#1
Hi,

These guitars just came out a few months ago, I think around Novermber last year, and I reckon they look pretty cool and I'm considering getting one, but because they are new, it's really hard to find reviews and opinions on them. Has anyone owned one and what did you think of it? Is it worth getting this over an Epiphone Dot?

#2
These are essentially upgraded versions of the Dot. They've got some new cosmetic appointments (split diamond, binding, gold hardware), better pickups, and the trem units. I've only played one Dot in my life (not too many lefty ones hanging in stores), and it seemed like a well built instrument, resonated well, stayed in tune when I played it, and everything electronically worked, though the pickups were lacking a bit.

Epiphones are actually not bad guitars if you're looking at the mid to higher end ones. I recently got an Epi Les Paul Custom I'm pretty happy with. It's certainly no Gibson, but it's going to be a great guitar anyway. I've always felt that the playing is more to do with the player, not the guitar being played.

I too had trouble with reviews, I went to sites to look, but you can't always trust those. And HC doesn't have a whole lot on newer guitars yet. If you order a guitar from a place like Sweetwater, they actually inspect it before it's sent. Guitars and stuff over 200 I think. So you wouldn't have to worry about it being a total lemon. Even other sites that don't, like Musicians Friend, ZZounds, and others still have a generous return policy should you not like it. My advice is if you want one, go for it. You have options available to you should you decide it's not the guitar for you.
Last edited by Fenderexpx50 at Jan 26, 2012,
#3
How would something like this compare to something like a Fender Standard Strat (which is in a similar price range)? I mostly play indie rock like Arctic Monkeys, Oasis, The Strokes, The Libertines, Radiohead etc. Both the Fender Strats and ES-style guitars seem to be pretty popular in this genre.
Last edited by Fedoricecream at Jan 27, 2012,
#4
they dont,

though the 345 allows for alot of tonal options.

if your in the uk and looking to get one, drop me a PM mate.

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#5
A Fender Strat and a Epiphone 345 or 355 are two very different animals. If you're talking quality wise, both should be good instruments. I've had a few MIM Strats and they were good guitars for the money. The Dot I played was nice, but I haven't seen or played one of these new ones.

With a Strat, you have the ability to have a humbucker and single coils. However, the Epi will give you that semi hollow sound that a Fender can't deliver, nor could any solid body guitar.
#6
Quote by Fenderexpx50

With a Strat, you have the ability to have a humbucker and single coils.


I think the epi has coil tap/split (dont recall which one)
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#7
Yeah I know they are like completely different. I was wondering which one would be better for my style of music, though I guess both would be ok as I've seen both guitars played before in the sort of bands I like. I'll probably end up having both at some point, but might start with the es-345.
#8
All non-MIJ Epiphone hollowbodies I played so far sounded pretty dead acoustically, especially for a semi-hollow.
Fender American Special HSS Stratocaster
Ibanez 1987 Roadstar II Deluxe
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Ibanez WD-7 Weeping Demon Wah
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Seymour Duncan Tweakfuzz
#9
I've owned a couple of Epi Hollow (semi Hollow) bodies...

I had an Epi Dot Studio that was my main guitar for over a year... wanted a bigsby, so I sold the Dot to my Rhythm Guitar player, and bought a P-93 Riviera Ltd. I Love it. Tends to feed back a lot on small stages when you have to stand right in front of the amp, but if you've got a little room, she sings beautifully. The bigsby stays in tune once the strings are stretched out, and the finish is flawless...

And I never trust reviews... especially those that start out with "Just got the guitar today" or "My parents bought it for me for Christmas and my only complaint is that I had to take it in to have it tuned..." Yea.. I don't trust 'em either...

Epi's are solid guitars for the money... it's not a Gibson, but it ain't bad...
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#10
Quote by Papabear505
I've owned a couple of Epi Hollow (semi Hollow) bodies...

I had an Epi Dot Studio that was my main guitar for over a year... wanted a bigsby, so I sold the Dot to my Rhythm Guitar player, and bought a P-93 Riviera Ltd. I Love it. Tends to feed back a lot on small stages when you have to stand right in front of the amp, but if you've got a little room, she sings beautifully. The bigsby stays in tune once the strings are stretched out, and the finish is flawless...

And I never trust reviews... especially those that start out with "Just got the guitar today" or "My parents bought it for me for Christmas and my only complaint is that I had to take it in to have it tuned..." Yea.. I don't trust 'em either...

Epi's are solid guitars for the money... it's not a Gibson, but it ain't bad...


Yeah, I don't trust the average user review too much, but I was interested in seeing professional reviews like those ones from Musicradar, but obviously, you have no idea when those reviews might come out.

By the way, I really like the p93 Riviera too, it has to be one of best looking guitars I've seen.
#11
Quote by JKHC
I think the epi has coil tap/split (dont recall which one)


The tap and split is really the same thing. That's a really nice feature on a guitar. I had that on my X-50 before I went active in it. It was nice, but I really like the alder body/maple neck setup with single coils. I think they sound better that way. It sounded good in my Washburn, but I think I've just used Fender guitars so long that I've just equated single coils with that type of guitar. But again, it's really just my ears on that. I really do like that feature though.

The thing about reviews is you need to be able to contextually sort them out. Figure out what is BS and what is actually true. Some are written by beginners who don't quite know what they're talking about. Some are written right after purchase, in that glowing phase where the product has no wrongs. Reviews are a great tool, but like any good tool, they do come with a price.