#1
I am trying to record some acoustic stuff i wrote and was wondering if it is best to use one mic to record or two. I currently only have one mic a Shure sm-57, do most people who record acoustic work use a condenser mic on top of an instrument mic whilst playing and singing or do they lay the guitar down then track vocals or vice versa?
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#2
You can do whatever works best for you, some people sing and play together the best, and yes condenser, sm-57 really wouldn't do for either the guitar or the vocals. A matched pair of condensers for the guitar and a large diaphragm condenser for vocals
#3
Buy a large diaphragm condenser, find a nice sounding room and go nuts, this'll give you a large vocal sound and a beautiful bell like guitar sound (depending on the guitar/strings of course.)

Sadly the last is hard to come by, thus close micing the two tracks separately is normally preferable.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#4
In an ideal situation, you would use a couple of large-diaphragm condensors that provide a figure-8 polar pattern.

One would have the front of the mic pointing at the guitar, with the side of the microphone (the null) pointing toward the voice. Doing this will cause the voice to be picked up very, very little in the microphone.

Do the opposite for the other figure-8 mic - facing at the vocal and the null pointing towards the guitar.

The last single acoustic guitar and vocal I recorded was with my 11-year old daughter singing. I didn't yet have my matched pair of condensors (SP C4's), which I wanted to try similar to what sar8777 was suggesting.

So we did this:
-LD condensor back about four feet in the room - my daughter and I played the song together. (her singing, me playing) This gave us the natural feel of a live performance.
-using headphones, she listened to the performance of us together and sang the lead vocal. (used an SM7b)
-using headphones, I listened back and overdubbed my guitar again, miked with the LD condensor (Rode NT-1
-get rid of the original guide track.

Turned out pretty decent:
www.greenroomrecording.ca/Fireflies.mp3

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
I've always recorded acoustic and vocals in the same take.

The key is all mic placement, and as chris said you can use ribbon mics to make it real easy to accomplish it. You can do it with out them of course.

Generally I use 3 mics to do a singer/acoustic guitar set up. I'll have them sit on a nice comfy drum stool. Have a large diaphragm condenser about a foot away and up from the sound hole, and then angle it down a little. Then a small diaphragm condenser about 5 inches above the neck, pointed down at the neck around the 10th-12th frets. Then another LDC positioned to the right of of the persons head, so they have to turn their head about 30º to the right. This way the voice is projecting away from the SDC and LDC.
#6
Quote by axemanchris
In an ideal situation, you would use a couple of large-diaphragm condensors that provide a figure-8 polar pattern.

One would have the front of the mic pointing at the guitar, with the side of the microphone (the null) pointing toward the voice. Doing this will cause the voice to be picked up very, very little in the microphone.

Do the opposite for the other figure-8 mic - facing at the vocal and the null pointing towards the guitar.

The last single acoustic guitar and vocal I recorded was with my 11-year old daughter singing. I didn't yet have my matched pair of condensors (SP C4's), which I wanted to try similar to what sar8777 was suggesting.

So we did this:
-LD condensor back about four feet in the room - my daughter and I played the song together. (her singing, me playing) This gave us the natural feel of a live performance.
-using headphones, she listened to the performance of us together and sang the lead vocal. (used an SM7b)
-using headphones, I listened back and overdubbed my guitar again, miked with the LD condensor (Rode NT-1
-get rid of the original guide track.

Turned out pretty decent:
www.greenroomrecording.ca/Fireflies.mp3

CT

that sounds great man.
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#7
^ Thanks!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by sar8777
You can do whatever works best for you, some people sing and play together the best, and yes condenser, sm-57 really wouldn't do for either the guitar or the vocals. A matched pair of condensers for the guitar and a large diaphragm condenser for vocals


HAHAHHAHAHHAHAHA, "SM-57 really wouldn't do for either the guitar or the vocals." Made me laugh SO HARD. Not to be harsh, but come on man. It's practically MADE for guitar and if you ever listen to how it does vocals, you will drop a 58 in a heartbeat.
#9
Quote by andy13mc
HAHAHHAHAHHAHAHA, "SM-57 really wouldn't do for either the guitar or the vocals." Made me laugh SO HARD. Not to be harsh, but come on man. It's practically MADE for guitar and if you ever listen to how it does vocals, you will drop a 58 in a heartbeat.


Yeah, electric guitar, and no, I wouldn't, I like my vocals to not be thin and weak.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at Jan 29, 2012,
#10
Agree with Chemical here. A dynamic mic would be what I would use only after I have exhausted all of my possible combinations of condensors. ]

Electric guitar, definitely. Acoustic, no.

I had ONE singer I recorded who sounded wonderful with an SM58, and not with any of my other mics. However, one of those other mics I tried was an SM57. I have never recorded anyone with an SM57 in as long as I've had an option not to do so.

That said, never say never. However, I wouldn't even consider it as a first choice for recording.

Live, yes. I actually prefer the 57 over the 58 for live vocals. The 58 almost always just sounds wooly to me. But for recording, no.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.