#1
I'm not exactly sure where this should go, so feel free to move it/point me in the right direction or whatever.

But anyway, my job's been kinda cutting hours lately and it's hard to find another part time gig with flexible hours. So I thought, why not give guitar lessons? Problem is, I've not a single clue how to teach haha I mean, I've been playing for a good five or six years, but where would you start? How would you develop a curriculum for each student? Any sort of advice would be super duper.
Honey mustard is best mustard.
#2
Kindergarten: Mary had a little lamb
Grade 1: Greenday
Grade 2: Dragonforce
Grade 3: John Petrucci's worst solo
Grade 4: John Petrucci's best solo
Grade 5: Steve Vai's best solo with one hand
Grade 6: Michael Angelo Batio's entire discography with only ones dick
Grade 7: Two Beethoven symphonies at once
Grade 8: Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
#3
Quote by Pagan_Poetry
Kindergarten: Mary had a little lamb
Grade 1: Greenday
Grade 2: Dragonforce
Grade 3: John Petrucci's worst solo
Grade 4: John Petrucci's best solo
Grade 5: Steve Vai's best solo with one hand
Grade 6: Michael Angelo Batio's entire discography with only ones dick
Grade 7: Two Beethoven symphonies at once
Grade 8: Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

Too slow paced. I think they'd get bored pretty quickly.
"People like Coldplay and voted for the Nazis; you can't trust people."
#4
Quote by Pagan_Poetry
Kindergarten: Mary had a little lamb
Grade 1: Greenday
Grade 2: Dragonforce
Grade 3: John Petrucci's worst solo
Grade 4: John Petrucci's best solo
Grade 5: Steve Vai's best solo with one hand
Grade 6: Michael Angelo Batio's entire discography with only ones dick
Grade 7: Two Beethoven symphonies at once
Grade 8: Twinkle Twinkle Little Star


lol at green day before dragonforce.
I learnt TTFATF waayyyyy before I learnt American Idiot.
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#5
Quote by Dory77
Too slow paced. I think they'd get bored pretty quickly.


It's a beginner's class though

Quote by Trowzaa
lol at green day before dragonforce.
I learnt TTFATF waayyyyy before I learnt American Idiot.


It's a trick way of getting the toughest bits over with. Makes easier, more commercial music much easier to grasp
#6
I focused more on classifying where my students were skill level wise (beginner, intermediate, advanced) and then taught techniques appropriate for both the skill level, and the pieces they wanted to learn. However, thats just my personal preference. Basically, just identify where their playing is at and the styles they like, and teach them what they wanna know.
GEAR:
Jackson JS30KE
ESP EC 401FM
Ibanez RG 321MH
Peavey 6505+ 112

Brice HXB 405GL2TS
ESP B154DX
Ampeg BA-108

TC Electronics Polytune
Vox Classic Wah
#7
The big thing is to teach them HOW to practice and not just give them things to practice. If they learn proper practicing methods from you, then they'll advance much faster and you won't be bored trying to teach them Slayer riffs week after week.
Check out my band Disturbed
#8
my friend josh gives guitar lessons on the site Bandhappy, he's like the only one on there who isn't famous. theres lots of guitarists and drummers from moderately big bands giving lessons on there.

edit: Josh Kikta Thelander in case anybody was wondering

edit2: i guess its kinda obvious but i didnt read the OP i thought you were looking for a teacher
your whisper may sway the weak, but when i speak it roars the seas
Last edited by SanchoII at Feb 2, 2012,
#9
Don't teach. We don't need any more awful guitar teachers.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#10
I've done some teaching the last couple of years and though I'm far from a perfect, here are a few things I've learned that might be helpful:

- I've found that before you teach them anything, you take the time to find out not only what styles of music they like and/or what techniques they want to learn, but also what they ultimately want to get out of it. I think a lot of us that are at least semi serious musicians forget that not everyone wants to be the Jimmy Page of their generation. Some people just want to strum a few chords just for the fun of it and you should approach that lesson accordingly

- Always write down your lesson plan and weekly assignment for each student in a notebook/laptop/whatever. It seems obvious but I didn't do it at first and it bit me in the ass...

- When you're trying to teach a concept to a student, I've always found it helpful to find a song they might like that would make them understand that concept to them and make it more relevant to them. On the flip side, if they want to learn a song, maybe you could try and break it down a little bit and find a concept to work on within the song that could help the student improve

- If you're student is younger (aka below the age of 16 or so), try to be as friendly as possible to the parents (this also applies if the student is an adult to make friends with him/her). Just a little friendly behavior can leave a good impression on them and they could recommend you to some of their friends. I got about 4 or 5 extra students that way.

Hope this helps!