#1
Hey GG&A,

Just outta curiousity, is there a way to make those low notes in Drop B clearer? My sound just feels SO muddy right now and it's bothering me.

Right now, I'm using my Jackson SLS1 (chambered mahogany body) with a D-Sonic in the bridge position (bar facing towards the bridge.)

The amp I'm using is the same as in my sig - Jet City JCA50 through a Marshall 1960A cab.

My settings are Bass 5.5, Middle 4, Treble 6, Presence 5. I also run an Ibanez TS9 into the amp with Drive at about 10 o'clock and Tone at about 9 o'clock.

Is there anything I can do here?
Gear:
Ibanez RG3770
Ibanez S5EX1
Jackson SLS3
Jackson RR24
Jet City JCA50H
Marshall 1960A
#2
What string gauge are you using? Have you had this probem before? Have you tuned to drop B before?
#3
My string guage is 12-60 at the moment. No, I have not tuned to Drop B before, and no, I have not had this problem before either. Pretty much every higher tuning sounds fine.
Gear:
Ibanez RG3770
Ibanez S5EX1
Jackson SLS3
Jackson RR24
Jet City JCA50H
Marshall 1960A
#5
midz midz midz

You could also try an equalizer pedal or a rack EQ in the loop.
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#6
Cut the bass on the pedal (turn the tone all the way up), and maybe cut the bass off to 4-5, maybe a bit more mids and treble on the amp - turn the pedal gain down low, the pedal volume up quite high, and adjust gain on amp to suit
#7
Quote by cookies!
My string guage is 12-60 at the moment. No, I have not tuned to Drop B before, and no, I have not had this problem before either. Pretty much every higher tuning sounds fine.


Well that string gauge is fine. I use 12-60s on my rg tuned to drop B. I'm not too knowledgeable on amps so i don't think i can give too much advice as to what you could change with your amp.

I can't offer a solution other than to try the neck pickup. On my RG with 85 and 81 EMGs i know it sounds damn awful playing on the Low B with the bridge pickup on. On my schecter with seymour duncan invaders it also sounds shitty on the bridge pickup and that's in drop D.

I'd suggest just changing to the neck pickup if anything
#8
mids. and try running the ts9 with the gain on the lowest setting and the volume maxed. the gain will add more harmonics, potentially mudding up your tone
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#9
Thanks for the advice guys I'll try your advice out and see if that helps at all. Much appreciated
Gear:
Ibanez RG3770
Ibanez S5EX1
Jackson SLS3
Jackson RR24
Jet City JCA50H
Marshall 1960A
#10
Mids up and turn your bass down! When your in a low tuning like that you need to cut the bass pretty low because the tuning takes care of it.
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#12
Quote by flashmdg
Cut the bass on the pedal (turn the tone all the way up), and maybe cut the bass off to 4-5, maybe a bit more mids and treble on the amp - turn the pedal gain down low, the pedal volume up quite high, and adjust gain on amp to suit


Turning the tone up actually does nothing at all to the bass.
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#13
I've noticed on my JCA100H that the more you turn the gain up the more bass comes through the amp, try dialing your bass back and it should clear up somewhat. I'd also cut the presence back as the amp has a bunch of top end to it already. Your mids are fine as the amp has plenty to start with

Also, those aren't the best speakers for playing down low either

What tubes are you running in the amp?
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#14
To be honest I have no clue what tubes are in. I haven't changed them yet so whatever the stock ones are, I guess. And yeah ik they're not the best speakers for this kinda stuff but I rarely get this low anyway. My other guitars don't go much lower than Drop C# at worst, this was kind of a one time thing to see how I liked it

Thank you all, but I think at this point I might just tune up and re-setup the guitar. This is wayyyy more hassle than it's worth :/
Gear:
Ibanez RG3770
Ibanez S5EX1
Jackson SLS3
Jackson RR24
Jet City JCA50H
Marshall 1960A
#15
Replace two of the Celestions in your 1960 with tight, high-wattage speakers. The stock G12T-75s have a slight 'smiley face' voicing which is good for meal but the right speaker swap will tighten things up. You can sell off the old celestions to subsidise the upgrades.

Consider the Eminence Black Powder, Swamp Thang or maybe Texas Heat.
#16
Cut bass, like has been said. On your tubescreamer, turn the gain all the way down and the level all the way up, if that's not how you're running it already.

I'd recommend a slightly thicker string for your 7th, maybe a 62 or 64, but that's just my personal preference. I like really tight strings.

Get EMG's? Would help a lot, but idk if you want to spend that much or not.
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#17
At his scale length, I think his tension should be fine... Someone remind me what speakers are in the 1960A, are they G12T75s? Those tend to be boosted in the lows and highs... I'd suggest mixing in something with more mids, like V30s, Classic Leads, or Seventy 80s.

Like has been stated, up the tone on the Tubescreamer, maybe back the bass on the amp off a bit. Don't be afraid of the presence and treble controls, I usually keep mine about a notch or 2 below "ice pick" levels.
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#18
If you're running stock tubes then I HIGHLY recommend a tube swap. The Jet City JCA50/100 are sensitive to the tubes they run and replacing those Chinese ones will really clear up the tone of the amp overall.

I'm running a JG-5751 (old production tube) in V1 and it really adds to the 3D-ness and articulation to the tone overall, and a JJ 12ax7 longplate in V2 to clear up/smooth the lows and mids. I think with a tube swap your tone will improve quite a bit and you'll be able to play in lower tunings with ease.

Try to avoid Tung Sols in this amp as they make it rather bright sounding, and you can scoot by with EHX in the later positions but they're pretty similar to the Tung Sols. JJs work rather well.
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#19
Lower the pickup.

The higher the pickup - Less sustain, muddy, very bright sound

The lower the pickup - Darker sound, clear but still very dark, more sustain

Perfect height - Good sustain, balanced highs and lows, clear sound, not muddy, cuts through mix but not piercing
#20
Quote by Myaccount876
Lower the pickup.

The higher the pickup - Less sustain, muddy, very bright sound

The lower the pickup - Darker sound, clear but still very dark, more sustain

Perfect height - Good sustain, balanced highs and lows, clear sound, not muddy, cuts through mix but not piercing

Excellent advice.
#21
The OD tweaks and pickup height adjustments are the fairests starting bets so far. Give them a shot.

Also take into consideration how you're actually playing the guitar - you need to be a little more gentle on those lower tuned notes. Smashing the life out of your strings works great for thrash on the A string, but it's not really the best technique for well-defined, detuned guitar work.