#1
I am doing a masters degree in a health field and just wonder if its really not me...I am
doing a fieldwork placement and I just find it boring and that it doesnt really suit my personaility...hate some of my co-workers, bureaucratic nature, etc.

I dont know what to do. Nothing else really appeals...I have a bachelors degree in psychology and maybe a masters in psych would be more interesting...but jobs seem limited there.

The field im currently is has good job prospects and decent money (35 dollars an hour)...but ugh...kinda wish I could just make a career in music or guitar teaching. Quarter life crisis sucks (I am 22 years old)

anyone have any similar experiences?
#2
Why don't you look into musical fields while holding your day job? Start projects on the side until you see them as economically viable to ween yourself away from the stuff you hate.
#4
thanks for the advice Blake

I definitely am starting to now...I taught guitar part time in the past and have lots of ideas im brainstorming.

Ive been in a really depressed state last few months and havent been all that productive (well...except surviving my masters program) so I find i really difficult to get into the mindset with all the school crap I have to do. But its def good advice and I am trying for sure
#5
They will tell you that you have to have a career that you develop over the course of three decades, shoddily spent on "specializing" in something that you don't really like. They will tell you that you must pick one thing and slave away at it forever. They will tell you to be mediocre. Will you?
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#6
Everyone goes through this. You need to really think about how you feel about it. Is it regret, a grass is greener kind of feeling? Or do you really feel like you need to change? Go from there.

A lot of time, people need to find a reason to make work enjoyable. Eventually, the monotony hits you no matter what you are doing so it is up to you to prevent it.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
#7
Quote by dvm25
thanks for the advice Blake

I definitely am starting to now...I taught guitar part time in the past and have lots of ideas im brainstorming.

Ive been in a really depressed state last few months and havent been all that productive (well...except surviving my masters program) so I find i really difficult to get into the mindset with all the school crap I have to do. But its def good advice and I am trying for sure


Yeah, I mean, what do you have to lose? Just ease into things, you're certainly not running out of time soon, and you have a very nice cushion if the music stuff goes sour.

Maybe even start your own studio, or get involved with the local scene and start a label or any kind of thing like that. A whole set of possibilities right there.
#8
Quote by shikkaka
Everyone goes through this. You need to really think about how you feel about it. Is it regret, a grass is greener kind of feeling? Or do you really feel like you need to change? Go from there.

A lot of time, people need to find a reason to make work enjoyable. Eventually, the monotony hits you no matter what you are doing so it is up to you to prevent it.


thats a really good point. I worked really hard to be here...so the thought of walking away from it is unsettling. At the same time, I feel so weak emotionally and that I can snap with not much aggrivation and just feel really thin-skinned. I have never felt this way so intensely before until all these weird career feelings and questioning where I fit and whatnot...I find it very confusing
#10
I decided I was in the wrong field after spending over $150,000 on law school. At least you're having your crisis now.

It got better, by the way. I actually enjoy my current job.
Hi, I'm Peter
#11
Quote by funeralllllllll


Maslow hierarchy...what are you inferring by this post?
#13
I'll let you in on a secret - there are very few 'career paths' out there today that make you happy. As a subservient entry-level worker incapable of having a voice in industry, you are merely a pawn for the higher ups, no matter the field you are working in. The only way to fix this is to work for yourself or with your friends.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#14
Quote by Cobain_Is_King
Persevere. At least you don't work in McDonalds.

^ This.

Work is what you make of it. Some of your colleagues will always be a-holes, it happens. Also, try to avoid becoming over-specialized in a certain field.
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Your G-string sounds funny?

Thats...

...wait for it...

...what she said

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people who post spontaneously unfunny, boring cliché comments are made about as welcome as a fart in a spacesuit, on my threads.

good day, sir.
#15
Quote by im_with_theband
^ This.

Work is what you make of it. Some of your colleagues will always be a-holes, it happens. Also, try to avoid becoming over-specialized in a certain field.


what do you mean by over-specialized?

And I definitely think about just working for myself...seems tempting...although extremely difficult.
#16
Literally every thread you've been making in the past month is about how you want to do music and has a bad feeling about your current path. Take a hint from yourself.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#17
Quote by darkstar2466
I'll let you in on a secret - there are very few 'career paths' out there today that make you happy. As a subservient entry-level worker incapable of having a voice in industry, you are merely a pawn for the higher ups, no matter the field you are working in. The only way to fix this is to work for yourself or with your friends.


Or improve your position. Right now I am a software engineer and programming is ok. What I want is to design system architecture. You can't just get that job out of college, you need to work for it.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
#18
Quote by Xiaoxi
Literally every thread you've been making in the past month is about how you want to do music and has a bad feeling about your current path. Take a hint from yourself.


very true...advice from some users I have gotten here has been super helpful. I
just feel so confused about making the jump...its not exactly easy =(
#19
Quote by Xiaoxi
Literally every thread you've been making in the past month is about how you want to do music and has a bad feeling about your current path. Take a hint from yourself.

Shit, no kidding! https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/search.php?searchid=8881317

TS, do yourself a favour and choose what you really want to do. You sound completely set on music and if you work hard enough then you will still get a fair amount of money, even if it's not quite as much as the career path you've chosen right now.
West Ham United
#20
lol damn even I didnt know I made that many topics =( I really am unhappy doing this crap apparently...
#21
Quote by shikkaka
Or improve your position. Right now I am a software engineer and programming is ok. What I want is to design system architecture. You can't just get that job out of college, you need to work for it.


You need to 'work for it' because the system has people with '10-12 years of experience with XYZ' in positions like that. Even then, you are not working on systems the way you want them to be - you follow directions and design it the way it needs to be per the head technologist's standard.

Well guess what? I don't give two shits about the number of years of experience. If you can think like a champ, you're in. If you're an excellent systems person, you're in. But the only room in this world for systems thinkers who are also perfectionists is to work for themselves, set their own standards, start their own industries.

You either make things or serve things on this planet. Which one will you pick? If you choose to make things, do you have the authority to make new things of your own? If you don't, will you serve someone to make things for them?
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#22
Quote by blake1221
Why don't you look into musical fields while holding your day job? Start projects on the side until you see them as economically viable to ween yourself away from the stuff you hate.


Agreed with this guy ^.

About the co-workers thing, is that one of the things putting you off, rather than the actual career?
#23
Quote by AlexChesters
Agreed with this guy ^.

About the co-workers thing, is that one of the things putting you off, rather than the actual career?


mmm not so much...but I guess you feel it more as a student...you dont have much autonomy so youre forced to be around ppl and do things and put up with stuff you wouldnt
if you were the professional.
#24
Quote by darkstar2466
You need to 'work for it' because the system has people with '10-12 years of experience with XYZ' in positions like that. Even then, you are not working on systems the way you want them to be - you follow directions and design it the way it needs to be per the head technologist's standard.

Well guess what? I don't give two shits about the number of years of experience. If you can think like a champ, you're in. If you're an excellent systems person, you're in. But the only room in this world for systems thinkers who are also perfectionists is to work for themselves, set their own standards, start their own industries.

You either make things or serve things on this planet. Which one will you pick? If you choose to make things, do you have the authority to make new things of your own? If you don't, will you serve someone to make things for them?


Apparently we have a fundamentally different outlook on this topic. The extent to which I disagree with you (and agree, as well) would start a thread itself.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
#25
Quote by dvm25
very true...advice from some users I have gotten here has been super helpful. I
just feel so confused about making the jump...its not exactly easy =(

No it's not easy, but it's doable if you have the drive, discipline, and intelligence. From the questions you've asked about music however, I'm not so sure you're in a position to teach music.

What I can tell you as someone who is going into this field, the music industry is a huge one with many different types of jobs. A lot of them technical, legal, and others. You're not limited to making it big (not going to happen) or be a nobody who resorts to teaching. If you start learning and absorbing now about computer technology for audio, publishing and administration, business relations and networking, and the core of music such as orchestration/arranging, tonal theory, songwriting, you have a wide set of assets to offer. Being a musician is being the CEO of a business--the business of you.

While going to a good music program (University of Southern CA, CalArts, Berklee, etc) will accelerate the process and of course be a hefty investment, there are plenty of online resources that are cheap or free:
-Keep up to date with business news, especially publications that analyze how to be better as a professional.
-Subscribe to www.lynda.com, which has an entire library of comprehensive and concise video lessons on music technology from the foundations to the advanced techniques.
-Study and analyze great music.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#26
If Psychology interests you, and you are thinking about getting a Master's, then don't stop there, go straight for your PhD. That will open up the job market for you, like the rest of the social sciences it's very versatile, you just need to have a high degree.
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What happened to Snake?

Snake?

Snake?

SNAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAKE?!


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Isis is amazing
#27
Quote by shikkaka
Apparently we have a fundamentally different outlook on this topic. The extent to which I disagree with you (and agree, as well) would start a thread itself.


Living a 'happy life' climbing the bureaucratic ladder is one of the saddest things I can think of. But yeah, this definitely deserves its own thread of discussion.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#28
This is an excellent post. Thankyou for this. You're right...I def am not at the level
I want to be at when it comes to teaching...got TONS of work ahead of me...but I am
super dedicated and very motivated (I think being in a competitive masters program demonsrates this) so I dont feel its out of reach...I intend to do some RCM training as well


Quote by Xiaoxi
No it's not easy, but it's doable if you have the drive, discipline, and intelligence. From the questions you've asked about music however, I'm not so sure you're in a position to teach music.

What I can tell you as someone who is going into this field, the music industry is a huge one with many different types of jobs. A lot of them technical, legal, and others. You're not limited to making it big (not going to happen) or be a nobody who resorts to teaching. If you start learning and absorbing now about computer technology for audio, publishing and administration, business relations and networking, and the core of music such as orchestration/arranging, tonal theory, songwriting, you have a wide set of assets to offer. Being a musician is being the CEO of a business--the business of you.

While going to a good music program (University of Southern CA, CalArts, Berklee, etc) will accelerate the process and of course be a hefty investment, there are plenty of online resources that are cheap or free:
-Keep up to date with business news, especially publications that analyze how to be better as a professional.
-Subscribe to www.lynda.com, which has an entire library of comprehensive and concise video lessons on music technology from the foundations to the advanced techniques.
-Study and analyze great music.
#29
Quote by darkstar2466
Living a 'happy life' climbing the bureaucratic ladder is one of the saddest things I can think of. But yeah, this definitely deserves its own thread of discussion.


That is actually relevant to this thread.

Happiness is not some standardized feeling which is probably part of the issue OP is facing.

Applying someone else standards to your own life is a recipe for failure.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
#30
If you start learning and absorbing now about computer technology for audio, publishing and administration, business relations and networking, and the core of music such as orchestration/arranging, tonal theory,


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