#1
Hey guys!
I have a scale, let's say the Pentatonic scale.
Now, I'm improvising really well on it, but I always wondered - when can I bend a note, and how much? I mean, the rules and logic behind it. Also, I've heard that whenever your index finger is on the key note - you have to bend if you want to go down to the next string. How do I gather all of that information by just looking at the scale?
#2
Take the note you're playing, say a G at 15th fret on the high E in the G major pentatonic scale. Looking at the scale, the next note up is an A at the 17th fret, so you can bend the G up one whole tone to that note. This works in all scales, and there are other types of bend, like quarter tone bends and pre-bends that have their own uses. As for: 'Also, I've heard that whenever your index finger is on the key note - you have to bend if you want to go down to the next string'. No idea, never heard or used anything of the sort
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#3
best thing is to learn al the positions of the pentatonic scale. than you will understand if you are ´able´ to bend a note.
#4
Quote by eyalcisv
Hey guys!
I have a scale, let's say the Pentatonic scale.
Now, I'm improvising really well on it, but I always wondered - when can I bend a note, and how much? I mean, the rules and logic behind it. Also, I've heard that whenever your index finger is on the key note - you have to bend if you want to go down to the next string. How do I gather all of that information by just looking at the scale?

Forget scales for the time being - there's no mystery about bending, you're probably overcomplicating the issue. What you're missing is that you're thinking of bending as a way of "affecting" the note you're playing, when in reality you should already have two notes in mind before you start worrying about how to move between them.

Bending is simply a way of moving between two notes, that's all...same as picking two seperate notes, hammering on or sliding. How you move between those notes is entirely up to you, after all you're the one playing the guitar, so it's up to you to decide how things are going to sound.
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#5
Quote by eyalcisv
Hey guys!
I have a scale, let's say the Pentatonic scale.
Now, I'm improvising really well on it, but I always wondered - when can I bend a note, and how much? I mean, the rules and logic behind it. Also, I've heard that whenever your index finger is on the key note - you have to bend if you want to go down to the next string. How do I gather all of that information by just looking at the scale?


The short answer is that you can bend any note to any other note in the scale if you can pull off the bend.

In the pentatonic, you often bend from a note in the diatonic scale that's not in the pentatonic scale to the note in the scale. eg, in Am Pent, you might bend from F to G - F isn't in the pentatonic scale but it IS in the A minor scale. Also common is bending from a note into the major pent scale to the minor pent scale, or vice versa - eg, you might bend from C to C# in Am pentatonic.

The real answer, though, is that you develop your ear and then you bend notes because you like the sound they make. There isn't a "logic" to it except so much as you'll find that some things sound good together, and other things don't. As you develop your ear, you'll be able to get more and more creative with bends - you'll hear subtle bends in songs you listen to, and start applying that to your own work.