#1
So I've recently bought my friends nylonstringed classical guitar, it was a lefty so I decieded to string it right. I've done low E,A,D,G,B without any problems but when it comes to high E it just shit itself. I can't tune it lower than B without it breaking at the bridge. Currently I got it tuned to B, but if tune it higher it will probably break, and now I mean break in 2, not just unravel itself at the bridge.

Any ideas what might be the problem ?

Thanks
#2
Hmm... the only thing I can think of is that the entire guitar is tuned too high... May seem like a dumb question, but are you using a tuner?

is the Low E tuned an octave too high? A nylon stringed guitar is about as simple as it gets mechanically, so I doubt its the bridge cutting the string or anything like that... If the guitar was built as a lefty you may encounter some intonation problems, but nothing that should be breaking strings..
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
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OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#3
Yea I'm using a tuner, JOYO 128 Digital Tuner, and the low E is fine
#4
Sorry.. I told you it may be a dumb question...

Anything sharp on the bridge that could cut the string... Probably thought of that too...

Fact is that unless the strings your putting on are "Different" than "Normal", there's nothing I can think of that would cause it to break except excess tension... which would mean tuning it too high...

Sorry couldnt' be more help..
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#5
ah well thanks for your help Guess I have to drop by the local musikstore and check 'the **** is goin' on
#6
Send me a message when you find out... Interested to see what it was causing the problem...
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#7
Put some lube in the nut slot for the (now) high e string. It's entirely possible that the string is hanging up in the slot causing you all sorts of issues. The nut slots were cut for right hand playing, and since you've now reversed the order of the strings, the slots are backwards. Nylons usually carry a fairly even gauge across all 6 strings, but there are differences and the nut is cut accordingly. You can use just a small dab of vasoline on it then try to tune up again. Others will suggest pencil dust, but it doesn't stay put very well. I use this stuff called Big Bends Nut Sauce, available from Musiciansfriend.com. It's basically white petroleum jelly with fine ground graphite mixed in. Works great. You can also lube the contact point on the saddle as well. Right at the crown where the string sits, and again, just a very small dab will do. Apply the lube after the strings are tied in place at the bridge and wound onto the tuners, but before much tension is on them.
#8
Quote by 94jha02
Yea I'm using a tuner, JOYO 128 Digital Tuner, and the low E is fine
The funny thing about guitar tuners, (& tuners in general), you can tune to any old "E" and they'll tell you you're tuned to an "E".

Quote by Papabear505
If the guitar was built as a lefty you may encounter some intonation problems, but nothing that should be breaking strings..
Most classical guitars don't have a compensated saddle. They're probably the ones that would give you the least problems switching hands. I don't know if the soundboard bracing has any bias though.

Quote by LeftyDave
...[ ]...I use this stuff called Big Bends Nut Sauce, available from Musiciansfriend.co...[ ]...
If that's the case, you need to get thee to a Walmart. You should be able to whip up a lifetime supply for about five bucks. Perhaps even sell some untaxed, like moonshine....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 29, 2012,