#1
Hey all,

Just wondering if anybody here attends or attended Humber College for guitar. I just applied and i'm awaiting for word of when my audition is. There is a myriad of jazz requirements.

Any tips, info on the audition process would be most appreciated.
#2
Every place is different. Give them a call and ask.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Not a student there, but I've done some jazz auditions at the University of Minnesota, and I'll put in my two cents if you care to listen. I took a look at the requirements on the website and will comment on each one:

Scales - Try to use more than one position in your scales. Don't get stuck in a "box" of only notes in 6th position. One score listed on jazz audition forms is typically range. This is meant for the improvisation, but your scales can tell them that you know how to move around the neck comfortably. Nix the vibrato if you use it, because it isn't great for ensemble playing, which I assume you'll do quite a bit of at a music school.

Triad Arpeggios - This is personal, but find a good place to shift. It may not hurt to do the first arpeggio one way (first note one string, second and third notes next string) and then the next differently (first two notes one string, third note next string).

Chord Voicings - This is definitely important. Learn two versions of each chord for a root on the lowest three strings, although you probably won't use the roots. Two notes is just fine, as long as they are the third and the seventh. If the chord lists an alteration, make sure you get it, and change up the location of that note. Also, the EbMaj7 chord gives you a chance to get their attention. Depending on how many voicings you are required to play, one very jarring voicing is to place a D, 7th fret on the G string, and an Eb, 4th fret on the B string, along with any G you want. The minor second really can grab attention, and I'm told it's a favorite of Thelonius Monk.

I-VI-II-V Progressions - Pay attention to what they call "smooth chord connecting". The most basic way to do this is to keep notes close to each other, utilizing the same strings. What they're really looking is for is to keep some notes exactly the same between chords, and having a mix of notes moving up while some move down. Basically, find voicings for each chord that keep you from moving more than a fret at a time. You can, and should, have a general direction with your voicings. For instance, your chords may just keep getting lower and lower as you go, as long as you aren't just shifting around to the most convenient voicing for each chord.

Improvising - Just choose your styles wisely. Definitely play a blues progression, and something that uses chord changes, then toss up between latin or ballad I guess. If you feel playing slow and with feeling is a strength of yours, definitely choose a ballad, like "In a Sentimental Mood".

Chord Melody - If you try to keep the same guidelines as the I-VI-II-V progressions, you should be fine. If you find a chord melody arrangement of a jazz standard that you like to listen to, learn it to the best of your ability. This will be a strong assessment of your individual capabilities. (and certainly not my cup of tea to play)
#4
Quote by guitarsolo_17
Not a student there, but I've done some jazz auditions at the University of Minnesota, and I'll put in my two cents if you care to listen. I took a look at the requirements on the website and will comment on each one:

Scales - Try to use more than one position in your scales. Don't get stuck in a "box" of only notes in 6th position. One score listed on jazz audition forms is typically range. This is meant for the improvisation, but your scales can tell them that you know how to move around the neck comfortably. Nix the vibrato if you use it, because it isn't great for ensemble playing, which I assume you'll do quite a bit of at a music school.

Triad Arpeggios - This is personal, but find a good place to shift. It may not hurt to do the first arpeggio one way (first note one string, second and third notes next string) and then the next differently (first two notes one string, third note next string).

Chord Voicings - This is definitely important. Learn two versions of each chord for a root on the lowest three strings, although you probably won't use the roots. Two notes is just fine, as long as they are the third and the seventh. If the chord lists an alteration, make sure you get it, and change up the location of that note. Also, the EbMaj7 chord gives you a chance to get their attention. Depending on how many voicings you are required to play, one very jarring voicing is to place a D, 7th fret on the G string, and an Eb, 4th fret on the B string, along with any G you want. The minor second really can grab attention, and I'm told it's a favorite of Thelonius Monk.

I-VI-II-V Progressions - Pay attention to what they call "smooth chord connecting". The most basic way to do this is to keep notes close to each other, utilizing the same strings. What they're really looking is for is to keep some notes exactly the same between chords, and having a mix of notes moving up while some move down. Basically, find voicings for each chord that keep you from moving more than a fret at a time. You can, and should, have a general direction with your voicings. For instance, your chords may just keep getting lower and lower as you go, as long as you aren't just shifting around to the most convenient voicing for each chord.

Improvising - Just choose your styles wisely. Definitely play a blues progression, and something that uses chord changes, then toss up between latin or ballad I guess. If you feel playing slow and with feeling is a strength of yours, definitely choose a ballad, like "In a Sentimental Mood".

Chord Melody - If you try to keep the same guidelines as the I-VI-II-V progressions, you should be fine. If you find a chord melody arrangement of a jazz standard that you like to listen to, learn it to the best of your ability. This will be a strong assessment of your individual capabilities. (and certainly not my cup of tea to play)


Thank you, I found this post extremely helpful.

For the Scales, I plan to play the traditional Box style for half, and the other half will be the three notes per string variation. I have to know the melodic minor, harmonic minor, and major scales.

I'm going to have to work very hard on my voicings, progressions, and improvising as I am quite new to those.

My Chord Melody will be "In the Wee Small Hours of The Morning" by Frank Sinatra. Thoughts?