#1
i have a question about guitar virtuosos and what seperates them for violin or piano virtuosos. For example, Steve Vai did not start playing until he was 13. Many great guitar players did not start before the age of ten. On the other hand, most violiin and piano virtuosos start before the age of 7.

How come guitar players can start late and still be outstanding but not for other instruments like violin/piano? Just curious.
#2
Who says they can't?

If anything, the proliferation of virtuosos who started young in a classical setting is merely because, well... if you wanted your child to get into music, how many groups could your child join in a rock setting, compared to a classical one?
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#3
its not about starting late. and the only reason guitarists start late, is i would say guitar isn't really considered a classical instrument, which parents who can afford the lessons seem to value above the others.

i've asked many people about becoming virtuoso on guitar vs how late you start. the only difference is the amount of time kids can put into an instrument compared to older people with commitments. according to one of my teachers (a virtuoso pianist) people who are older develop learning techniques that they then become locked into. where as kids have a rather plastic approach to learning.

so theres really very few differences between the time that people start and the affect that has on developing skill. its all about the amount of time you spend learning according to a structure. note that i said structured learning environment, something most guitarists don't really have.

i think the agreed upon amount of practice time is 10,000 hours. which seems to be the average for most music students (who have completed degrees or whatever). but i've read about people saying around 14,000 hours to become virtuoso (4 hours a day for 10 years). or something that can be achieved within 2-3 years at about 12 hours a day.

so once again, there is no difference, but the amount of time that a musician spends learning. hope that helps.
Last edited by Marshmelllow at Feb 1, 2012,
#4
Quote by Dayn
Who says they can't?

If anything, the proliferation of virtuosos who started young in a classical setting is merely because, well... if you wanted your child to get into music, how many groups could your child join in a rock setting, compared to a classical one?

i don't know many concert pianists, for example, that started after the age of ten. My friend is a violin teacher and she has said that to be a violin virtuoso, you need to start before 7.
#5
Quote by hhhhdmt
i don't know many concert pianists, for example, that started after the age of ten. My friend is a violin teacher and she has said that to be a violin virtuoso, you need to start before 7.



well your friend is a pompous twat. hope that helps too.
#6
Quote by hhhhdmt
i don't know many concert pianists, for example, that started after the age of ten. My friend is a violin teacher and she has said that to be a violin virtuoso, you need to start before 7.

Not true at all. If you learn theory early, you generally have a better grasp on it and remember it better than if you learn it later, but theory alone does not make a virtuoso, nor is it required to become a virtuoso. For technique, it doesn't matter when you start. What matters is how much time you devote to practicing and playing.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#7
I was wondering why "classical" musicians have a different approach too, i came up with 2 ideas.

1) Instruments like violin, put more stress on your body than the guitar.. which makes 12 hour marathons not so healthy in the long run..

2) Perhaps more competition?

As much as i would have liked to have started at age 7..im starting to find these kind of things disgusting:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Pl8pVszpNM
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Feb 1, 2012,
#8
Instruments like violine and piano have a long teaching tradition. Guitar is young and still in the developement process. The perfect technique is not jet set in stone.

So mainly out of tradition and because of the incredible competition in classical music. A perfect technique is considered remarkable in guitar music. It is standard in classical music. Everybody that wants to be a concert musician will have a perfect technique at the age of 18, most of them even earlier. If you want to compete you need to start that early, because the classical music industry likes young and beautiful artists.

Don´t get me wrong, technique is only a tool for a virtuoso, determining is musical expression. But sometimes I get the feeling many guitar players are so much amazed by a good technique(because of it being rarer in guitar music) that they won´t even start to develope and practise their abilities in musical expression.
Last edited by Facecut at Feb 1, 2012,
#9
^ Pretty much.

Not to mention, the hardest pieces for violin and piano are far harder than pretty much anything on the guitar. Those instruments have had centuries of virtuosi adding techniques and raising standards, the electric guitar is barely a century old.
#10
The yonger you start the more the instrument will be ingrained into your nervous system. I believe guthrie govan started at the age of 3 lol.

That doesn't mean that people who start later on can't become virtousos, it's just going to take a lot more hard work than someone who has grew up with the grew up with the guitar.

If you want your kid to be a master of anything then it is best to start them young. Look at the best golfers and tennis players etc, they start when they are like 5.

There are always exceptions
#11
Also bear in mind that "virtuoso" is solely a word other people use to describe others based on their opinion of them - it's got no inherent value as a label as it's entirely subjective, it doesn't really mean anything.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#12
Glen Tipton from Judas Priest started ages 21 and he is awesome.

Its just a case of practice.

The ones who start young are just at their physical peak when they hit the good stuff, and that makes good eye candy for the record labels.
#13
Allan Holdsworth started at around age 18
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
#14
Blues players don't peak until they are over 50 (in my opinion!).

The young 'uns may be fast and flashy, but you need to live a little to play the Blues with conviction.
#15
Virtuosos stay true to the artform without conceding to mainstream popularity, or something like that.
╘MESHUG╦G╗AH





Ibanez ARX 350
Dunlop 535Q
Ibanez TS9
Peavey TransTube Supreme
DRIVE Elite straight 412