#1
I was just wondering if there is any notation to play the notes lower than the low E if the guitar is drop tuned,say drop c or something,similar to how the high notes are notated.

Or will the bass notation be used?
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#2
Based on the few tab books I own, it's common practice to notate a song as if you weren't drop tuned. Any song in a standard tuning would be written as if it were in E standard, and any song in a drop tuning would be written as if it were in drop D.
#3
I would actually use transposition so that the notes correspond to the fretboard in standard tuning, ie written low E is actually the C below. Makes it easier for the player to read.

If you must use absolutes, then you should use a treble clef with an "8" below the clef to signify that everyyhing is an octave lower than written. That way you can write from middle C and avoid excess ledger lines.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#4
In power tabs if you change the tuning of the guitar to drop C it notates the low C with four ledger lines with the note underneath the bottom line
#5
Generally it is notated, as everyone has said, in a manner which corresponds to the standard tuning of the guitar but some purists will demand that it be notationally true.

The guitar is a transposing instrument anyway, everything you read sounds an octave lower than it's played.
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#6
Quote by Xiaoxi
I would actually use transposition so that the notes correspond to the fretboard in standard tuning, ie written low E is actually the C below. Makes it easier for the player to read.


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#DTWD
#7
I've played a ton of classical guitar sheet music with dropped D strings where the notes are just noted as they sound.

I find it alot easier to read than what Xiaoxi suggested

You would get some pretty awkward situations where you aren't sure if a note like a Bb is supposed to be played on the E (sounding G#) or the A string (sounding natural).

I also just looks alot cleaner when you use scale runs and octaves and stuff, and it's really easy to read once you get used to it.
#8
Quote by 505088K
I've played a ton of classical guitar sheet music with dropped D strings where the notes are just noted as they sound.

I find it alot easier to read than what Xiaoxi suggested

You would get some pretty awkward situations where you aren't sure if a note like a Bb is supposed to be played on the E (sounding G#) or the A string (sounding natural).

I also just looks alot cleaner when you use scale runs and octaves and stuff, and it's really easy to read once you get used to it.


I think he was under the assumption TS meant CFBbEbGC not CGCFAD. if it's CGCFAD it'd be better to transpose so that a written low E would sounded as a D. I'd do it by just indicating the tuning at the top but indicating to play the music as if it was drop D/standard.

it's far easier that way. on bass pieces in solo tuning they just say "tuned F#BEA" and write a whole step lower. so bottesini's elegie in d is written in C with standard tuning fingerings. to do anything else would be bizarre and counterintuitive. string players know their fingerings down pat. it'd be better to write for the fingerings they know and simply change the strings so the notes they hit transpose to be what you want.

it's the sheet music equivalent of a capo and saying play the chords as written.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Jan 30, 2012,