#1
Hey guys,

I'm a relatively new guitarist been playing about 7 months. I have barre chords, power chords palm muting and hammer-on and pull-off techniques down pretty well.

I'm struggling right now with writing my own fresh material, I have a few chord progressions I've worked out using power chords that I like the sound of but I was just wondering if you guys could help point me in the right direction regarding building intros, solos and interludes. Any good reads out there for me? The internet is flooded with information on theses kinds of things and it's overwhelming trying to find the right videos, the good ones, the bad ones etc.

For any aspiring pop / punk artists out there if you could help share some of the things that really got your ball rolling that would be awesome .

One more thing... As this is my first post I hope it's ok as far as formatting and relevance is concerned. I don't want to piss off the community!

Thanks for reading.
#2
I'm reporting this because it'd be better for S&L Techniques, and this is more for poetry and lyrics themselves.


Honestly though, just continue playing and practicing your favorite songs. You'll slowly learn the ins and outs of constructing riffs, relevant chord progressions, and how to transition between what you want. The more practice, the broader your scope of bands, and how hard you try will all factor in to teaching you how to better construct a pop song.

Fall back:

Intro
Verse
Chorus
Verse
Chorus
Interlude
Chorus
Chorus

All over I-V-vi-IV (D, A, Bm, G if in D major)
#3
Moved to Musician Talk.

Don't worry, you're not pissing anyone off. Just give the rules of each forum a quick read over and you shall fit in well.
#5
Thanks for that. I've seen that video and it did help somewhat. I can play dammit and what's my age again but formulating my own riffs with that ascending root note is still a little confusing to me. Maybe you could eloborate on your take of what he says? That'd be cool.

"AngryGoldfish" Thanks for moving this to a more appropriate place. I'll def browse the rules first next time and I appreciate the tip!
#7
for any genre of music you want to assimilate into:

listen - actively listen to the music, if it makes you feel a certain way, take note
learn - analyze the song. if there's a rhythm that gives a particular sound, or there's a point of interest, figure out what it is, how they got that effect, how you can use it yourself.
apply - when you're writing your music, apply things you learned from several songs and artists if you want a certain sound, effect, etc.

with pop punk: remember it's not just power chords and cheesy lyrics, because it's pretty hard to attract older people with that kind of music and blink and green day already harvested the bejesus out of the genre. of course, do it how you like it, but it wouldn't hurt to do something different and interesting. you can use keyboards, you can use different types of chords (i had a guitarist that put a lot of m7no3 and similar power chord kind of things into his playing, made some very interesting little progressions).
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#8
DEVELOP YOUR EAR

There is really nothing you can do that will help your musical creativity so much as developing your ear. (My recommendation is to download the free Functional Ear Trainer at Miles.Be, and get a good book on Ear Training - I used "Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician" by Keith Wyatt and others).

The problem is that for an inexperienced musician, creating a riff (or a melody, or a chord structure) is a physical activity - "what happens if I put my fingers here? Does that sound cool?" - when what you want it to be is a mental activity - "I have this sound in my head that I think would be AWESOME!". Ear training is the key to making that leap.

Once you've started to develop your ear you will probably naturally start hearing inspiration for riffs and intros and melodies all around you, all the time - and not just in other music. If you don't ... you'll probably never really come up with anything very original.
#9
HotspurJr: That's some really great advice. It actually just put into perspective what I've been doing all along. I have been trying to make it a physical activity as opposed to a mental one. I will look into those books as well. Thank you very much for this sound constructive advice.

Hail: Thank you for this advice as well. I am an active music listener. All I do is listen to Pop/punk 24/7. At work, in the car, at home etc... I will def try more analyzing the song and everything. I try to look up tabs cuz everyone's like "Tabs brah" when I asked if they had any advice for learning. But sometimes it's hard to take tabs and make them actually sound like the song for me. Does that sound like something familiar?

If anyone has missed anything or if anyone reading this has any other tips please post them. I'm already learning a lot from this thread.


Thanks guys and rock on
#10
Tabs are great for starting with, cause you learn to play favourite songs pretty quickly... however, they don't give the real context/rhythm/theory/ etc.... not saying that you have to learn to read music (although it's good if you do) but understand familiar patterns when your reading tabs will help you out a lot.
#11
Quote by Dalymiddleboro

Hail: Thank you for this advice as well. I am an active music listener. All I do is listen to Pop/punk 24/7. At work, in the car, at home etc... I will def try more analyzing the song and everything. I try to look up tabs cuz everyone's like "Tabs brah" when I asked if they had any advice for learning. But sometimes it's hard to take tabs and make them actually sound like the song for me. Does that sound like something familiar?


i didn't mean actively like 'listen all the time', i mean to listen actively to what's going on in the music. get involved in it, not just background humming. figure out what intervals do what - it goes along with basic theory and having a relatively developed ear.

and as hotspur said, don't use tabs, use your ear, especially with such simple music (no offense, but it is almost completely power chords). this will help you visualize the song. if you're having trouble translating tabs to proper playing, you might be a little in over your head in terms of writing music, though. you'll want that to take a back-seat until your ear, playing, and knowledge ups a little bit so you can do what you want more easily and more successfully.
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
Last edited by Hail at Feb 1, 2012,
#12
Well with tabs, I can read them and I understand how to follow them, I just often hear sometimes what I'm playing from the tabs doesn't sound like the song. This isn't always the case just sometimes. Also, no worries I wasn't offended in my opinion good music should sound good to the listener, complicated doesn't always mean better and I love how pop/punk is simple but catchy.


EDIT: Also, as far as writing songs go, I think it would be a hinderance on myself to not pursue this. I feel like attempting to write music can be an educational experience and not solely for more advanced players. Tom Delonge was self taught and he wrote his own material within a couple of years and he progressed both in guitar and music composition as his career moved along. I think putting that on the back burner when I have a large desire for that could be crippling to my guitar education. Any feedback on this?
Last edited by Dalymiddleboro at Feb 1, 2012,