#1
Long story short, I purchased my first (brand new) floyd rose guitar and the setup out of the box was absolutely flawless. Action was nice and low and the strings were very easy to bend. After a month of use, I brought it back into sam ash to have it restrung so I could learn the process of restringing a floyd rose.

The tech restrung everything fine, but said no adjustments on the springs were necessary since we were staying in standard E (he also kept the floyd elevated and only changed 2 strings at a time to keep tension on the springs).

After having it back for a few hours, the springs seem far more difficult to bend and I'm not quite sure why. Do I need to lower the action more? The strings are *very* close to the first few frets on the guitar, but are kinda far away from the higher strings (which are the ones that are harder to bend and keep sustained). The tech said that the important thing is that the screws in the back of the floyd are level with the body of the guitar, *not* the flat piece itself. Is that correct and if not, is that my problem? Take a look at the attached picture.

If I need to lower the action some more, can anyone give me some insight on doing this? Do I need to unlock the 3 nuts at the top of the fretboard and if I lower the action, will the strings hit those first few frets since they're already very close to them? The issue seems to be the higher frets (anything above frets 12-15).

I'm not sure if the strings are just too tight (is that possible?), if the action is set too low, or if the floyd setup is incorrect.

If any additional pictures are needed, just let me know. Thanks!

#2
The base of the bridge (the part you say 'slants down') shoudl be parallel with the body, not the tail of it. Tighten the springs in the body of the guitar attached to the bridge, re-tune, repeat until it's level.

If the strings are that low when it's bowed, you're probably going to want to raise the action a bit as well to prevent buzzing, and re-set the intonation as well.
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#3
He may have used a different string guage, which results in more tension and causes the tremolo to lean "forward" a bit.

Ideally, you'd want the baseplate parallel to the body. You can adjust the screws in the back of the guitar that hold the "claw" in place.

I'd suggest the following:
1) Unlock the nut
2) Tighten the screws in the back just a bit
3) Find a piece of wood or whatever you have lying around to block the tremolo in place.
4) Tune the strings and lock the nut
5) Slowly loosen the screws in the back while constantly checking the tuning
6) As soon as the strings go flat, stop. Remove the block and tune the strings with the fine tuners on the bridge.
#4
Hey! usually the base plate should be parallel. You can just screw the claw in the back a little at a time, and adjust you tuning accordingly. May take a little time. Also,I keep the back cover off all my axes, and when changing strings i put the cover under the back of the bridge and do all the strings at once. You can clean the fret board then too, if needed.
#5
Quote by sashki

3) Find a piece of wood or whatever you have lying around to block the tremolo in place.


9v battery.

If it is a shade too narrow, winding masking/electrical tape around it or as I have done, a couple of bandaids.
#6
Thanks for the responses, everyone.

Quote by sashki
He may have used a different string guage, which results in more tension and causes the tremolo to lean "forward" a bit.

I'd suggest the following:
1) Unlock the nut
2) Tighten the screws in the back just a bit
3) Find a piece of wood or whatever you have lying around to block the tremolo in place.
4) Tune the strings and lock the nut
5) Slowly loosen the screws in the back while constantly checking the tuning
6) As soon as the strings go flat, stop. Remove the block and tune the strings with the fine tuners on the bridge.


Can you explain #2, 3, and 5 a little more? I should tighten the screws in the claw, then lock the trem in place (like the tech did to prevent the tension from changing), then loosen the screws in the claw? I'm a bit confused; if you lock the trem into position, would you be able to "setup" the claw or would you not see a difference until that block of wood or 9v battery is removed? I guess I don't understand the reasoning of locking the trem in place before making the adjustment.

And to confirm, I always need to loosen the nuts before modifying the claw's screws, correct?
#7
It took about an hour of adjusting between the springs and constantly retuning, but it's pretty straight now. I have a few questions though.

1) what is the reasoning behind putting something under the bridge's base? I've seen a lot of people do it. I tried to keep it in place but after tuning for 15 minutes and pulling the "stopper" out from underneath, everything just went outa whack. It was like it didn't matter at all because as soon as it was pulled out, all of the tension transferred from the "stopper" to the springs.

2) when tuning, I found it best to only tune 2 strings at a time (leaving 2 nuts locked)...is that the way you're supposed to do it or do you unlock everything and it's a constant battle between spring tension and tuning?
#8
2) is easy to answer; Unlock them all. It's a constant battle between spring and string tension, but you'll get used to it!

1) is trickier, but a well-known way to set up a Floyd. The idea is pretty simple:
If you're blocking your bridge completely parallel, then the block (or whatever you're using to lock the bridge in place) is eliminating one of the variables, the springs. Tune your strings perfectly, remove the block, and then release the springs in the back until your strings are (more or less) in tune. Your bridge should now be (again; more or less) parallel.

This should give you a steady base for adjustments, cutting out a lot of the time.
#9
Thanks. One last question regarding the action. The strings are still pretty high (quite a bit higher than the action set on my les paul). When I tried lowering the action on the floyd rose, it sure seemed difficult to do...I could barely get it past one turn on the allen key on just the base side of the action. Do I need to do anything special here (i.e. unlock the nuts)?
#10
Quote by Foxdog175
Thanks. One last question regarding the action. The strings are still pretty high (quite a bit higher than the action set on my les paul). When I tried lowering the action on the floyd rose, it sure seemed difficult to do...I could barely get it past one turn on the allen key on just the base side of the action. Do I need to do anything special here (i.e. unlock the nuts)?


Make sure that you're screwing down both screws on the bridge incrementally, as if the bridge gets too slanted it can warp the other screw as you're adjusting the action. Do a half turn on one side, and then on the other. Rinse and repeat. Otherwise, I unno.
#11
+1 For this thread. I'm also working with my first Floyd (OG) and after making some tuning adjustments out of the shop, the bridge was no longer parallel. This thread has answered most, if not all, of my questions regarding what to do.

One other question however... If I drop my axe to C and use a heavier gauge of strings, all I'll have to do is adjust the claw screws (possibly add another spring) and adjust the inotation, correct? (Sorry for hijacking the thread btw). I might just skip dropping my Floyd equipped and file out the nut on one of my other hardtails.
#13
Quote by Minivirus2
+1 For this thread. I'm also working with my first Floyd (OG) and after making some tuning adjustments out of the shop, the bridge was no longer parallel. This thread has answered most, if not all, of my questions regarding what to do.

One other question however... If I drop my axe to C and use a heavier gauge of strings, all I'll have to do is adjust the claw screws (possibly add another spring) and adjust the inotation, correct? (Sorry for hijacking the thread btw). I might just skip dropping my Floyd equipped and file out the nut on one of my other hardtails.


Yes, I believe that's all you have to do when changing gauges, in theory. You should also check your truss rod, and your action however. Depends what gauge you're switching from and how well your guitar is set up right now.
#14
Quote by Tallica9000
Make sure that you're screwing down both screws on the bridge incrementally, as if the bridge gets too slanted it can warp the other screw as you're adjusting the action. Do a half turn on one side, and then on the other. Rinse and repeat. Otherwise, I unno.


I must have turned it the wrong way initially (pulling the bridge upward). I was able to lower the action using your steps w/o any issue. It's far better now. Thanks!