#1
I'm a guitarist and I'm looking into getting a used bass primarily for home recording. My music is a combo of Smashing Pumpkins, Nirvana, Radiohead, REM, Sonic Youth, NIN, etc. I'm thinking a Fender Jazz Bass but wanted to know what other good options were out there.
Gear
  • 2004 Am. Strat
  • 2004 Mex. Tele
  • 2005 Esteve Classical

  • Vox Valvetronix AD15VT w/ foot switch

  • Vox 847
  • EH Stereo Polychorus
  • Ibanez TS-808
  • EH Big Muff Germanium 4
  • EH Small Clone
  • EH Small Stone (USA Ver 2)
  • EH LPB-1
  • PlusEBow
#2
I use a Squier P bass in my studio for recording only. It never leaves and I never do anything with it but record but it's held up really well so far. Pretty clear tone and with the right EQ and midi instruments I can make it sound like anything I want.

The jazz and P bass are slightly different but if you like the jazz I'd go there.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#3
A Jazz or Precision will cover a range of tones. A P-bass is pretty standard (in a good way). It records well and fits in nicely with a diverse range of music.
#4
i always recommend the yamaha rbx series. i have the 270 and have nothing but praise for it - added to the fact i like having the 24 frets. elitist me.
DONT RISK IT, BUY A BASS AMP
#5
Thanks foe the replies. Could anyone elaborate on the differences between a Jazz and a P?
Gear
  • 2004 Am. Strat
  • 2004 Mex. Tele
  • 2005 Esteve Classical

  • Vox Valvetronix AD15VT w/ foot switch

  • Vox 847
  • EH Stereo Polychorus
  • Ibanez TS-808
  • EH Big Muff Germanium 4
  • EH Small Clone
  • EH Small Stone (USA Ver 2)
  • EH LPB-1
  • PlusEBow
#6
A jazz bass has a thinner neck and in general a more growly tone.
Precisions have a chunky neck with a warmer tone.
That being said though, both can do either and I'd say it's more a game of preferences.
#7
P bass has a bucker while the jazz has two singles. The neck is also a little fatter on a P bass. Sort of a les paul vs a strat kind of thing with the tone and feel, except not to the same degree.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#8
P bass for everything on you list but Radiohead (and p can do that sometimes) and NiN, and the Jazz would handle those fine.

I'd say you sound like more of a p-bass person overall, but you could get a p or j-bass special with a p pickup in the middle and a jazz at the bridge and get a little more "tight" articulate sound for when you need it. Either way, a basic passive fender design should serve you well as these folks have suggested.

If you're using it for home recording, you probably also want a cheap bass DI: one of the few really nice things behringer makes is a sansamp bass DI clone, the BDI21. A lot of sights were clearing out a Seymour duncan bass DI for around $50 here (though word is it's a bit noisy). Or you could just use a mic preamp strip as a bass channel if you're going to have one for recording anyway. There are a lot of other options at or above the $100 range too--and if you find a nicely built squier bass you'll save enough money to get a good DI.
#9
I'm running everything direct cleanly into Logic with the intent of later reamping. The other thing I wonder about is what is most likely to sit well in the mix with my Strat and Tele. Obviously what amps get used later make a huge difference, but my amp choice varies widely.
Gear
  • 2004 Am. Strat
  • 2004 Mex. Tele
  • 2005 Esteve Classical

  • Vox Valvetronix AD15VT w/ foot switch

  • Vox 847
  • EH Stereo Polychorus
  • Ibanez TS-808
  • EH Big Muff Germanium 4
  • EH Small Clone
  • EH Small Stone (USA Ver 2)
  • EH LPB-1
  • PlusEBow
#10
Quote by ns9977a
I'm running everything direct cleanly into Logic with the intent of later reamping. The other thing I wonder about is what is most likely to sit well in the mix with my Strat and Tele. Obviously what amps get used later make a huge difference, but my amp choice varies widely.


Sounds like you're good to go if you already have a good interface and Logic. Old school Jazz and P are literally the easiest basses to bring into the mix with almost any set up. The P has a huge mid hump and stands out from everything no matter what you do (in a good way). The Jazz can be a little harder to dial in, but if you have any experience mixing, you're not going to have any trouble getting it to sit well in the mix after 5 minutes of screwing around.

If you do use a lot of different amp set ups in logic, I may take back what I said before and suggest the jazz over the P--you'll have a little more variety and wiggle room with it. It just sounds, from your list, that the P sound is what's foremost in your head.
Last edited by dullsilver_mike at Jan 25, 2012,
#11
As most have said, P-Bass or J-Bass for sure. I personally only record with passive pickups ever, as well. They'll help keep a solid tone throughout.
#12
Little bit of a Hi-jack of this thread but I am looking for the same thing. Are Squier Bronco's any good for this propose?
Gear:
----------------------
Jack and Danny Brothers Ls-5
Ibanez Gsa 60
----------------------
Zoom g9.2tt (for sale (NL))
----------------------
Blackheart Little Giant
#13
Quote by niels-uiterwaal
Little bit of a Hi-jack of this thread but I am looking for the same thing. Are Squier Bronco's any good for this propose?


With a single single coil, they are less dynamic than a j-bass and don't have the sound of a p-bass. I can't attest to the new VM series bronco, but the old squier one does not have all that good of build quality or electronics. I'd say it's a total miss unless you find one dirt cheap used somewhere as a mod platform.
#14
Quote by dullsilver_mike
With a single single coil, they are less dynamic than a j-bass and don't have the sound of a p-bass. I can't attest to the new VM series bronco, but the old squier one does not have all that good of build quality or electronics. I'd say it's a total miss unless you find one dirt cheap used somewhere as a mod platform.


Ahem, Broncos are quite good. Most serious modders do little more than change the pickup. The tuners stay in tune and the bridge works for me 2 saddles is just fine with patience.

The stock pickup is a plain strat pickup, argue all you want, but it is fine. if you could see a picture of the magnets power, you'd see it exerts enough influence over that small area to still be a good even sound. That said, it's a thinner sound, maybe not a standout sound, but works fine for keeping the groove.

I got mine for 90, and added a gfs 10k hotrails pickup, and a fixed .0015 cap, switchable .047, and a tone knob with .033 for some tonal variety. While you are right it's not a P or a Jazz bass, it's still a very nice bass, that growls and stands out bright and clanky, or drops down to a dubby behind the mix sound.

If you are in the market for a great recording bass, with a little money it makes a great bass about $130 all said and done. A used Squier P would set you back maybe $30-$100 depending on the deal you snag. I've had several and never paid over $40.
#15
Quote by askrere
Ahem, Broncos are quite good. Most serious modders do little more than change the pickup. The tuners stay in tune and the bridge works for me 2 saddles is just fine with patience.

The stock pickup is a plain strat pickup, argue all you want, but it is fine. if you could see a picture of the magnets power, you'd see it exerts enough influence over that small area to still be a good even sound. That said, it's a thinner sound, maybe not a standout sound, but works fine for keeping the groove.

I got mine for 90, and added a gfs 10k hotrails pickup, and a fixed .0015 cap, switchable .047, and a tone knob with .033 for some tonal variety. While you are right it's not a P or a Jazz bass, it's still a very nice bass, that growls and stands out bright and clanky, or drops down to a dubby behind the mix sound.

If you are in the market for a great recording bass, with a little money it makes a great bass about $130 all said and done. A used Squier P would set you back maybe $30-$100 depending on the deal you snag. I've had several and never paid over $40.


I'm just speaking from personal experience, I've never handled one that felt solid with a nice fit. I'm not dogging on strat pickups in a bass in general either, I'm saying that having one single coil is less dynamic than a jazz and won't get the uumph of a split P. I am specifically dogging on squier (standard and affinity) electronics though. I always replace squier and MiM pots when I change pups because they feel flimsy to me and I've had a few "strip out" I usually change the pickups (not that you don't get lucky sometimes) because they're often pretty bleh. Standards MiM pups have never treated me well either.
#16
I'm in the boat of "if its not broke don't fix it" and most bronco users are as well. Don't get me wrong modding and tweaking is fun as the afternoon sun, but limited funds make me focus on exactly what i need. I never understood pot discrimination (dank and schwag are both fine) mini pots, big pots stock pots what ever. I like squire pots because they are tiny :p more room to mod. In thus case i did go with some new pots only because I prefer 500k audio pots for even taper and more tonal variation.

I think for a guitarist just making jam tracks or simple recordings should consider them, they are solid, but anything is solid in a studio. Also if a guys asking for a $100 bass he obviously isn't too worried about tone over just adding a low end compliment.
#17
Quote by dullsilver_mike

If you're using it for home recording, you probably also want a cheap bass DI: one of the few really nice things behringer makes is a sansamp bass DI clone, the BDI21. .


Fo' reals that exists?

Is it any good? =S


Quote by askrere

I think for a guitarist just making jam tracks or simple recordings should consider them, they are solid, but anything is solid in a studio. Also if a guys asking for a $100 bass he obviously isn't too worried about tone over just adding a low end compliment.


This IS an option: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLK-1Q4qzwc
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at Jan 27, 2012,
#18
Quote by ChemicalFire
Fo' reals that exists?

Is it any good? =S



This IS an option: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLK-1Q4qzwc


There was one in my local craigslist for $25, almost got it but had to go out of town.

They seem nice, but look flimsy compared to the sansamp. in a studio where it's on a desk and not being stomped it'd be fine, or as an always on pedal, but on off through out shows or practice would be not so nice.