#1
I made the mistake of filling in for my band's drummer last night at practice for about 30 minutes. I didn't have any earplugs on me and didn't intend on playing for long. I'm a hard hitting drummer, but I've played before and have had similar occurrences but they've gone away. I always try to wear noise canceling headphones when playing.

I've never really had an issue with it before. Sometimes I'll heart a slight tone for a few seconds maybe a few times a year if that and I assume that's normal. My ears still feel slightly muffled and I when it's quiet I hear a very very high tone, like when doctors check your ears and play tones for you. It's not very noticeable but last night when I was trying to sleep it really bothered me until I took a sleeping pill.

My mom works in radio and is familiar with tinnitus and assures me it's just temporary, like people sometimes experience after a rock concert, and will go away soon. I'm just kind of freaking out cuz I'm a musician (and I have a sinus infection on top of this) and was hoping you guys could shed some light on the situation. Logic would say you would have to do this frequently to develop permanent damage/tinnitus. I heard it can take anywhere from 12 hours to a few days for your ears to return to normal. Looking on the internet is just freaking me out more.
#2
Yeah, I get this most practice sessions with my band (probably not helped by me refusing to wear headphones when playing since I find they distract me). I generally find this to disappear by the day after rehearsal/what caused it.

Serious damage will only really occur through constantly causing this, but always best to err on the side of caution, as any damage done will very likely be unreversible.

If your problem persists for more than a few days, or its very loud (i.e. you struggle to hear people talking to you because of the tinnitus), then I'd seriously consider seeing a doctor about it.
#3
Quote by Lordyboy
Yeah, I get this most practice sessions with my band (probably not helped by me refusing to wear headphones when playing since I find they distract me). I generally find this to disappear by the day after rehearsal/what caused it.

Serious damage will only really occur through constantly causing this, but always best to err on the side of caution, as any damage done will very likely be unreversible.

If your problem persists for more than a few days, or its very loud (i.e. you struggle to hear people talking to you because of the tinnitus), then I'd seriously consider seeing a doctor about it.


Thanks, Lordy. I feel a bit better. No, it's not loud at all unless it's silent and I can hear and understand people fine (even though I think it's still a bit muffled). I talked to some sound engineers today and they said the tone you hear is the part of your hearing that you hurt.
#4
Quote by Elemintz

My mom works in radio and is familiar with tinnitus and assures me it's just temporary, like people sometimes experience after a rock concert, and will go away soon. I'm just kind of freaking out cuz I'm a musician (and I have a sinus infection on top of this) and was hoping you guys could shed some light on the situation. Logic would say you would have to do this frequently to develop permanent damage/tinnitus. I heard it can take anywhere from 12 hours to a few days for your ears to return to normal. Looking on the internet is just freaking me out more.


If you've got a sinus infection that is likely to make the problem worse. It will probably be temporary- this time. My advice is to get yourself some earplugs as to not make this a permanent issue.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#5
Talked to a pharmacist and asked if he could recommend anything. He said no and that I can't cause permanent tinnitus just from 30 minutes to an hour of one time playing. He just said to rest my ears.

Does anyone know of some good ear plugs for practicing? I'd like to get some.
#6
I recommend Hearos. They work amazingly, and when you put them in its basically like turning down the volume on life. You still hear all your lows, and highs, but they have flat attenuation. Stops damage to your ears. I use them at practice, and at live shows. Works like a charm!


Hearos High Fidelity Ear Plugs
Days go on forever
But I have not left your side
We can chase the dark together
If you go then so will I
#7
Most in-ears will do the trick, they usually cut out a lot of the high end frequencies as they're usually the most problematic and have good isolation. That's if you don't want to spend much.

You need to take care of your ears bro, in my line of work it's absolutely essential, and if you're blasting out extremely loud volumes then you're doing some serious damage, even if it's for 30 minutes. And +1 on the Hearos, they did the trick when I used to use them.
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#9
Quote by jetfuel495
I saw a doctor once about tinnitus. He said i had developed hearing damage and there's nothing you can really do to stop the ringing.


Well not yet, anyway...
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#10
every time you hear ringing in your ear, thats the highest frequency you can hear. It is the last time you'll ever hear that pitch.


Moral is, play quieter or get something to muffle, be it earphones or earplugs or whatever.
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#11
i heard on the news tonight (oddly enough) something about a medication of some form being developed for auditory conditions including tinnitus. look into it. in the US its supposedly in its second stage of testing.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#12
If you want to be playing music for a long time, get used to ear plugs, it's really not that bad and after a while you stop noticing they're even there. Apart from when you're not deaf after you play a set.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#13
Quote by UtBDan
every time you hear ringing in your ear, thats the highest frequency you can hear. It is the last time you'll ever hear that pitch.


Whoever told you that is lying. It is broadband noise.

Quote by trashedlostfdup
i heard on the news tonight (oddly enough) something about a medication of some form being developed for auditory conditions including tinnitus. look into it. in the US its supposedly in its second stage of testing.


Which means it will be on the NHS in another 50 years. Fantastic lol.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#14
It's really good you've realised how important wearing earplugs is so soon. I've been bartending at various clubs for about a year and a half now and after every shift I'd hear ringing, waves, etc but because they went away quickly I thought nothing of it. I'd hear ringing on random occasions but again I brushed it off because I knew it would go away after a few moments.

Anyway, about 6 months ago one of my venues held a trance night and I had a 10pm-6am shift. I don't know why but dance/techno/trance dj's seem to think if ears aren't bleeding it's not loud enough, at least that was my impression. By 2am I was feeling uncomfortable, by 4am it was getting painful but I figured, it's ok, only 2 more hours. I was freaking out by 5:30, I had to keep putting my fingers over my ears.
For three days afterwards, I had a ringing in my right ear and an ocean sound in my left.

That scared me so much that I wear earplugs all the time at work and during band practice. And the random ringing has stopped! I didn't realise how much damage I was doing. I think when I'm older I'll still be affected but I'm glad I've started now. I think I have done a bit of damage already though, sometimes I'll miss the first syllable of a word when someone is talking to me or when I'm catching a train and reading a book or something, I'll hear a train coming but I'm not sure if it's coming from behind or in front.

I can't stress enough how important it is to wear earplugs. It's not lame or weak, it's having a brain. Especially when your instrument is what you want to do for the rest of your life, you can't risk things like that.

So kudos to you Elemintz for being smart from the beginning. And if that 30 minute session was the only time you've exposed your ears to excessive noise, you'll be fine
#15
The truth lies between the two extremes. Our hearing is pretty much being damaged all the time and gets less acute as we get older. There are millions of tiny sensors in the inner ear and they get damaged fairly easily. Damaged sensors either mean we lose the ability to hear certain frequencies or we get tinnitus. Over exposure to high noise levels speeds up this damage but no noise level is absolutely safe. Our ability to escape damage varies from person to person just the way we all react differently to sun exposure, some burn and some tan. the trouble with tinnitus/deafnes is that it is permanent and you won't know if you are particularly at risk until it is too late.

Any ringing in your ears is a bad sign, it may well clear up but it is a sign you over stressed your hearing. there's plenty of backup/redundancy built into your hearing so you don't need to freak out but listen to the ringing it is telling you to take more care.

I'm sure you'll be fine, the blocked sinuses certainly won't help but get the earplugs in every time. I'm a bass player and I now have tinnitus from standing next to those cymbals.

For anyone who is worried or curious you can check your own hearing in the RNID website here http://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/your-hearing/look-after-your-hearing/check-your-hearing/take-the-check.aspx?gclid=CIn_6q35kq4CFUIj3godXHvOLg