Because most of the basic stuff I do know like the notes of the neck, basic chords, but when you mention a simple word like diatonic I'm at a loss. Then I kind of went ahead of myself because at one point during my lessons with my teacher (keep in mind he had no idea I really wasn't paying attention) I heard the modes for the first time and my interest rose again. You can see how that screwed me up later on.

Its been months since I had a lesson, and all I can do is play an e minor pentatonic over and over, power chord, blah blah generic blah blah. PATHETIC, and quite frustrating actually, because now I really want to learn and expand my musical prowess, write my own stuff, eventually join a band, and actually understand everything I play, but I feel like I've thrown myself in a musical black hole and my brain will never truly compensate theory and really grasp the foundations of it.

Its probably a simple question with a simple answer, but how do I get back in the groove here? I finally founded the passion I have for this instrument but my common sense is getting the better of me, do I start all over or what?
#2
Sit down and study.
Unless you have ADHD or anything similar you are just being lazy.
Include 1 hour on theory on your guitar practice routine. Do it everyday!
Whats so hard about it ?
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#3
So you tried learning before but werent really paying attention...that means you weren't really interested in learning, presumably because you were impatient and just wanted to get on with the "interesting" stuff...like modes

Now you've realised it doesn't work that way, there's no shortcuts and you're ready to out some donkey work in? Go do it then, there's nothing stopping you, sounds like your only problem has been disinterest and laziness and if you're past that it's all good.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Well that was a simple enough answer lol, guess I overreacted a little.

I actually do for the record have ADHD (the inattentive type as well) but with meds its almost non-existent and shouldn't be used as an excuse.

Just a side question, would taking classes in college on music theory be a good thing or is that generally something that can screw over people?
#5
learning theory is never a bad thing, whether it be in college or on your own. i think learning it from someone who knows what they are talking about (like the instructor in college for example) is better than learning off of the internet where a lot of the information is misguided.

as far as the money goes with college, if my school offered a music theory class, i would take it in a heartbeat. money well spent if you are a musician.

so yea, taking music theory in college is only going to expand your knowledge, not hinder it
keep writing. keep dreaming.

keep the notes coming...

ibanez ftw
#6
you ever learnt scales and arpeggios? learn C major and look at some arpeggios. this should get you started with continuing your playing and also basic theory.
#7
Quote by Malice26
Well that was a simple enough answer lol, guess I overreacted a little.

I actually do for the record have ADHD (the inattentive type as well) but with meds its almost non-existent and shouldn't be used as an excuse.

Just a side question, would taking classes in college on music theory be a good thing or is that generally something that can screw over people?


Hhh the professor i work for has/had ADHD too and he is now in charge of an University ADHD clinic and in charge of a lot of research (omega fatty acids as etc..)
So it could be harder for you, but you will manage it if you put in the effort, i guarantee it


Anything you stumble upon will be helpful.
It is 100x easier if you have a legit interest for it though, e.g if you think you can use it.
As soon as thoughts of boredom or daydreeming start creeping in, pull back to it..

Its up to you how fast or slow you learn it, you can sit down for 1 month and devour countless books, or do 10 minutes every morning and every night for months.. (whatever works best for you mate)

Best wishes
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
#8
Quote by Malice26
Well that was a simple enough answer lol, guess I overreacted a little.

I actually do for the record have ADHD (the inattentive type as well) but with meds its almost non-existent and shouldn't be used as an excuse.

Just a side question, would taking classes in college on music theory be a good thing or is that generally something that can screw over people?

Nope, getting some formal training in theory is a brilliant idea as that's arguably the hardest thing to get your head round on your own.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#9
Btw- just go to the classes if you are going to pay attention, if not.. youre better off on your own working at your own pace. Waste of time to drive there and back only to sit there in a vegetative state :P

Do not make the mistake of thinking that now that you have this extremely high quality "book,software,course,teacher" everythnig will sort itself on its own.
Even if you revive Mozart and ask him to teach you, wont do anything if you do not have the desire to learn :P It´s your mind that you have to work on.

As for memorizing and increasing your attention skills, check out mmemonics, theres a Book by Harry Loraine about memory "tricks" and retaining virtually anything you want. Some bits are insanely helpful. e.g: it will teach you to retain 12+ digit numbers and it is as easy as substituting numbers with letters and forming words..
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Jan 26, 2012,
#10
Try working out your favourite records by ear from the CD. It's hard, but you will learn loads and improve your ear.

In fact Justin Sandercoe himself, on his site, says it is the single most important and valuable lesson on his site.
#11
If you are truly ready to get serious and start chopping (bad terminology I know), sit down and seriously practice the instrument. Consider getting a good teacher, as this is a really good investment. If you're not serious, just keep it at a "mild hobby" level, otherwise it'll just stress you out! But I'd encourage you to go forward with it, guitar is a lot of fun. Once you get past the first stage of learning, things gradually become easier and more fun because you have a better understanding of the instrument.
Cheers!
Satellites+Stars

P.S. No need to feel depressed! Success and improvement doesn't happen overnight, and just takes longer for some people. Just don't use that as an excuse! . Take care!
#12
Appreciate all the helpful comments guys, means alot. I'm practicing alot more then I used to and am being a little more serious then I was. We'll see where it goes from here.