#1
For the longest time now, I've noticed that when I have some kind of backing beat, I can make strong melodies much, much easier. When I don't have a backing beat, I usually just dabble random crap that has no direction.

Am I the only one who has a hard time creating a good melody without some kind of backing rhythm to go by? Or is that some kind of shortcoming on my end?
Last edited by vermanubis at Jan 31, 2012,
#2
I'm sure somebody will disagree, but rhythm is so much more important that note choice for creating a strong melodic line. Pretty sure Guthrie Govan has said that, as long as you have a really solid rhythm, you can play whichever notes you like and it will sound passable at the very least. And when you take that to extremes you end up with Free Jazz, where note selection isn't planned or structured to follow theory, but the all important aspect is the flow (or lack of maybe) of the music.
So basically it's not a shortcoming at all, it means you're on the right lines
#3
How much music do you listen to that has no rhythm?

Not much, I bet. There's no shortcoming there, you need rhythm in your melody. With practise though, you might be able to just hear a rhythm in your head and play a melody along to it instead of using a backing track.
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#4
I think it was Victor Wooten that said even when you're soloing or just playing a melody, you have to keep the groove going. So with no backing track, I think it helps to sort of feel one in your head as you're playing.

Just read what Dayn said. So yeeea...
#5
Quote by theknuckster
I'm sure somebody will disagree, but rhythm is so much more important that note choice for creating a strong melodic line. Pretty sure Guthrie Govan has said that, as long as you have a really solid rhythm, you can play whichever notes you like and it will sound passable at the very least. And when you take that to extremes you end up with Free Jazz, where note selection isn't planned or structured to follow theory, but the all important aspect is the flow (or lack of maybe) of the music.
So basically it's not a shortcoming at all, it means you're on the right lines


+1
#6
i think its probably normal. im the same way. i can come up with melodies much faster to a backing rhythm than if i was alone. i think its probably because the progression and melody kind of suggest certain things. like depending on the chords, some notes may be better to highlight at certain times or perhaps the harmony will sound different if you used a different chord in its place.

i kind of agree with the first response. if the chord progression is strong and has a good rhythm, it almost doesnt matter what you play. chances are you will land on a good melody, or maybe a super simple one that might sound kinda lame on its own. a lot of rock riffs are like that actually.