#1
I've recently started taking a music theory class in high school. Because I am used to doing things by ear or tab, I'm not used to reading notation. Are there any tips for getting better at basically sight reading from different clefs and everything?
#2
practice, honestly. that's about all you can do. get your clefs memorized and associate notes with the notes on the fretboard, then go through a heap of sheet music. even if it's just doing it once a week, grab a score, play it on your instrument of choice (guitar in this case) sightreading (scan it for a minute or so, then play it to a metronome or something), then learn it as best you can if you messed something up to adjust and learn from your mistake.
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Last edited by Hail at Jan 26, 2012,
#3
Practice makes perfect. It really isn't that hard. It takes a little getting used to though. Take that from at guitarist having gone through the same situation as you.
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#4
Quote by Ginge93
Practice makes perfect. It really isn't that hard. It takes a little getting used to though. Take that from at guitarist having gone through the same situation as you.


This. It also helps majorly to be able to recognize instantly the notes that correspond with open strings in standard tuning. (assuming you play guitar)

Like knowing that the top space on the treble clef is E. But not any E, it is the open high E string (or, alternatively, 5th fret B string or any fret/string combo that gives the same pitch).
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#6
Alright thanks guys. It's good to know it is possible :P any suggestions for a way to practice during a class or something?
#7
not really, unless you want to hum to yourself along with sheet music, or draw diagrams or whatever. nothing can really replace a stand, some staff paper, and a guitar all being used at once.
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#8
Quote by eGraham
This. It also helps majorly to be able to recognize instantly the notes that correspond with open strings in standard tuning. (assuming you play guitar)

Like knowing that the top space on the treble clef is E. But not any E, it is the open high E string (or, alternatively, 5th fret B string or any fret/string combo that gives the same pitch).
Whoa! This is only true of music written specifically written for guitar. For the rest of the orchestra, it's dead wrong.

Guitar music is written one octave HIGHER than it sounds!

This is so it can be written across the treble ("G") clef only. If a piano player were to read the "E" in the top space of the G clef, he would interpret that as ...., (wait for it) the "E" above high "C"!

Middle "C" for guitar is written as the note in the 2nd space below the top line of the G clef.

Music written for the guitar can also be interpreted as the melody line for a baritone singer. Here again, you avoid reading 2 lines of music. Although for baritone, most of the part would be on the bass (F) clef.

Were it not for the written octave shift upward, the 4 lowest strings of the guitar would be on the F clef also. ( And yes, I'm talking about played open, or only up to the 5th fret).

A soprano can also sing the melody line from guitar music, but she will be singing the note's that are actually written.

In this example, the baritone is sounding notes a octave lower than they are written, and in essence, matching the guitar.

Middle "C" is actually on a line BETWEEN the G and F (bass) clef. It's right in the middle twixt those 2 clefs, and that's why they call it, "middle C".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 26, 2012,
#9
The people I know who can sight-play music can sight-play because they can sight-sing. You read the music, not as a series of note names but as a sound - and you know how to play that sound. That means learning to read music is really about developing your ear.
#11
It really necessary to learn to read from notes? Because I've practiced note-reading for a 2 months or so, deemed it not as useful as others and abandoned it. :/
#12
@ Captaincranky, I did specify that that was for the guitar. But thank you for clarifying that, it could've been easily missed.

And Luxeion, many people will argue that it's not worth the time--it differs person to person. I, personally, value the ability to read sheet music to gain a better understand of music, not just an instrument. It's also universal, in that you can use the same clef full of notes on any instrument.
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#13
Yes, you've got to practise, practise and practise. It will soon come, the younger you are the quicker you'll pick it up. I've come to a stage where I can sightread music quicker and easier than reading words.

Music is my first Language, English my second
#14
Quote by geo1450
Yes, you've got to practise, practise and practise. It will soon come, the younger you are the quicker you'll pick it up. I've come to a stage where I can sightread music quicker and easier than reading words.

Music is my first Language, English my second

I'm jealous. I hope I reach that stage some day
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~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#15
Quote by eGraham
I'm jealous. I hope I reach that stage some day


It came with time, my primary instrument is clarinet, so playing in County Orchestras every week for over 5 years helped a lot to read music fast and not just read the notes but the dynamics, articulation and performance directions. So when I picked up Guitar reading music was the easy bit

But it is practise, the key to everything, the more you do it the better you get