#1
Hi all
This is my first post and I am relatively new to playing guitar so please go easy!!!
My question is - when trying to solo over a chord progression (for example in the key of E) and using the pentatonic scale, do I use the "E Major" pentatonic scale when the rhythm part is playing the "E" chord (ie resolving back on the root note E) and then move onto using the "A minor" pentatonic scale (ie resolving back on the root note A) when the rhythm part is playing the "Am" chord, and so on? And if so is this what modes are or am I on a completely different wave length altogether?
Thanks in advance for any responses.
#2
You can do that, but it might be a little awkward over quick changes. If the track is in E major, you can play E major pentatonic over the whole thing
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#3
Thanks for the quick reply Paddy. How do I know if I should be playing a major or minor pentatonic?
#4
It's very simple, you solo in the key of the song. If the song is in E major, you solo in E major, even if it's over an A or B chord for example, since they both are used in the E major scale.
#5
OK thats cool thanks for the speedy replies. That makes it so much easier so. Maybe its not such an uphill battle after all.
Another question though if you dont mind- what dictates which scale position you use or is that just a matter of choice and convenience depending on where abouts on the neck you are playing?
#6
Quote by neilspost2
OK thats cool thanks for the speedy replies. That makes it so much easier so. Maybe its not such an uphill battle after all.
Another question though if you dont mind- what dictates which scale position you use or is that just a matter of choice and convenience depending on where abouts on the neck you are playing?

you answered your own question
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#8
Also, try to really hear what sounds good. Sometimes, playing a note that is actually NOT in the key you are playing in can really spice things up.
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#9
Oh, another also, what really helps/helped me is singing what you want to play. It forces you to really use your ear to determine what sounds great and what sounds like a dying cat gasping for breath.
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#10
Quote by neilspost2
Hi all
This is my first post and I am relatively new to playing guitar so please go easy!!!
My question is - when trying to solo over a chord progression (for example in the key of E) and using the pentatonic scale, do I use the "E Major" pentatonic scale when the rhythm part is playing the "E" chord (ie resolving back on the root note E) and then move onto using the "A minor" pentatonic scale (ie resolving back on the root note A) when the rhythm part is playing the "Am" chord, and so on? And if so is this what modes are or am I on a completely different wave length altogether?
Thanks in advance for any responses.


Check this site out. www.all-guitar-chords.com

Heres an exercise for hearing the mode sounds.

Drone out an E note (have E consistently ringing). You can do this through a looper or put a keyboard at your feet and step on the E note. (anyway you can find lol)

Then go to that website and choose each of the following.

E Ionian (major)
E Dorian
E Phrygian
E Lydian
E Mixolydian
E Aeolian (minor)
E Locrian

And experiment with each of those scales. You should be able to clearly distinguish what each mode will sound like because of the notes that make up each scale and the E note that is droning in the background.
#11
Quote by Ryan Tunis
Check this site out. www.all-guitar-chords.com

Heres an exercise for hearing the mode sounds.

Drone out an E note (have E consistently ringing). You can do this through a looper or put a keyboard at your feet and step on the E note. (anyway you can find lol)

Then go to that website and choose each of the following.

E Ionian (major)
E Dorian
E Phrygian
E Lydian
E Mixolydian
E Aeolian (minor)
E Locrian

And experiment with each of those scales. You should be able to clearly distinguish what each mode will sound like because of the notes that make up each scale and the E note that is droning in the background.

Completely ignore all of this. There's absolutely no reason to start looking at modes yet. They can be useful and interesting, but only once you have an extremely thorough understanding of scales and theory in general.
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#13
Pentatonic can sound cool, but I hardly use it, because I don't like the sound. I prefer to use "modes", like Ryan.

However, instead of trying to go through all the "modes", you will want to stick with the Major Scale and the Minor Scale. These are basically the two pentatonic scales you mentioned (major and minor pentatonic), just expanded. You might like them.

You would use them in the same way as you would the pentatonic scales:

Figure out the key the song is in, then play over with the appropriate scale. If the song is in E major, you can play over the WHOLE song using the E major scale.

When you are ready to learn more, you will, young padawan.
Last edited by maltmn at Jan 31, 2012,
#15
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#17
Ok... there are so many ways to solo it's impossible to explain. The only way to improve your improvising skill is just to do it. You'll learn through trial and error.. sort of.

Here's your short answer:

Play random notes. It helps if they are in a scale. It also helps if the scale is in the same key as the chords that are playing behind you.

There are some things you can do to speed up the learning process. Here's some ideas:

1. solo using only a single string over a chord progression
2. solo using any one technique (slides, bends, string skipping)
3. solo using any scale you know
4. solo using any 2 pairs of non-adjacent strings
5. solo with your voice (and then figure out how to play what you just sung on your guitar)

Then, once you've done all those, you'll want to pick 2 or 3 of the ideas and sort of combine them together... so you're not just doing one thing all the time, but you're sort of weaving in between techniques.

Those ideas can get you started. Again, the ONLY way that you'll get better is just by doing it, unless you actually have a teacher that can show you how to target consonant pitches, and explain a little theory and then have you practice in front of him...

Also:

WORK ON EAR TRAINING!!!!!!!!!! That will MASSIVELY improve your improvising, soloing, composing, and any other kind of guitar skill, really. Even technique. No joke.
Last edited by maltmn at Feb 1, 2012,