#1
Hello bass guitar players ,

I may be looking at buying a bass, solely for recording purposes,
I'd be using it in my 'home studio', recording directly through my tascam us144 mkii, using free vst's.

Would this be a good idea?

My budget would be around €200 (around 250 USD), and I'd be using it for styles suck as rock, punk, but mainly hardcore and metalcore.

Thanks,
Bauwke.

#2 of the Orange TH30 Clique
Gear:
Orange TH30 Head
Orange PPC410 Cab
Ibanez ART500e
Cort KX5
Almansa 434 Cedro
#3
I would save just a bit and get Squier VM P-bass for about 280 USD.
You can use your recording interface to add effects, and because the bass is passive it will sound a little better.

Id recomend line 6 usd interfaces if you don't already own one. They're reliable and support direct monitoring which is nice.

Best of luck
Smoke 'em 'til ya die.
#4
Can't go wrong with a jazz or precision bass. Look into the Squier Vintage Modified basses or maybe a used Mexican or US Fender (if your budget stretches).
signature
#5
I already have an interface, will be looking at the squier basses, any other specific brands I should be looking at? And if I were to buy a small bass amp, would there be any good lowbudget ones?

#2 of the Orange TH30 Clique
Gear:
Orange TH30 Head
Orange PPC410 Cab
Ibanez ART500e
Cort KX5
Almansa 434 Cedro
#6
If you go Squier, I have a Classic Vibe, amazing quality for the price! As for amps, anything under 50watts will be about the same. A 30-50watt should do you for practice/recording(mic'd). You could probably go even smaller though. 10-25watts won't be as loud in the bass department as a bigger amp, but it would be plenty without other instruments. I've heard a lot of people say Kustom 10w is way loud. I have a 15 year old Rogue 30w I still use and I can get good tones from it. It just takes knowing the instrument (in this case amp) and knowing what each frequency/knob does. For recording though, going direct with a P-bass sounds great. There's a reason it's the classic/standard bass.
#7
Hmm I'm not sure you really need to buy a bass just for recording. If you like the tone from your bass, then give it a good setup, make sure the intonation is good and the action isn't giving you too much string buzzing and it ought to sound fine.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#8
Quote by eddiehimself
Hmm I'm not sure you really need to buy a bass just for recording. If you like the tone from your bass, then give it a good setup, make sure the intonation is good and the action isn't giving you too much string buzzing and it ought to sound fine.


He's obviously a guitar player, not a bassist.

Anyway, as has been recommended, the Squier stuff is probably the safest bet. Specifically look at the VM/CV stuff. Depends on the kind of music you're playing, but I'd say probably a jazz would be the better choice. Slimmer neck and such which is likely more comfortable for somebody used to a smaller instrument, and more versatile in the different tones it can produce. If you don't use much distortion, a P-bass could also be a good option, but I find that they get lost too easily most of the times in environments with lots of distorted guitars.

Also, I wouldn't really bother with an amp. If your interface doesn't have instrument inputs, buy a DI box and go straight in. An amp is a waste of money that could be invested elsewhere (ie, a better bass) if you're only going to be using it in the studio. Most of the better tones are to be had from DI boxes, you can always use some amp simulation if you feel you want it.
#9
Quote by Ziphoblat
He's obviously a guitar player, not a bassist.


I don't recall it saying anywhere that he didn't have a bass already.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#10
Quote by eddiehimself
I don't recall it saying anywhere that he didn't have a bass already.





OT: Personally, I'd look for a used Ibanez SR. If you can find one in that price range, you're golden.
They have very thin necks which guitar players get along with pretty well, two pickups with a variety of sounds and an active EQ which I find very handy for recordings.

People will disagree, but I thought I'd at least give you a different POV
Quote by UraniYum
Fuck you I'm trying to be caring and shit


Quote by Cb4rabid
Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
#11
Quote by eddiehimself
I don't recall it saying anywhere that he didn't have a bass already.


Esp Eclipse II
Fender Strat LoneStar
Martin D35 Custom Shop
Vox Night Train
Vox Heritage cab 1x12
#12
Quote by eddiehimself
I don't recall it saying anywhere that he didn't have a bass already.


Try reading the list of (guitar) gear in his signature.

As for the Ibanez, if that kind of thing floats your boat, the Ibanez probably provides the best bang for your buck in the price range. Personally I find that passive electronics sit better in a mix most of the time (in the studio), especially P or J style basses, but I suppose it's subjective.
#13
Some of the Ibanez basses have an active bypass, so they can be used as a passive bass. Not tried them that way, though. I've used a mate's Ibanez and they are very comfortable to play. Sounded good through an amp.
#14
I don't have a bass already, I was just thinking that it may be useful to have a bass around, and it's always fun to learn a new instrument.
So brands I would have to be looking at, at this price range, are squier and ibanez, and I shouldn't bother investing in an amp?

#2 of the Orange TH30 Clique
Gear:
Orange TH30 Head
Orange PPC410 Cab
Ibanez ART500e
Cort KX5
Almansa 434 Cedro