#1
My band mates and myself are in the process of recording our album. I play guitar and the other guitarist seems to know a lot about home recording techniques. However, I do think he likes to talk out of his ass a lot so I'd like to ask the UG community what they think.

I don't know the specs of what he's using so maybe this is useless asking but here goes. He quad tracked rhythm guitars all with one amplifier and the same guitar for all tracks. Perhaps this could work, but when recording don't you just want to stick with using both guitarists amps and guitars to achieve different tonality?? I asked him why we aren't using both amps and he said it's "mixing frequencies" which I have no idea if it's true or not...personally I hear people using two different amps all the time so maybe he is just full crap.

What do you guys think???
#2
Quad tracking makes no sense if the guitars are playing the same thing then if they are using the same tone that sounds like a cluttered mix or he is EQing out the ass with post processing (which I like to avoid when mixing an amped mic).
#3
you haven't given much information here and so it is hard to answer your question. here is some food for thought. it is a common practice in metal to use one tone for left and another for right. (i'm guessing this is a metal production because you are quad tracking.) This can be achieved in a number of ways. you can use the same equipment (amp, cab, mic's etc) and use different mic placements, physical eq on the amp itself, different guitars, and different pre and post eq in your DAW. Depending on your tones you may have to notch out certain frequencies to increase clarity and reduc harshness, but it all depends on the signal recorded and what needs to be adjusted to improve it. I'm going to guess that your friend is still relatively new to this process and just wants to keep things simple by using the same tone across the board. i would suggest if you do this to use different post eq in your DAW for left and right sides, so that they don't sound exactly the same (left and right won't be well defined decreasing stereo impact and increasing mush). Also protip- unless you are INCREDIBLY tight guitarists (99% of us are not) i would suggest you at least try just double tracking. a lot of time it will improve your recordings by a hefty amount. just my two cents. if you have any other questions let me know. I have been doing this stuff for a few years now
"every prince has to slay a few dragons before he meets his princess"
#4
Sorry should have specified we are a black/death/symphonic type of band. I'm a complete noob when it comes to all of this stuff, but I do know that two guitarists usually use their own equipment to achieve different tone. I don't know the reason for quad tracking versus double tracking, I don't know what DAW is, I don't really know anything. I'll hopefully be making a trip over there today to see exactly what he's doing.

Hopefully you guys are still with me, I'd really like to start getting into this stuff, I find it interesting but I don't have a single clue on where to even start with recording. And yes he's also pretty new at it, but he's done a decent job in previous recordings.
#5
Quote by volesky88
My band mates and myself are in the process of recording our album. I play guitar and the other guitarist seems to know a lot about home recording techniques. However, I do think he likes to talk out of his ass a lot so I'd like to ask the UG community what they think.

I don't know the specs of what he's using so maybe this is useless asking but here goes. He quad tracked rhythm guitars all with one amplifier and the same guitar for all tracks. Perhaps this could work, but when recording don't you just want to stick with using both guitarists amps and guitars to achieve different tonality?? I asked him why we aren't using both amps and he said it's "mixing frequencies" which I have no idea if it's true or not...personally I hear people using two different amps all the time so maybe he is just full crap.

What do you guys think???


Unless he plans to mix the quad tracks differently, it doesn't make much sense to record that way. It'll just be collectively louder and the tone will remain the same as having just a single track.

I'm no expert, but personally, I prefer to track the right channel rhythms twice and along with the left channel rhythm guitars twice. Beefs up the tone and hides minor mistakes you might make.
#6
Quad tracks are only ever a good idea if you have timing like a machine, stick to dual tracks unless your playing two different parts, like a rhythm and a lead. Having the same tone on the guitars tend to cancel out any benefit you get from stereo panning the guitars.
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#7
i think you might want to start by asking the guy why he did it that way, maybe he has a reason for wanting everything with the same tone.

not how i would do it, but maybe it works for what he is doing. some people would double track something with similar tones and pan to each side, while others would use different tones. for quad tracking though (and im assuming its either the same part or very similar), you would probably not want that since it will get muddy, as others have said. if i was quad tracking similar parts, i would have two tones on each side that complement one another. so one might be be a bit dark and full in the mids, while the other is brighter and has a more "scooped" sound to it.

if they are separate parts, i would very much recomend using differing tones so that you can hear the distinction between them. again, there are times where you might not want a lot of distinction, but generally you will want to hear them separately.

but ask the guy, maybe he does know what he is doing and has a reason for it.
#8
DAW is acronym for "digital audio workstation" ie protools, cubase, reaper etc. once again i would suggest seeing how double tracking goes. I know most metal guys get it in their heads that quad tracking is the way to go because metallica used to do it and so on. the problem is with downtuned riffs with lots of movement 4 tracks will mud out a lot of the time.
"every prince has to slay a few dragons before he meets his princess"
#9
Haven't read all responses, but as far as I'm concerned it's down to personal preference to a certain degree except for obvious circumstances.

Generally it depends on genre etc. but for modern metal I'd probably keep the guitars on each side fairly similar tonally (i.e same amp) but it varies from project to project and the music itself. An obvious reason to stick to one amp, however, would be if one amp is noticeably better at achieving the desired tones than the other (or if one is a high-end all-valve amp and the other is a cheap line 6 or Marshall MG/Valvestate etc.). I am more likely to use different guitars than amps as I prefer the change in tone to be a bit more subtle than switching amps (not to mention it's much easier to switch guitars than amps), but as a rule I use meatier, Les Paul-style guitars for rhythm tracking and strat or Ibanez-style guitars for leads unless the player has a preference otherwise (particularly if they find it more comfortable playing on one or the other).

As for quadtracking, as a rule I almost never quadtrack because I think it puts far too much focus on the playing being perfect twice as many times (four times, instead of twice) or the result is a mushy splattering of transients across the time domain. In fact, I find that 9 times out of 10 I prefer the sound of double-tracked guitars to quad-tracked guitars anyway, but I usually use two mics on a guitar track anyway which adds depth without having to worry so much about the timing as long as you sort out any detrimental phase issues. It is also useful to have a clean DI from the same take, for any reamping (software or genuine reamping) if the need arises.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Feb 1, 2012,