#1
I've been playing guitar for around three years and would say I'm decent, but not incredible for my time.

Anyways, my three top guitar influences are John Frusciante, Jimi Hendrix and SRV. Now, I can play tons of RHCP, no problem, some is tougher but I've never been so stumped with a hard part that I've never been able to over come it. However, as a lot of you may know, Hendrix and SRV are both incredibly hard (to me atleast) and even there so called "easier" stuff is damn hard for me. Everytime I've tried to attempt one of there songs (with the exception of Purple Haze, for some reason I could do that one) I've failed and just gave up.

Does anyone have tips on how to advance into stuff like this? I don't expect it to just come to me but I feel so over whelmed whenever I attempt their songs.
Current Gear:
Mexican Fender Telecaster
Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
Stratocaster
Vox AC4TV
#2
Choose 1 long-term song which you can't learn fast and where you have to practice parts for a long period of time, but at the same time keep some easier-to-learn songs too.
#3
Take it slow, make sure your technique is good and, the most important part:

stop giving up, lazy ass. You will never be any good without putting in the work.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#4
Practice, practice and more practice.

Start by using a metronome on a slower tempo, working your way up gradually. It may seem the slow and boring way, but your playing will thank you for it in the long run.
#5
Just put down the guitar. You're obviously not motivated enough to practice.
The more you say 'epic' the less it means.
#6
Practice all you can. Break down the song into parts. And breaks each part into riffs. Then repeat the riffs over and over speeding up gradually
#7
Quote by Dynamight
Just put down the guitar. You're obviously not motivated enough to practice.


I don't entirely agree. If in 3 years you couldn't even start working on something hard, you should consider not going into technical stuff. Just enjoy what you know and take it easy if you can't practice hard.
#9
Quote by WesCThomp
I like to break parts down songs bar by bar. Or a few bars at a time.



This is what I did when it came to learning Hendrix and SRV songs. I recommend learning Little Wing a bar or two a day to start out. Once you've memorized it, keep practicing until you can reach the right speed. After you get 3 or 4 of their songs down they actually become more predictable.
#10
Quote by Dynamight
Just put down the guitar. You're obviously not motivated enough to practice.

yeap....that's an inspiring and helpful comment....you could just have said WE DONT NEED ANY MORE GUITARISTS IN THE WORLD!!! seriously man,it's as if it's a competition....if art was a competion then there is nothing in the world to lousen you up...anyway to the TS...don't give a ****...just play what you feel..it's not bad to surpass yourself sometimes but don't sweat it too much....it's music....chill
#11
Quote by fairytaleman
yeap....that's an inspiring and helpful comment....you could just have said WE DONT NEED ANY MORE GUITARISTS IN THE WORLD!!! seriously man,it's as if it's a competition....if art was a competion then there is nothing in the world to lousen you up...anyway to the TS...don't give a ****...just play what you feel..it's not bad to surpass yourself sometimes but don't sweat it too much....it's music....chill


To be fair, his advice is true.

The TS isn't motivated enough to play if he is giving up so easily. To get really good at anything, you have to put serious time and effort into it.

If you can't play something then figure out why you can't play it and then fix the problem. If the problem is that your technique isn't good enough, then sit down and work on it.
#12
Quote by mrbabo91
To be fair, his advice is true.

The TS isn't motivated enough to play if he is giving up so easily. To get really good at anything, you have to put serious time and effort into it.

If you can't play something then figure out why you can't play it and then fix the problem. If the problem is that your technique isn't good enough, then sit down and work on it.


exactly...this is advice.you for example posted someting the ts can work with...the other post just seems judgemental...I wound't be helped by that and more importantly I wouldn't be motivated by that(which is why the ts created the thread in the first place)
#13
would it help you if I told you to get a certain dvd series to see how hendrix songs for example are aproached?it surely gave me a boost when I needed it.i don't know if I am allowed to advertise the series so I won't say the name....if there is no problem i'll post it.
#14
TS

What do you want to get out of the guitar ?

Are you playing to impress family friends, are you playing because you find it enjoyable and its a good way to pass time or do you want to write and record music, play gigs and possibly one day get session work or teach guitar.
#15
Take a break from learning covers and start playing leads.

Find a backing track you like and start playing over it making it up as you go. It'll be slow and awkward at first but eventually you develop your OWN style. Thats something you'll never get from playing covers. Eventually you'll make your own licks and begin noodling around the neck easily. With time you'll speed it up and employ legato techniques. Having a good knowledge of scales and basic theory will help you expand your comfort zone.

There is no point in perfecting other people's music. Yes it's good practice doing covers that you like but try to use those covers to develop your own way of playing. You can, or rather should, only master your own material.

As the years go by and your try another cover here and there you'll notice it takes far less time to get it down. And the techniques you learn form those covers you can add to your own style of playing.

-Tony
#16
Thanks everyone, I think I'll takenit slow and just work on it slower(bar by bar like westcthomp said ) and keep easier songs on the side like orynn said. Also thanks fairytaleman, I know the series but appreciate the help.
Current Gear:
Mexican Fender Telecaster
Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
Stratocaster
Vox AC4TV
#17
You could always invest in the Learn to play Jimi Hendrix DVD from Lick Library. It's about £18 on Amazon.

I bought it about 3 weeks ago and it's brilliant. It takes you through a lot of his techniques, riffs and so on. I found Hey Joe to be fairly straightforward to learn. Enough to be able to accompany myself and do the solo.
#18
1) Find hard song
2) Play slowly each section, see what you've never done before
3) Practice those
4) String together and go get laid due to your epicness.

I did this with pretty much all Loomis songs, now I can play any 1 3 5 arpeggio at 200 bpm anywhere after about a year of grinding it out... eventually you just learn to do it in all the positions through time.
... and then you get bored and start looking up other shapes once you master the one you set out to and find yourself at ground zero again getting butt slammed.
It's spelled wiener.
#19
I was in the same boat. I could play more technical things like Dream Theater and Paul Gilbert, but I had a really hard time playing SRV. It's not that it was too difficult, it was just a different style of playing than I was used to. The answer to your problem, as others have said, is practice. Do some improve more in his bluesy style. Learn some of his licks and incorporate it into your playing. Sooner or later you will get more used to that style and playing his stuff will feel more comfortable.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.