#1
Lately I've been practicing sweep picking a lot as part of my daily routine and the problem I'm mostly having, is rolling across three strings. Part of the problem, is that my hands are really small and when I go to roll my finger (usually my index), it gets caught/stuck. So is there any advice (possibly from other guitar players here with small hands) on rolling during sweeps, so that I can avoid any extra string noise?
I'm a musician/composer before I'm a guitar player.

foREVer


R.I.P Jimmy "The Reverend Tholomew Plague" Sullivan.
#2
Heres one I like to play


e___________13 18
B_________15
G_______15
D___ 15
A 17
E

To start off, make sure your fretting hand is in the right position.Make sure your thumb is pressed against the back of the nck pointed straight up behind your second finger, your palm may strain, so if it does you know you havent built enough strength in your hand.also make sure your thumb is firmly in palce, it should not move at all (the thumb on your fretting hand) while you play the arpeggio sequence, it should not move at all even when you get to the high strings, it may curl back a bit thats okay. keep your thumb in bout the middle of the fretboard, or a little lower if your more comfortable, just make sure it doesnt move when your playing, your thumb being in this position will allow your fingers to curl in so your fingertips can make contact with the fretboard, if your not coming in at the tips your not doing it right.

To play this srquence your pinky should come in on its fingertip to the fret to play the first 17 on the A string (if your thumb is in the right position, you also shouldn't see it over the top of the fretboard)next I play the 15th fret of the D strong also with my finger tip of my second finger, now whats critical here is your second finger is alligned with the fret for the roll, so make sure your thumb is in the right position on the back of the fretboard. To play the 15 on the G string, just let your second finger flatten, it should be on its fingertip from the last 15 on the A string, so when youlet your finger flatten, you will strike the 15 on the G string with the meshy part of your finger where your fingerprint would be, and the tip comes off the 15 on the A string. When you release the 15 on the A strong, for me its still touching the tip of my finger, but its making no noise since its no longer vibrating against the freboard, as you play the arpeggio sequence you need to release your finger from the previos fret at the same time you play the enxt time, they shouldnt overlap, but it needs to be swift, if you relase from the prvious fret at the right time and strike the next fret at the right time, then there should be no strong nose, basically what im trying to say here is you stop the previous strings from ringing with your fretting hand and not your picking hand, thats how you cancel out the string noise, also if you play with your thumb on your picking hand close enough to the strings, then you may develop a hanbit of cancelling out the previous string with your thumb through the downward motion by the thumb ouching the string you just played on the way down, but on the way up you cannot rely on this and need to make sure your fretting fretting properly to cancel the strings. to hit the 15 on the B string, the middle part of my finger comes up a bit so the string is no longer vibrating against the fretboard, but it is resting against my finger (as long as its touching my finger it wont ring at all) and I hit the 15 on the B strong with the bottom part of my finger just about were the finger bends near the top, and thats about it, so make sure you use proper technique all around
Last edited by 123mac123 at Jan 30, 2012,
#3
Quote by 123mac123
Heres one I like to play


e___________13 18
B_________15
G_______15
D___ 15
A 17
E

To start off, make sure your fretting hand is in the right position.Make sure your thumb is pressed against the back of the nck pointed straight up behind your second finger, your palm may strain, so if it does you know you havent built enough strength in your hand.also make sure your thumb is firmly in palce, it should not move at all (the thumb on your fretting hand) while you play the arpeggio sequence, it should not move at all even when you get to the high strings, it may curl back a bit thats okay. keep your thumb in bout the middle of the fretboard, or a little lower if your more comfortable, just make sure it doesnt move when your playing, your thumb being in this position will allow your fingers to curl in so your fingertips can make contact with the fretboard, if your not coming in at the tips your not doing it right.

To play this srquence your pinky should come in on its fingertip to the fret to play the first 17 on the A string (if your thumb is in the right position, you also shouldn't see it over the top of the fretboard)next I play the 15th fret of the D strong also with my finger tip of my second finger, now whats critical here is your second finger is alligned with the fret for the roll, so make sure your thumb is in the right position on the back of the fretboard. To play the 15 on the G string, just let your second finger flatten, it should be on its fingertip from the last 15 on the A string, so when youlet your finger flatten, you will strike the 15 on the G string with the meshy part of your finger where your fingerprint would be, and the tip comes off the 15 on the A string. When you release the 15 on the A strong, for me its still touching the tip of my finger, but its making no noise since its no longer vibrating against the freboard, as you play the arpeggio sequence you need to release your finger from the previos fret at the same time you play the enxt time, they shouldnt overlap, but it needs to be swift, if you relase from the prvious fret at the right time and strike the next fret at the right time, then there should be no strong nose, basically what im trying to say here is you stop the previous strings from ringing with your fretting hand and not your picking hand, thats how you cancel out the string noise, also if you play with your thumb on your picking hand close enough to the strings, then you may develop a hanbit of cancelling out the previous string with your thumb through the downward motion by the thumb ouching the string you just played on the way down, but on the way up you cannot rely on this and need to make sure your fretting fretting properly to cancel the strings. to hit the 15 on the B string, the middle part of my finger comes up a bit so the string is no longer vibrating against the fretboard, but it is resting against my finger (as long as its touching my finger it wont ring at all) and I hit the 15 on the B strong with the bottom part of my finger just about were the finger bends near the top, and thats about it, so make sure you use proper technique all around

Is it just me, or does this entire post seem to be just reiterating the same 2 things over and over (thumb placement and playing with your fingertips)? It seems a little drawn out and pointless to me.

TS, the simple solution to your problem is: First practice. Second, muting.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#4
Small hands have nothing to do with your guitar playing technique. It's only something that you want to believe because you are struggling with a specific motion, and you don't know what's actually causing the problem.

When my students tell me they have small hands and can't do something, it's ALWAYS because they're holding the guitar in the wrong way.

Unfortunately, there is no solution I can give to you for this problem you are having. The only way to get it is to find someone who can see your hand position, and knows what you need to do to fix the issue (aka a great guitar teacher - don't settle for a bad, cheap teacher, they're like bad beer).
#5
Pretty much, unless you're less than 12 years old, the problem is hand position. One thing that I can point out that's helpful is that even when rolling, you don't want your fingers to bend "back" at the joints, just go flat. It's pretty tricky, but it does help a lot.
#6
Quote by Count Orlok
Lately I've been practicing sweep picking a lot as part of my daily routine and the problem I'm mostly having, is rolling across three strings. Part of the problem, is that my hands are really small and when I go to roll my finger (usually my index), it gets caught/stuck. So is there any advice (possibly from other guitar players here with small hands) on rolling during sweeps, so that I can avoid any extra string noise?

The finger itself doesn't move. So try not to flatten out the pre-knuckle or anything like that.

A backwards and forwards motion should come from the elbow and wrist.
#7
Thanks for the advice. And honestly, it really was the position with my hand along with the fact that I was keeping my finger straight when rolling (which has really helped). Overall, much appreciated.
I'm a musician/composer before I'm a guitar player.

foREVer


R.I.P Jimmy "The Reverend Tholomew Plague" Sullivan.
#8
Hey Count -

If you click the link in my signature, it will take you to my youtube channel where you will find a playlist called "learn how to sweep pick". I recommend you watch p1 first, but if you are more interested in some exercises specifically for rolling then watch parts 2 and 3. Hope they help! Practice with a clean tone, keep your motion minimal. Practice very slow at first until you can roll them clean. Watch the lessons! Good luck