#1
I know that this is likely an insultingly easy question, but it's something that vexes me pretty badly.

My theoretical knowledge of modes, chords, etc. is very solid, but my application doesn't seem to reflect the theory. Say if I wanted to created a song with a very light and warm feeling, it's my understanding that this feeling, aside from the obvious working around modes in the major family, comes from which notes you play on the accented beats.

That obviously comes to sound boring after awhile, so I tend to drift off and land on some of the more tonally distance notes, but thus lose the tonal integrity of what I was aiming for.

Am I missing something regarding the relationship between note choice and beat accents? Is that generally what governs a particular feel, or am I horribly misled?

Thanks for any help.
#2
I think the problem lies with having an idea in you head, and knowing how to get the music in your head out onto the guitar.
This can be improved by improving your ear. With a strong sense of relative pitch (and if your lucky, perfect pitch) you be able to take any song that you hear in your head and play it out on your instrument. Then you can create any feelings you want
#3
Sounds to me that the thing your missing is chords.

Harmony trumps melody in modern music
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Quote by vermanubis
I know that this is likely an insultingly easy question, but it's something that vexes me pretty badly.

My theoretical knowledge of modes, chords, etc. is very solid, but my application doesn't seem to reflect the theory. Say if I wanted to created a song with a very light and warm feeling, it's my understanding that this feeling, aside from the obvious working around modes in the major family, comes from which notes you play on the accented beats.

That obviously comes to sound boring after awhile, so I tend to drift off and land on some of the more tonally distance notes, but thus lose the tonal integrity of what I was aiming for.

Am I missing something regarding the relationship between note choice and beat accents? Is that generally what governs a particular feel, or am I horribly misled?

Thanks for any help.


There's more to obtaining a certain feel than note choice and accents. Tempo, orchestration and tone also play a part.

You mentioned "a very light and warm feeling". Try listening to "The Morning Fog" by Kate Bush. We have :-

Clean tone on the classical guitar
Brisk tempo
Arpeggios, no dense harmony
Mostly major chords
#5
Quote by vermanubis
I know that this is likely an insultingly easy question, but it's something that vexes me pretty badly.

My theoretical knowledge of modes, chords, etc. is very solid, but my application doesn't seem to reflect the theory. Say if I wanted to created a song with a very light and warm feeling, it's my understanding that this feeling, aside from the obvious working around modes in the major family, comes from which notes you play on the accented beats.

That obviously comes to sound boring after awhile, so I tend to drift off and land on some of the more tonally distance notes, but thus lose the tonal integrity of what I was aiming for.

Am I missing something regarding the relationship between note choice and beat accents? Is that generally what governs a particular feel, or am I horribly misled?

Thanks for any help.


How do you maintain tonal integrity in general? Cadences, intelligent voice leading, and preventing your "harmony"(used loosely here to define the interplay of your melody and the attending background) from being Hijacked to a Major or Minor resolution. For this reason, modes tend towards simple vamps.

Best,

Sean