#1
Ive been recently looking to sell my Peavey 6505 212 since I am going to move into an apartment soon. This has been killing me. As soon as I find my sound, I have to move on. Then I decided that I will just end up hating myself if I end up getting rid of it so I have been looking at other options.

I have been told to look for an attenuator for my Peavey. I have a few questions about this. I have noticed the THD hotplates are popular, but have not found many alternatives. Could anyone suggest any other attenuators that I may want to check out? Ive found the 16 ohm hotplate that I need for around $200 and I am fine with that, but if there is a cheaper alternative then I am all ears. Im also wanting to know just how effective this will be. How loud will this be with the attenuator with the amp being pushed? (around 2 1/2 or 3 at least which is normally way too loud for an apartment) Thanks for looking and thanks for your opinion.
#2
I've heard the Webber attenuators are pretty good and cheaper than the hotplate.I've been thinking about getting the webber mini mass myself but would like to try one first.
#3
Alex attenuators are pretty amazing. I have one myself and I love it. Very minimal tone difference. Hot plates are popular because thd is very vocal about them. From my experience and other users' experiences, they sound like crap. They will suck your tone dry. Webber's aren't bad. When it comes to attenuators - excluding the hotplate - I've found that you really do get what you pay for. This is something that you really do need to try out for a while and A/B your tone with/without the attenuator

EDIT: There is a guy based in Canada that makes probably the best attenuators on the market but I can't remember his name right now. If I think of it I'll post back.
Last edited by vjferrara at Jan 31, 2012,
#4
Not another one of these threads.

The purpose of an attenuator is to allow you to crank the amp and drive the power tubes while remaining at a reasonable volume. The 6505 gets almost all of it's drive from the preamp section, therefore buying an attenuator for a 6505 is a waste of both time and money.

Just use the volume knob (or "post gain" as Peavey calls it).

Also, before moving in, talk to your neighbors to see if they are perfectly sane and okay with the fact that you own a guitar amplifier, before you consider selling it.


EDIT: Here's a better attenuation explanation then I could ever give: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1433637&highlight=bubb+tubbs+attenuator
Last edited by Ian_the_fox at Jan 31, 2012,
#5
I understand how an attenuator works, and I understand that most of the 6505s drive comes from the preamp. I am also aware (seeing how I own it) that it sounds pretty bad untill I at least hit 2 or 3. Im just trying to get my amp to sound a little better at a more reasonable volume. So sorry to bug you with my thread.

Thank you to everyone that is being helpful. I will definitely check out the Webber and the Alex. And vjferraram, if you remember the guys name please let me know, that would be fantastic.
#6
Quote by IC400Iceman
I understand how an attenuator works, and I understand that most of the 6505s drive comes from the preamp. I am also aware (seeing how I own it) that it sounds pretty bad untill I at least hit 2 or 3.
That's simply a combination your ears perceiving the volume and the speaker pushing more air. An attenuator will solve NOTHING. There is little to NO difference in the power section between the volume at 2-3 and below one.

Also, while I'm not a fan of 5150's, every one I played I could get a fine sound with the post below 1, INCLUDING the 120w heads. There's no excuse for not being able to get a good sound at a low volume.


You obviously haven't read this section of the link I posted:

Generally, attenuators are used by people (such as myself) who desire the huge and harmonically rich sound that power tube saturation provides, usually for blues, classic rock, hard rock, and some early genres of metal. You can get this sound by using a small, low wattage amplifier cranked up, but it isn't quite the same – there's no substitute for the huge low end of a 100W or the fisty mid leads of a 50W in the small amps, though they're great amplifiers in their own right. Since these amps are loud enough to shake your fillings loose, an attenuator is one of the few available options for cranking the volume to 11 and playing that “Somebody Get Me a Doctor” riff. (I'll deal with a few other methods later) If you're playing br00tz through a modern amp, the answer is a very clear NO. This style of music relies heavily on a tight, gainy preamp distortion and the last thing you want is power tube sag...

...If your sole desire is to quiet your 5150, I suggest you either turn the volume right down and live with it, or buy a modeler that allows you to get a reasonable facsimile of that sound through headphones, like a Pod.
Last edited by Ian_the_fox at Jan 31, 2012,
#7
Quote by Ian_the_fox
That's simply a combination your ears perceiving the volume and the speaker pushing more air. An attenuator will solve NOTHING. There is little to NO difference in the power section between the volume at 2-3 and below one.

Also, while I'm not a fan of 5150's, every one I played I could get a fine sound with the post below 1, INCLUDING the 120w heads. There's no excuse for not being able to get a good sound at a low volume.


You obviously haven't read this section of the link I posted:

Generally, attenuators are used by people (such as myself) who desire the huge and harmonically rich sound that power tube saturation provides, usually for blues, classic rock, hard rock, and some early genres of metal. You can get this sound by using a small, low wattage amplifier cranked up, but it isn't quite the same – there's no substitute for the huge low end of a 100W or the fisty mid leads of a 50W in the small amps, though they're great amplifiers in their own right. Since these amps are loud enough to shake your fillings loose, an attenuator is one of the few available options for cranking the volume to 11 and playing that “Somebody Get Me a Doctor” riff. (I'll deal with a few other methods later) If you're playing br00tz through a modern amp, the answer is a very clear NO. This style of music relies heavily on a tight, gainy preamp distortion and the last thing you want is power tube sag...

...If your sole desire is to quiet your 5150, I suggest you either turn the volume right down and live with it, or buy a modeler that allows you to get a reasonable facsimile of that sound through headphones, like a Pod.


Very misunderstood topic.

Not all true for every situation. There is a HUGE difference below 1 and 2/3. High gain amp like 5150 you aren't after power tube distortion.

OP- find one local that has a return policy and see if it fits what you are looking for.
Last edited by R45VT at Jan 31, 2012,
#8
Quote by R45VT
Very misunderstood topic.

Not all true for every situation. There is a HUGE difference below 1 and 2/3. High gain amp like 5150 you aren't after power tube distortion.

OP- find one local that has a return policy and see if it fits what you are looking for.


While your right, there is a huge sound difference when say volume at 1, rather than 2 or 3, however if use an attenuator it won't sound better. Turning it to 3, then using an attenuator to lower the volume to what it was on 1 won't make it sound any better. It just starts to open up at that volume from a fizzier tone when its at 1.
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#9
Quote by R45VT
Not all true for every situation.
Indeed, not true for every situation, but this a 6505 we're talking about.

Quote by R45VT
There is a HUGE difference below 1 and 2/3.
In terms of room reverberation, speaker vibration, air vibration, yes there is. But the tone coming directly from the amp itself remains nearly the same. Don't believe me? Mic up and record a track using a 5150 with volume at 1. Then turn the volume to three and back the mic up about 3/4 of a foot (to be proportionate with the vibration area of the speaker), and re-record. If done right the tone should be nearly identical.


Really, TS, your money would be much better spent with one of these: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/musicians-gear-deluxe-amp-stand/451065000001000

Not only will you hear the sound directly from the speaker better but you also won't bother neighbors as much as it rids the floor of the amp's vibrations, and cuts some of the unnecessary low-end that is gained when you operate it at higher levels. It will also serve you better if you ever plan on gigging.
#10
I can play at loud volumes, and I still use an attenuator, and I play hard rock/metal. JCA50H and Peavey 5150.

I generally have the amps master volumes at about where they would be for gig volume, and have the attenuator bring the volume down to about what it would be with the master at 2 or so. It does make a difference. If the attenuator you get doubles as a load box, then you can use it through a DAW and speaker impulse response and play with headphones (I do this when it gets late).

Everyone has this misconception that attenuators are "only for classic rock/blues/whatever power tube distortion" and my response is simply f*ck that.


To the OP - honestly an attenuator might not help you that much. If anything get something with a headphone jack - weber has it as option on most of their attenuators.
#11
If you are set on one, get the Weber Mass Lite 100 (u want it to be able to handle at least twice ur amps wattage). It's cheaper and better than just about every other option.
A better option than that would be to use the money on a practice amp instead. A Roland Cube or Vyper.

Attenuating down to conversation levels on that amp will significantly shorten the life of your power tubes.
#12
Quote by JoePerry4life
While your right, there is a huge sound difference when say volume at 1, rather than 2 or 3, however if use an attenuator it won't sound better. Turning it to 3, then using an attenuator to lower the volume to what it was on 1 won't make it sound any better. It just starts to open up at that volume from a fizzier tone when its at 1.


I was really trying counter "Ian the light bulb for tubes" giving regurgitated info he doesn't know much about.
#13
Quote by R45VT
I was really trying counter "Ian the light bulb for tubes" giving regurgitated info he doesn't know much about.
No, just going by how my amp works and how every 5150/6505 I've ever had experience with worked when I played them. No tonal difference whatsoever between 1 and 3, except my nads vibrate with the low end.

The only reason I could think of anyone wanting to crank up a high gain amp is to feel the incredible pounding and crushing low end that fluctuates your chest back and forth and sends shockwaves up and down your spine with every slow palm muted chord, and to feel the intense moving shockwave you get when you dive-bomb on a Floyd to such a low frequency that it nearly releases your bodily fluids on the spot. Based on my past experiences an attenuator allows the amp to do none of that.

Also keep in mind the TS owns the 6505 combo. In order to even use a typical attenuator he'd have to wire up 2 sets speaker jacks so he can plug it up, and go through all of that work only for it to make very little to no difference. But hey, at least if he fools himself into thinking it sounds better, that means the problem is solved, right?
#14
Quote by Ian_the_fox


Also keep in mind the TS owns the 6505 combo. In order to even use a typical attenuator he'd have to wire up 2 sets speaker jacks so he can plug it up, and go through all of that work only for it to make very little to no difference. But hey, at least if he fools himself into thinking it sounds better, that means the problem is solved, right?


Nope. All you have to do is unplug the speakers from the inside jack, and run it ouside to either the attenuator output - or to the 5150 external speaker jack when you don't need to attenuate.
#15
Quote by 667
Nope. All you have to do is unplug the speakers from the inside jack, and run it ouside to either the attenuator output - or to the 5150 external speaker jack when you don't need to attenuate.


#16
hotplates are amazing attenuators and dont let someone tell you they arent. I use the 16 ohm as part of my set up and cant imagine not using one BUT, you being in an apt, it will not really help you get to the "whisper" level
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Last edited by madh4ttr at Feb 1, 2012,
#18
Quote by Ian_the_fox
Wrong combo. The TS owns the 212, not the 112. In the 212 the speakers are wired:



You are looking at the wrong end. Follow those wires up into the amp. They all merge into a 1/4 plug that is plugged into an internal jack. Take off the top back cover (the one that you remove to access the tubes) - it's in there.
Last edited by 667 at Feb 1, 2012,
#19
Sorry, an attenuator isn't particularly unsuitable on this occasion.


However - there is hope!



For the price of a good attenuator, you could get an Eminence Reignmaker, which uses flux density modulation. You know it's good when they start using words like 'flux modulation', eh?

It's basically a speaker with adjustable efficiency, meaning it works like an attenuator but with none of the disadvantages. Great tone at much lower volume, and all built into the speaker so you can connect it up and then forget about it forever.
#20
Quote by kyle62
Sorry, an attenuator isn't particularly unsuitable on this occasion.


However - there is hope!



For the price of a good attenuator, you could get an Eminence Reignmaker, which uses flux density modulation. You know it's good when they start using words like 'flux modulation', eh?

It's basically a speaker with adjustable efficiency, meaning it works like an attenuator but with none of the disadvantages. Great tone at much lower volume, and all built into the speaker so you can connect it up and then forget about it forever.


That is one of the coolest ideas I've seen in a long time. Regarding the attenuaters, +1 on Weber. I have a Hot Plate that I use with my Marshall and a MiniMass for my small amps. ght my THD years ago but if I were looking for one today I would probably go with the Weber Mass because of it's flexibility and good tone. My MiniMass steps on my tone far less at high attenuation settings than my MiniMass does. Another great option if you do get the attenuator is to set it to load and run it's line out into a SS power amp. That will let you adjust from a whisper to roar with virtually no change in tone.
#21
Hi everyone

And what about combo amps? I've bought recently a 6505 212 combo, and I'm also moving to an apartment. So I'd like to know if is it possible to plug a power attenuator in it, or it only works on head and speakers separated models.

If it works, I could try one, and if it doesn't make any difference I would return it to the store. But at first I need to know if is it possible to connect them.

Sorry for my poor english, but I'm talking from Brazil.

Thanks
#22
This entire thread is about what you are asking.
Short answer, on your amp, yes - they work. You will have to unplug the speakers from the amp on the inside (they plug into a 1/4" internal output jack found in the top section of the enclosure) and route the cable out to the attenuator.
Last edited by 667 at May 17, 2012,
#23
Quote by 667
This entire thread is about what you are asking.
Short answer, on your amp, yes - they work. You will have to unplug the speakers from the amp on the inside (they plug into a 1/4" internal output jack found in the top section of the enclosure) and route the cable out to the attenuator.



Thanks a lot, 667.