#1
How would i go about switching keys in a song? Say I'm in A, how would i go about switching the key to G if i wanted?
#2
V7-I. If you're in A, then you can go to basically any key if you go V7-I. So, for your example something like A-D-E7-A-D7-G-Amin-D7-G would firmly plant you initially in A and then move you into G and confirm G as well.

Extra bit: It's easier to be convincing if you go to a key that has a tonic in the key, if you follow me.

For example,the diatonic chords in major are I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viidim, and the easiest keys to modulate to are ii, iii, IV, V, and vi (there's no viidim, because you can't make a diminished chord a tonic chord). Notice that they make up the relative minor, the subdominant chord, the dominant chord and their respective relative minors.
That said, you can modulate anywhere you want, those are just what are called "closely related keys."
#3
First of all, changing keys in a song is called modulation. (Wikipedia that)

The relationship between keys is defined by the circle of fifths. (Wikipedia that too)

From any given key, you can move either clockwise or counterclockwise on the circle, and each time you do you change one note in the scale - lower the 7th if you move forwards, and raise the 4th to move backwards.

Jazz rock is right the fastest and easiest way to change keys is to use a V7-I transition. But you can be more subtle about it. You can use pivot chords.

For example to get from A to G, you pull out your circle of fifths and notice you have to go forward two keys from A to get to G. A -> D - > G. In doing this you lower the 7th both times. So from A to D, you change your G# to G. and from D to G you change your C# to C. Now you can simply use a ii-V7-I like jazz rock suggested. Or you can for example use a chord common to all these keys such as B minor or D. Go like, A-Bm-D7-G. YOu can strech it out and first modulate to D and then G, and that way it'll sound more smooth.
Last edited by bouttimeijoined at Jan 31, 2012,
#4
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
V7-I. If you're in A, then you can go to basically any key if you go V7-I. So, for your example something like A-D-E7-A-D7-G-Amin-D7-G would firmly plant you initially in A and then move you into G and confirm G as well.

Extra bit: It's easier to be convincing if you go to a key that has a tonic in the key, if you follow me.

For example,the diatonic chords in major are I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viidim, and the easiest keys to modulate to are ii, iii, IV, V, and vi (there's no viidim, because you can't make a diminished chord a tonic chord). Notice that they make up the relative minor, the subdominant chord, the dominant chord and their respective relative minors.
That said, you can modulate anywhere you want, those are just what are called "closely related keys."


Sir, I fear that it is my dismal duty to inform you that the entire progress and yield of my humours and energies will culminate in the suspension of this most egregious assertion. Forgive my impudence, sir, and may you be blessed with many cadenzas in the keys of your respective Dominants.
You might could use some double modals.
#6
ARETHA ^^^ You may have a point, although it's hard to spot one in your post above. Please expand with proper explanation and use of examples where appropriate.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Quote by AETHERA
Sir, I fear that it is my dismal duty to inform you that the entire progress and yield of my humours and energies will culminate in the suspension of this most egregious assertion. Forgive my impudence, sir, and may you be blessed with many cadenzas in the keys of your respective Dominants.

Man, that's awesome.

TS,
--------
-2-3-3-3
-2-4-5-4
-2-4-4-5
-0-0-0-
-------3
Last edited by mdc at Jan 31, 2012,
#8
To be completely honest, my post didn't contribute a thing to the thread and it was intended as a jest, but I think that Shostakovich succeeded in at least temporarily tonicizing a diminished triad in one his Fantastic Dances. Debussey made it work in some parts of Jeux, but I don't have the music on either of those to point out what the hell is actually making it possible.

I'd actually like to look at secondary dominants, borrowed chords, and alterations to achieve this effect, but my attempts are informal at best and it will be quite some time messing with three and four voices to get something that works. I'll edit this post later once I've thrown my fingers at my other set of keys until I've satisfied this fiendish impulse to not fail where there is an opportunity for something oblique and esoteric to be brought to ear.

In a pedantic sense of arguing, the reason that there isn't a secondary dominant for the diminished chord is because the basic movements and sound of the change between the two does not result in a feeling of ending or rest. Were the chord major or minor instead of diminished, I'd bet you could put a secondary dominant in front of it. Just because there is not a simple dominant method to resolve to a diminished chord does not mean that it can't be a tonic. I'd be tempted off of the top of my head to turn this into a debate on the merits of our Locrian friend, but then it would be just another modes thread. D=


P.S. I feel like a librarian who just walked into a discourse on ontology in the School of Athens: acquainted and aware of the materials and ideas, but totally unable to back up a conjecture that was in turn unjustly made; noticeably anachronous, as well.*prepares to become the next liampje (sorry if you find that insulting in any way)*
You might could use some double modals.
Last edited by AETHERA at Jan 31, 2012,
#9
Oh, I thought you were actually going down some other path and was interested to hear it. No worries.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Quote by jayx124
ii V and then via the circle of fifth down to another ii V

for example B-7 | E7 | A-7 | D7
the first 2 bars are in the key of A and the next in the key of G


Hey dude, I can see what you're trying to do, but that progression alone is just in E maj. I mean, if you stuck a G - C - D thing on the end, yeah I'd agree with you that there's a key change to G, but as it stands it's a simple blues type progression (eg. What I Like About You) with a VII7 derived from the parallel minor.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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