#1
For Experimenting: I just tried 1000 grit sandpaper on my old cheap no brand guitar neck for the first time, and as you can see, left part is already sanded a little; right part is not sanded yet. It does feel more smooth and comfortable, and I would sand down the whole neck for this old cheap guitar.


BUT, after trying sanding on my old cheap guitar, for some reason now I don't really want to do it with my "Fender 57 Reissue Stratocaster Made In Japan Since 1993's Poly Maple Neck" anymore, partly because I don't want to lose to the original. Of course playability is more important, but personally, I just don't find sanding making "A HUGE" difference in terms of smoothness. A lot of you would probably disagree with me on this, but it's just my personal preference after trying it out myself...


SO, I thought might as well stick with the gentle way for solving sticky maple neck issues which is using these I got beside me: (I understand for smoothness these can't be as effective as sandpaper but at least they should help? I mean, with my maple neck, a little more smooth than how it is now, then I'm satisfied.)




QUESTION:
1) If I rub my maple neck with a rag with this lemon oil and let it dry, then do it again, is it going to be: the more times I repeat this step the more smooth it will get? or with lemon oil + rag no matter how much I do it, it's just going to be the same amount of stickiness that I lose?
2) If I use this powder often, is the neck going to be less and less sticky over time, or no matter how long, when the powder is gone, the same amount of stickiness is back?
3) Anyone have any review on this lemon oil / powder brand? are they safe for poly maple neck?

any reply will be highly appreciated thank you
Last edited by Jimmy25 at Jan 31, 2012,
#3
Rubbing lemon oil and powder on your neck to make it less sticky is a very temporary solution. Just rubbing lemon oil on the neck will just result in you wiping it off with your hands as you play. Likewise with powder. There's not much you can do about it other than satin-ise the finish with sandpaper.

The sandpaper idea may well devalue your guitar, but it won't damage the finish whatsoever. You are removing an almost immeasurable amount of material from the neck by sanding it. Just playing the guitar for a really long time would do the same thing eventually. Satin-ising the finish is only semi-permanent too. With playing, the satin will wear down to a gloss. And if you are going to sell it on before then, i don't see the harm in giving the back of the neck a little hit of lacquer to make it gloss again and nobody would ever know.

I'm no expert on this,though. But it would make sense to me for that to be possible.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 31, 2012,
#4
At best, the lemon oil will do nothing. At best. There's a very healthy chance it'll leave a nasty stain.

That powder also isn't going to do anything, other than absorb the natural oils in your skin and dry your hands out, which if anything will increase drag overall and if your fretboard is rosewood or ebony, won't be healthy for it. Even with moisturising baby powder, you wouldn't be achieving anything; it'll do nothing positive and damage rosewood (plus possibly stain maple)

As T00DEEPBLUE said, just sandpaper it. If you don't think sandpapering makes a ''huge'' difference, then either A) you're not sanding the neck back properly or B) you're expecting more from a satin neck than is realistic.

Fact is, people have been sanding back the finishes on maple necks for decades because that's what's best. It's cheap, effective and in all honesty it doesn't harm the value of the guitar much at all since it's as common as changing pickups. Just do what everyone else has been doing since the electric guitar was invented and sand the top of the finish off. Personally, I do it by using wet & dry paper, dry first and wet (well, damp) to finish off. It takes a while but there's no risk of going too far.
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#5
If you started with 1000 grit sandpaper you're never going to get a good raw feel. That's not sanding, it's polishing (or just rubbing grime in, if you didn't clean it properly). You need something much, much more coarse to actually get results. Start with 100 or 150, then move to 220, then to 1000 gradually.

It's up to you whether you actually want to do that to a 57RI or not, but the reason you're not getting good results is because you're not doing it right. Sanding a neck will absolutely get rid of stickiness, especially on those poly Fender necks.
#9
back when I played pool a lot I would use baby powder on the cue to make it smooth, I dont see when this wouldnt work on a guitar. but you are going to have to do it a lot, its not a one time thing like sanding
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#10
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#11
Lemon oil isn't meant for necks, it's for fretboards. Given that your neck has a poly finish, it'll most likely just drip off. It won't be absorbed or anything.
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#13
Excuse me, does anyone has a picture of a maple fretboard that's sanded / steel wool Before and After picture? I've seen rosewood neck getting sanded on youtube and the change of the look is pretty obvious. I'm just wondering how it looks after a maple fretboard get sanded / steel wool. How does the look change? any of you did it or can find a picture / video of before and after? o.0
Last edited by Jimmy25 at Feb 1, 2012,
#16
Use one of those green Brillo pads instead of steel wool so you don't get a bunch of filings stuck on the poles of your pickups. You can usually polish a sanded poly neck back to a good glossy shine with really fine wet sandpaper, too.
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#18
Quote by Jimmy25
Excuse me, does anyone has a picture of a maple fretboard that's sanded / steel wool Before and After picture? I've seen rosewood neck getting sanded on youtube and the change of the look is pretty obvious. I'm just wondering how it looks after a maple fretboard get sanded / steel wool. How does the look change? any of you did it or can find a picture / video of before and after? o.0
No one sands a rosewood fingerboard unless it is to remove gunk with very fine steel wool because a rosewood fingerboard does not have finish on it.

Sand the neck or live with the gloss surface. It's really simple. I have no idea what you are expecting the lemon oil to do. It's not a lubricant and it does not take care of your problem. The finish of the neck should be fairly thick, if you just sand lightly then you will still have more than enough finish to rebuff it into a gloss if you ever wanted to reverse sanding it.
#20
Just play it or take it back.

You clearly dont like this guitar so just get rid if it before you ruin it.

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#21
Quote by gregs1020
regardless, 800 has the best toan.

Only if you use good quality chromium oxide that is red in colour. If you go for the cheap stuff, or yellow in colour, you'll find it thins out your tone too much for a strat and will have to go to 1000 grit.


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#22
NO baby powder on the neck! Just a little drib on yer thumb/index finger/web joint ta slick things up a bit. IT *does* dry yer mitt some AND it's a very silky mineral.
A little dab'll do ya
#23
Luckily my guitar has virtually no resale value (It's from a kit and its condition is pretty bad already) so I can get away with sandpapering the neck of the thing. It plays amazingly!
#24
Quote by Helicopters!
Luckily my guitar has virtually no resale value (It's from a kit and its condition is pretty bad already) so I can get away with sandpapering the neck of the thing. It plays amazingly!


Why don't you just take the neck off and strip off the finish completly down to bare wood? then you can put lemon oil or whatever you wish on it.
#26
It also won't really work because maple isn't porous enough to absorb lemon oil. Some will soak in but it'll serve no purpose. The only oils that would protect a recently sanded maple neck from warping would be a proper oil finish, such as tung oil. But then if you're going to do that, you might as well just part-sand the current poly finish.
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