#1
So, I've been looking at getting a halfstack, but I have a couple questions:
1) Can any head be plugged in with any cab?
2) If a head is say, had 30w and a cab 100w, is that quieter then say, a 100w head with a 100w cab?
#2
1: No, the head has to have equal, preferably lower wattage output than the cabinet is rated it, and the ohm's of the cab also have to match up.
2: The wattage rating of the cab will not effect the overall volume of the amp, that is all done by the power amp section. Though more speakers can create more sound, and thus "produce" more sound.
...
#3
Quote by Ghold125
1: No, the head has to have equal, preferably lower wattage output than the cabinet is rated it, and the ohm's of the cab also have to match up.
2: The wattage rating of the cab will not effect the overall volume of the amp, that is all done by the power amp section. Though more speakers can create more sound, and thus "produce" more sound.


To answer the question actually asked in 2,

Yes, a 100w head can drive the cab louder than the 30w head could. But it might not be as big a difference as you'd expect. Maybe you'd have the 30w head set to 4 whearas you might not go above 2 with the 100w head.

I've only had the master volume up to 10 on my 100w rig once, and it literally knocked tab books off the shelf. Normally it's between 2 and 3 for shows, and just barely crossing the line above silent for band practice (about 1.01) . And then I still tone it down with a volume pedal.

Much louder than 3 and you can't hear acoustic drums over it, or PA vocals without getting way too much feedback.

But that's at pretty small venues like bars; not theaters or anything like that. We mic'd the cab for a theater show and kept the volume around 2.
#4
...
1) Can any head be plugged in with any cab?.../QUOTE]

Here's more info on this question.

The most important thing is that the impedence matches. e.g., if it's an 8 ohm cab, then you have an 8 ohm output on the cab (or can switch it to 8 ohms if it's selectable).

Then, it's good to have higher wattage ratings on the speakers than the head, but not absolutely essential--depends on how much risk you're willing to accept and control.

For example, sometimes I plug my 100w head into a 30w cab, (like if I don't want to lug around the 4x12 cab, or the stage is too small), but I keep the volume around 2. Hypothetically, that's pumping way less than 30 watts into the speaker. If it pushes more than 30 watts into the speaker, then it could blow the speaker.

No problem or risk at all using a lower wattage head than the cab is rated for as long as the ohms match.
#5
Quote by Sullinger
So, I've been looking at getting a halfstack, but I have a couple questions:
1) Can any head be plugged in with any cab?
2) If a head is say, had 30w and a cab 100w, is that quieter then say, a 100w head with a 100w cab?

The answers above cover these things well.

Something to consider is that an awful lot of amps these days have a switch or different outputs for different cabinet ohms. Also, some cabinets offer the ability to switch this as well.

So between the two it's very likely you'll be good to go. Once you pick the head you like, just check the back to see what ohm output(s) it has. Then find a cabinet to match. You'll be good to go.
Richard

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#6
rule of thumb from my misspent younger days playing with car audio set ups. volume is measured in DB, 3 db is twice the volume. so something at 90db is loud, something at 93 is twice as loud.

To make your music twice as loud you need to either double the power your pushing the speakers with. so if you have a 30w amp at 10 (which you would probably never do) a 60w amp at 10 would be twice as loud.

The other way is to add more speakers, if you double the speaker area you double the volume, if you have a 1x12 with a 30w head at 10 you will have volume of lets say 90db. if you have a 2x12 with a 30w head at 10 you will have volume of 93db, same as if you had a 1x12 with a 60w head at ten.

If you had a 4x12 and a 30 w head at 10 then you would achieve 96db, same as if you had the 60w at ten running the 2x12.

then the big one, 60w head at 10 running the 4x12 = 99db


If its a valve head however you have the way it works to take into consideration. As Jetwash69 said, he doesn't go above 3 with a 100w head. There is just no need. At which volume his output tubes are barely breaking sweat.
I have a orange tunderverb 50, the reason I wanted the little baby version and not the massive 200w one is practicing I couldn't turn it past 1. With the 50w head, I get to turn the volume up and overdrive the output tubes.
#7
Quote by Cornishrob
...If its a valve head however you have the way it works to take into consideration. As Jetwash69 said, he doesn't go above 3 with a 100w head. There is just no need. At which volume his output tubes are barely breaking sweat.
I have a orange tunderverb 50, the reason I wanted the little baby version and not the massive 200w one is practicing I couldn't turn it past 1. With the 50w head, I get to turn the volume up and overdrive the output tubes.


Yeah, that's why I like the Marshall JVM. I get all the breakup I want in the pre-amp section. That one time I did crank the power amp didn't like relaease the Holy Grail or anything...the tone was the same, just earshatteringly, foundation-shaking loud. I'd also experimented with lower channel volume and higher master volume to drive the power amp instead of the pre-amp, but the tone was close enough that it wasn't worth it.

Sometimes, depending on the venue, I'll just leave the cab at home and plug the head's line out right into the house PA mixing board, and not even power up the power section at all (leave the amp on standby). In some venues that actually sounds better than playing through a cab; particularly if they're not micing the cabs. That tends to work better if they have stage monitors. If not, then it can be hard to hear myself.
#8
Quote by Cornishrob
rule of thumb from my misspent younger days playing with car audio set ups. volume is measured in DB, 3 db is twice the volume. so something at 90db is loud, something at 93 is twice as loud.

To make your music twice as loud you need to either double the power your pushing the speakers with. so if you have a 30w amp at 10 (which you would probably never do) a 60w amp at 10 would be twice as loud.

The other way is to add more speakers, if you double the speaker area you double the volume, if you have a 1x12 with a 30w head at 10 you will have volume of lets say 90db. if you have a 2x12 with a 30w head at 10 you will have volume of 93db, same as if you had a 1x12 with a 60w head at ten.

If you had a 4x12 and a 30 w head at 10 then you would achieve 96db, same as if you had the 60w at ten running the 2x12.

then the big one, 60w head at 10 running the 4x12 = 99db


If its a valve head however you have the way it works to take into consideration. As Jetwash69 said, he doesn't go above 3 with a 100w head. There is just no need. At which volume his output tubes are barely breaking sweat.
I have a orange tunderverb 50, the reason I wanted the little baby version and not the massive 200w one is practicing I couldn't turn it past 1. With the 50w head, I get to turn the volume up and overdrive the output tubes.

How does that make sense? if you double the speakers, the amplifier is not driving each speaker the same as a single speaker. You are dissipating the same amount of current across two loads.
#9
Quote by Cornishrob
rule of thumb from my misspent younger days playing with car audio set ups. volume is measured in DB, 3 db is twice the volume. so something at 90db is loud, something at 93 is twice as loud.

To make your music twice as loud you need to either double the power your pushing the speakers with. so if you have a 30w amp at 10 (which you would probably never do) a 60w amp at 10 would be twice as loud.

The other way is to add more speakers, if you double the speaker area you double the volume, if you have a 1x12 with a 30w head at 10 you will have volume of lets say 90db. if you have a 2x12 with a 30w head at 10 you will have volume of 93db, same as if you had a 1x12 with a 60w head at ten.

If you had a 4x12 and a 30 w head at 10 then you would achieve 96db, same as if you had the 60w at ten running the 2x12.

then the big one, 60w head at 10 running the 4x12 = 99db


If its a valve head however you have the way it works to take into consideration. As Jetwash69 said, he doesn't go above 3 with a 100w head. There is just no need. At which volume his output tubes are barely breaking sweat.
I have a orange tunderverb 50, the reason I wanted the little baby version and not the massive 200w one is practicing I couldn't turn it past 1. With the 50w head, I get to turn the volume up and overdrive the output tubes.

This is wrong on so many levels
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#10
Quote by al112987
How does that make sense? if you double the speakers, the amplifier is not driving each speaker the same as a single speaker. You are dissipating the same amount of current across two loads.


It's not all linear. But adding speakers does increas surface area to move more air.

Other factors include the size of the speakers and the materials they're made from. Also the construction, materials, and size of the cabinet.

When I use my 30w 1x10 cab, through the 100w head, I don't get the same decibels out of it as I get out of the the 4x10 cab at the same volume settings. It's a little quieter, but I haven't gotten around to measuring the difference with my decibel meter. Might not even bother. These days, if I'm not bringing the 4x12, then I just jack right into the PA, so not much call for bringing the small cab if the PA has enough inputs.

Since the head doesn't even fit in the new (to us) economy car, I'm not even bothering with that for jam sessions anymore; just plug the MFX directly into the house PA. It's a little sterile, but not a big enough difference to justify the extra gasoline, especially if when the venue is across town.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Jan 29, 2012,
#11
Okay, so the ohms HAVE to match up? I can't plug a 4 ohm head into a 8 ohm cabinet? And when I look around, they don't say how many ohms a head is...
#12
Quote by Sullinger
Okay, so the ohms HAVE to match up? I can't plug a 4 ohm head into a 8 ohm cabinet? And when I look around, they don't say how many ohms a head is...


Yes, they HAVE to match or you could blow out your speakers and/or the head. What head do you have in mind?
Last edited by jetwash69 at Jan 29, 2012,
#13
Quote by jetwash69
It's not all linear. But adding speakers does increas surface area to move more air.
Yes, but each speaker is moving less air compared to a single speaker being driven by more signal. Obviously more speakers moves air over a larger surface area, but each speaker is being driven with less force.

Sound is air moving in a longitudinal wave and volume is the amplitude of that wave... yes?

So if we are looking at a unit of air in front of a speaker, being pushed with X amount of force and oscillates with amplitude A, then I'm not seeing how having two units of air being pushed with X/2 amount of force results in twice the amplitude. Again, an amplifier only provides so much amount of signal to drive a speaker. Regardless of how many speakers you have. The amplifier only sees a 8 ohm load, whether that is one 8 ohm speaker or two 16 ohm speakers in parallel.
Last edited by al112987 at Jan 29, 2012,
#14
Quote by al112987
Yes, but each speaker is moving less air compared to a single speaker being driven by more signal. Obviously more speakers moves air over a larger surface area, but each speaker is being driven with less force.

Sound is air moving in a longitudinal wave and volume is the amplitude of that wave... yes?

So if we are looking at a unit of air in front of a speaker, being pushed with X amount of force and oscillates with amplitude A, then I'm not seeing how having two units of air being pushed with X/2 amount of force results in twice the amplitude.


Like I said, it's not linear. So the other guy was oversimplifying to a degree.

Overall, as long as the head is powerful enough to drive the speaker array, and there is more speaker surface area in that array than in the single speaker, then it will be louder coming from the array. You can use some math to estimate how much louder, but you'd need a lot of information to forecast it accurately.

It doesn't really matter anyway. Even my 5 watt solid state VOX DA5 is loud enough to be heard at close range over drums, and you can mic it to be heard throughout an entire venue through the PA if you need to.

So who really cares exactly how much louder a 4x12 cab would be over a single speaker? And why would they care? If you're an audio engineer trying to calculate speaker requirements for a venue, then you're hurting if you have to come to UG for advice...
#15
You keep saying "it is not linear," what is "it"?

dB is a quantitative measurement, it is a sound pressure level measurement, I'm not talking about perceived volume here, I'm talking about a measured amount of air movement. Breaking it down to the simplest terms and removing any possible confounders, it makes absolutely no sense for there to be twice the amount of volume by doubling the number of speakers.

Again, I'm not talking about perceived volume, I'm talking about actual SPLs here. A 4x12 is going to sound fuller and have more low end than a 2x12, no shit, the projection is different and the phase interference of certain frequencies is going to affect what you are going to hear, but those are confounders that have nothing to do with the volume (in terms of dB) and speaker area relationship.

I'm not trying to argue with you here, I'm not even trying to tell the other guy he is wrong, but to me, it has simply never made sense when people say something like "twice the speakers, twice the volume" and I'm curious for the reasoning behind that claim. Of course, I'm also not convinced that 3 dB equals "twice the volume," twice the volume? I don't think so... well unless you were starting out with 3 dB, then yes, going from 3 dB to 6 dB is twice the volume. Now, if someone wants to tell me that doubling the power coming from an amplifier driving the speaker increases the volume by 3 dB. I DO agree with that. Certainly, a 100 watt amp theoretically translates to 3 dB louder than a 50 watt amp, but again, wattage is not a measurement of volume, it's a measurement of power.
Last edited by al112987 at Jan 29, 2012,
#16
Quote by al112987
You keep saying "it is not linear," what is "it"? ...


It, being the relationships between number of speakers, surface area, watts, compared to output volume.

In the real world, you get loss through lots of different factors, so those theoretical equations are just oversimplifications and will never stand up to the test of a decibel meter. I.e., in modeling/simulation terms: they don't factor enough of the real variables involved to produce a model of useful fidelity.

Are you trying to tell us that you think 1x10 speaker is louder than 4x12 when driven by the same wattage?

I can go check it out with my decibel meter if that's your hypothesis.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Jan 29, 2012,
#17
Quote by al112987
...to me, it has simply never made sense when people say something like "twice the speakers, twice the volume" and I'm curious for the reasoning behind that claim.


I'm agreeing with you that "twice the speakers," does not equal "twice the volume" due to many factors. But it will be louder than 1 speaker, assuming you have enough power to drive both speakers. It's moving more air. It's somewhere between "louder" and "twice the volume"; my estimate would be closer to the "louder" side of the scale.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Jan 29, 2012,
#18
Quote by jetwash69
It, being the relationships between number of speakers, surface area, watts, compared to output volume.
Dude, you just threw out 4 factors there. "They" are all logarithmic?

In the real world, you get loss through lots of different factors, so those theoretical equations are just oversimplifications and will never stand up to the test of a decibel meter. I.e., in modeling/simulation terms: they don't factor enough of the real variables involved to produce a model of useful fidelity.
The guy said, double the speakers, increase 3 dB. The 3 dB is a completely arbitrary number. It doesn't equal "twice the volume". Two times the wattage driving the speaker will result in a 3 dB increase.

Are you trying to tell us that you think 1x10 speaker is louder than 4x12 when driven by the same wattage?'
Depends, if the 10 inch speaker is more sensitive than the 4x12, then yes, it is producing more dB per watt. You might not perceive that to you ears, because you don't hear decibels linearly (you perceive dBs logarithmically, if that was what you were getting at, but that's between volume and your ears, not between number of speakers and volume). If the 10 inch speaker is less sensitive than the 12 inch speaker, then no it wouldn't be louder.

I can go check it out with my decibel meter if that's your hypothesis.
Take two of the same speaker and measure the dB compared to one of the same speaker. If you remove the effects of the enclosure and the fact that a dB meter is not going to account for the distribution of air over different areas, then yes, I would say that you would not notice a significant difference.
#19
Quote by al112987
Dude, you just threw out 4 factors there. "They" are all logarithmic?
The guy said, double the speakers, increase 3 dB. The 3 dB is a completely arbitrary number. It doesn't equal "twice the volume". Two times the wattage driving the speaker will result in a 3 dB increase.
Depends, if the 10 inch speaker is more sensitive than the 4x12, then yes, it is producing more dB per watt. You might not perceive that to you ears, because you don't hear decibels linearly (you perceive dBs logarithmically, if that was what you were getting at, but that's between volume and your ears, not between number of speakers and volume). If the 10 inch speaker is less sensitive than the 12 inch speaker, then no it wouldn't be louder.
Take two of the same speaker and measure the dB compared to one of the same speaker. If you remove the effects of the enclosure and the fact that a dB meter is not going to account for the distribution of air over different areas, then yes, I would say that you would not notice a significant difference.


I think we agree that it's not as simple as the one guy was talking about because there are so many other unknowns.

As for the experiment you propose, it would be interesting, but the stuff I have at hand doesn't match your experiment.

I have an MG-30DFX (1x10) with the amp disconnected and the speaker hooked up to a jack so I can plug it into the seperate head. And I have a 1960a (4x12) cab. I'm not going to remove 2 of the speakers, build a cab for them, and then build a seperate cab for one of them to get decibel readings from them.

If you think the 1x10 in it's MG combo cab is louder then the 4x12, then I can check it out and report back to you. My perception from hearing it is that it isn't. Logically, I don't think it would be either, even though being rated at 30w, the 1x10 might be more sensitive than each of the 75w 12 watt speakers might be.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Jan 29, 2012,
#20
Quote by Sullinger
Okay, so the ohms HAVE to match up? I can't plug a 4 ohm head into a 8 ohm cabinet? And when I look around, they don't say how many ohms a head is...

Yes, they HAVE to match.

What amp are you looking at getting? This shouldn't be very difficult to sort out. Give a list of even 5 or 10 amps that you're interested in.
Richard

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#21
Quote by richardlpalmer
Yes, they HAVE to match.

What amp are you looking at getting? This shouldn't be very difficult to sort out. Give a list of even 5 or 10 amps that you're interested in.


no, they don't HAVE to match up. some amp manufacturers (most notably Mesa Boogie) actually list "safe mismatches" because often times intentional mismatches can produce tonal effects, with little to no chance of damage (this is largely dependent on the amp, always check your owners manual). for example, I almost always run my 16ohm speaker (switchable impedance cab) with an 8ohm output because it results in slightly less output and a darker sound (the result of the amp running cooler)
#22
Consider load mismatches (in ohms) to be a Bad Idea. Some amps will tolerate some mismatches, but unless you know more about your amp than most manufacturers are willing to tell you, you'd be foolish not to match the ohm resistances provided and expected.

There isn't anything close to a linear relationship between output wattage and perceived loudness. For example, Egnater makes amps that can be dialed between 1 and 30 watts. The perceived volume difference isn't very great - this is NOT an attenuator dial. The purpose of setting to one watt is to eliminate all your headroom, allowing power tubes to be overdriven at bedroom volume levels. In essence, this is a TONE dial.

Perceived volume (and tone) gets us into psychoacoustics. Most people listen to music with their ears, not with sound pressure meters or waveform analyzers. And the human eardrum is just this tiny little membrane, which is being asked to hear (vibrate in sympathy with) sounds put out by much much larger speaker cones. The whole auditory system comes into play, trying to interpret the eardrum's response in terms of volume and tone. The eardrum clips pretty easily, making the interpretation task all the more difficult.

Anyway, it's been a while since I've encountered anyplace to play that required all that much volume. A 20w amp with a 1x12 should be able to fill anyplace too small to have a PA system. It should also easily compete with the drums - and if it can't, get a new drummer!
#23
Okay, guys. Lets stop arguing. I was looking at a either a marshall MG100HCFX or MG100HDFX with a MG412A, but I learned the MG100HDFX will match with the MG412A...
#24
Quote by Sullinger
Okay, guys. Lets stop arguing. I was looking at a either a marshall MG100HCFX or MG100HDFX with a MG412A, but I learned the MG100HDFX will match with the MG412A...


No.

Marshall lesson #1: If it starts with MG, then leave it at the store.

The MG30DFX I bought with my first guitar (MIA Strat) was the worst waste of money I've ever had associated with musical instruments. The ones you're talking about are the same awful, muddy, sorry excuse for tone; just a lot louder.

Seriously, you're better off with a VOX DA5 5 watt amp than you are with anything from the MG line. Those just aren't real Marshalls. They might be the one thing on this planet worse than Line 6 Spiders. In fact, I heard a guy playing a Spider II at a show tonight and it sounded a lot better than any tone I've heard from any MG.

Not that I'd recommend a Spider either.

If you have to get a solid state half-stack, then conisder Peavey or the Fender Mustang IV. But really, you'd be better off with a Mustang III.
#25
Quote by Sullinger
Okay, guys. Lets stop arguing. I was looking at a either a marshall MG100HCFX or MG100HDFX with a MG412A, but I learned the MG100HDFX will match with the MG412A...

No! Bad Sullinger! Bad!

Check out the Fender Mustang series (the III is excellent) or the VOX VT series. There are also good offerings from Peavey and a host of others.
Richard

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#26
Quote by Sullinger
Okay, guys. Lets stop arguing. I was looking at a either a marshall MG100HCFX or MG100HDFX with a MG412A, but I learned the MG100HDFX will match with the MG412A...


you don't want any of those. that is the summation of the worst marshall products in the last decade.
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Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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#28
Quote by Sullinger
Lolololol, k. MG marshalls=shit. Any other halfstack suggestions?

If you have to get a solid state halfstack, then conisder Peavey or the Fender Mustang IV.

If you're set on Marshall, then a heavily used 1960 is the cab go for your budget.

I got my Marshall 4x12 (1960a, the slanted version) for $369 used. It's all beat up to hell. I wouldn't mess with any other Marshall 4x12s unless you had a much bigger budget. If you're getting used, make sure the speakers are OK and haven't been swapped out with crap speakers. They should be Celestion G12T-75W S88 (300 watts), Celestion G12 Vintage 70W S81 speakers. (280 watts), or Celestion G12 M-25W "green back" S58 speakers (100 watts) if it's fairly recent.

If you open it up and they say "MG" on the back, then run away!!!

I couldn't recommend any solid state Marshall head. I found my amp head (JVM 410h) at the same store as the cab; used for $1K. But normally they go for a lot more, even used. This one was on consignment and the seller had dropped the price a couple of times before I happened on it.

Others can give you advice on what Marshall head to get; the JVM has some great features, but I wouldn't have gotten it if it hadn't been such a steal. Overkill big time. Maybe a JCM 800 would be good for you. Most of the other models either cost way too much or receive a lot of criticism here at UG.

Are you sure you want to lug around a halfstack? They're way overkill for around the house. It won't fit in any of my vehicles (open truck bed doesn't count), and no camper tops for me. So unless we have to bring our own drums to shows, then the halfstack stays with the drums. Driving a full size pickup truck with a trailer uses a lot more gas than the small car; just not worth it. Not worth the load-in/out or setup/teardown time either. Much easier to jack the MFX pedal right into the PA and the tone isn't that much different.

Unless you drive a 4-door, a hatchback, or a van, you'd probably be better off with a Mustang III than with a half-stack.

You'll get more productive advice here if you list info such as:

Nearest large city
Style(s) of music you play (maybe list some bands/songs)
Guitars you'll use it with
Effects you'll use it with
Application (e.g., learning, practice, jamming w/friends, open mic, open jams, bar gigs, concerts)
#29
Ever consider looking at the Jet City JCA20?

It's valve, possibly in your price range and certainly loud enough.


Far, far better than any MG.
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#30
just to trow in for fun, back when i had my tweaker i would put it on the lowest gain putting out a tiny bit of sound, but literally dime the master. that was some nice powertube distortion, damn loud for a low wattage little amp sitting on a 2x12" but that got the powertubes cooking.
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Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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#31
^I've got the Tweaker 40 and using more often now than my AC30...
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#32
@ trashed... & Slap-happy,

The Tweakers are cool. Played on one at a Jam session a few weeks ago. I played the MFX through it mic'd. I'm sure it beat the hell out of the Roland cube it was sharing the stage with . It was kinda hard for me to hear over the drums, but I'm sure a little more tweaking would have fixed that. Or a better stage monitor mix. Anyway, the audience seemed to like it, and it was putting out 105 db all over the club through their PA.
#33
Jetwash is on the money heed his advice!!

I fell for the MG trap many years ago, is saw the black and gold and MARSHALL and assumed they were the job, they are not, there are MANY great amps (new and used!!) for the same price!! Solid state mustangs sound great and have lots of effects to keep you going till you get a pedals etc.

What do you want the amp for? gigging or practice? Is the half stack necessary? I have one and its a pain in the ass! I had to get a 2*12 cab and left my 4*12 back down at my folks place and even at that its still awkward to carry around! I know there look great, but think of the practical side too no point having a cool looking amp if you cant get it anywhere!

You seem to be pretty young (forgive me if I am wrong) so budjet may be an issue, I usually recommend 2nd hand stuff but unless you know a thing or two about amps you could get burned by someone, so maybe go for some of the cheaper new "good" amps. My suggestions:

Blackstar ht5: great sounding combo practice amp, 5watt hybrid sounds fully tube if you ask me (just sold mine and really really miss it but as mentioned i need to get a 2*12 for gigging someting had to give) Blackstar is run by all former marshall designers and have that real marshall vibe if thats what your really want

Blackstar ht20: bigger badder version of the above, very loud ideal for gigging - BOTH come in stack versions if you have your heart set on a stack

Fender mustang III: Cheap cheerfull practice amp, solid state and loud enough to get you gigging

Bugera V22: full tube, supposed to be great one of my buddies sings its praises, one of the cheapest fully tube amps, designed by soldano (soldano are better than marshall some say)

Look em up on youtube, and GOOOD LUCK
07 Gibson Les Paul LE
06 Fender Mex Strat - SDJb Jr, duckbucker, lil 59
Floor
Cry Baby 95Q-> Digitech Whammy -> DD3 -> MXR Micro Amp-> TU 2
Loop
Holy Grail ->Boss Rc20 Loop Station
Amp
Laney GH50 with Zilla Fatboy 2x12 (celestion g12-65)
#34
Quote by gerrywm
Bugera V22: full tube, supposed to be great one of my buddies sings its praises, one of the cheapest fully tube amps, designed by soldano (soldano are better than marshall some say)

No they aren't your thinking of Jet City amps.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#35
Quote by Robbgnarly
No they aren't your thinking of Jet City amps.


Sorry ya your right my bad! hasty reply
07 Gibson Les Paul LE
06 Fender Mex Strat - SDJb Jr, duckbucker, lil 59
Floor
Cry Baby 95Q-> Digitech Whammy -> DD3 -> MXR Micro Amp-> TU 2
Loop
Holy Grail ->Boss Rc20 Loop Station
Amp
Laney GH50 with Zilla Fatboy 2x12 (celestion g12-65)
#36
Quote by Robbgnarly
This is wrong on so many levels



Quote by al112987
How does that make sense? if you double the speakers, the amplifier is not driving each speaker the same as a single speaker. You are dissipating the same amount of current across two loads.



I have to apologise, I did get it completely wrong. teach me to try and sound smart

With regards to car audio there was stuff we used to do to get more power from the amps with regards to wiring the voice coils differently to change the impedance and bridging the channels. I would be lying if I said I remember the exact ins and outs of how it all worked and I'm not going google it to sound smart. But either way it doesn't apply to guitar cabs and amps.
#37
Quote by jetwash69
@ trashed... & Slap-happy,

The Tweakers are cool. Played on one at a Jam session a few weeks ago. I played the MFX through it mic'd. I'm sure it beat the hell out of the Roland cube it was sharing the stage with . It was kinda hard for me to hear over the drums, but I'm sure a little more tweaking would have fixed that. Or a better stage monitor mix. Anyway, the audience seemed to like it, and it was putting out 105 db all over the club through their PA.


i had the first one out (IIRC15watt) nice amp. however the longer you have it the more everything sounds the same and more bland. they are fun to mess with, but IMO aren't best to be at a gig. would work great in recording, for different sounds.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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