#1
I just softly used 1000 grit sandpaper with a little bit of water and sanded a very very small area (around the underneath part of fret 7-8 on the back of my poly maple fretboard), I did it extremely careful and slowly going in the motion from left to right (or should I go in circular motion?). Making sure I'm not pressing down to hard with too much preasure and taking too much finish off. Now, I compare the whole fretboard to the little part I sanded at the buttom of the neck, I must say, it definately felt much much more comfortable and smooth for me. I tried using my left hand sliding up and down the fretboard, and everytime I get to the sanded part, it just felt so much better with great playability. I didn't even have to sand down too much to get it smooth enough for me to play, and even the gloss seems to decreased by only a bit but it's still there, also the color changed by a tiny bit of more whilte, but really, I look at the part where I sanded then look at the whole fretboard, I can barely tell any difference in terms of look, but plays much much more comfortable. Better than I expected. At least my easily sweaty hands barely gets stuck now at the part where I sanded. I was thinking maybe I could just repeat what I did to that tiny part of the fretboard to the whole fretboard extremely slow and careful? Might take me some time, but I'm willing to spend all the time in the world and do it slow and safe since I have no experience. And I thought as long as I go slow and very carefully, it might be better to do it myself instead of taking it to a pro tech, because even though know the right way of getting the job done, but they don't know how smooth I personally want, they could go too far with sanding when it could have already been smooth to me. If I do it myself, I can sand a little, try playing, then sand more if needed. Question is, is there anything else I need to do after the process of sanding? do I need to add-in any product/spray afterwards? Because I heard a sanded poly maple neck can get dirty and becomes black extremely fast and easily? My apologize for the long respond. But I was surprised it worked out really really well in terms of playability and the appearance change is even barely noticable! (well, if I've sanded a bit more it might be, but I only sanded a tiny little bit and somehow it's smooth enough to get me playing just fine.) what do you think.. In the case, should I do the same thing to the whole back part of the poly maple fretboard? at least this way the smoothness is permanent / last longer. CHEERS : )
#4
Sand the whole of the back of the neck.
For the fretboard itself, you can sand it if you really want to but I've never seen the point Your fingers shouldn't really be touching the fretboard anyway so it won't make much difference there.

And don't use water. Using wet & dry paper is great for bringing out a smooth finish, but what you're trying to do is sand the finish off, not get a professional gloss. Just use the paper dry, it'll work quicker. Water has no business being any where near a sanded neck.

And please, please, stick to one thread. This is the third or fourth thread you've made about the subject now. It is much easier for both you and everyone else if you keep everything in one thread.
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#5
Your multiple threads are getting very annoying and I'm surprised they haven't been closed yet.

Are you talking about the fretboard, or the neck itself?

FRETBOARD --> <-- NECK


Fretboard - Don't sand the fretboard, that's just pointless. You shouldn't be really touching it anyways when you play, so the feel of the fretboard doesn't matter.

Neck - Ditch the water, just use dry paper. You're using a finishing grade paper, 1000 grit will take a good while of rapid sanding before you'll notice any significant difference (pitting, dips, etc). Put some elbow grease into and sand the entire NECK surface in the direction of the grain. In other words, up and down the length of the NECK. You could sand nonstop for 2 hours straight with all the force and speed you could physically muster and not notice a major difference in terms of pitting/dips/etc. I'd recommend stepping up to a coarser grit like 400 or 600.

Sand your neck to comfort, quit making new threads about this exact subject, and you better post result pictures after the multiple threads on this subject.
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[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#6
For the love of God...



https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1516617
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1515858
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1513722
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1516104
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1513029

Please use one of these other five threads that you've started regarding this issue. I've even linked them for your convenience. This forum is not your personal blog, if you want to tell the rest of the forum about the giant epiphany that you have had upon listening to the advice that you have been soliciting and ignoring for weeks now, then at least do it in one of the other five threads that you have started on this topic.

Also, since you make no attempt at subtlety, you should probably be aware that the mods on this site are heavy handed when it comes to handing out bans for having multiple usernames. And yes, they have their ways of checking.
Last edited by al112987 at Feb 3, 2012,
#7
So after I sand the guitar neck can I use Lemon oil instead of Tung Oil? or what do I need to use to make sure a sanded neck doesn't turn dark and gets dirty easily? I want my maple to age well and turn yellowish overtime not gray...
#9
this reminds me of how life was like before google
.
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#10
perhaps a car polisher would work better than tung oil in terms of keeping the sanded neck from getting dirty and turning gray easily? is there a specific car polisher brand that's safe and you would suggest for guitar maple neck? or any car polisher would be fine? and I was wondering, if we use a car polisher, isn't it going to be less smooth again? or not...

also since I'm just sanding a little tiny bit with 1000/2000 grit, not all the way down, ppl said it's going to be a "matt" finish (I don't know what exactly that means by "matt" finish), and in this case, they say it doesn't require any polish or spray and the guitar won't get dirty or gray easily, they say just use a cotton rag and wipe it then it would be fine?
#11
the answer to your question is 62
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#12
Do people see one person on the net with a sticky neck and then decide theirs is too?
Lots of these threads popping up lately.

Dude, if you sanded it and it feels nice but doesn't look crap, what's the problem? Sand the rest of it
#13
Right. You've been told this by several people over the course of your last five threads. I'm going to repeat this one last time. For the love of everything that is sacred, pay attention:

Do not use water, polishes, oils, or any other substances on a sanded maple neck.

Do not use lemon oil on a maple neck of any kind, ever. Do not use water. Do not use finish polishes. Do not use wood polishes. Do not use sanding sealer. Do not use car polishes. Do not use window polish. Do not use lighter fluid. Do not use baby powder. Do not use moisturiser. Do not use string cleaner. Do not use fretboard conditioner. Do not use tung oil, that's just another type of finish and will make sanding the neck pointless as you'll just be right back where you started.

This is all you do to a sanded maple neck: you sand it. That is it. Just that. Nothing else, ever. You sand the original finish down once and then you're done. There is nothing you need to do to take care of it. There is nothing you can do to take care of it. Maple of any kind will darken and age in time, but you are talking about thirty years or more. You can't make it look more aged quicker unless you refinish it with a darker finish.

You can't sand a finish down and have it still look glossy (shiny). It's that gloss that makes it feel ''sticky'' in the first place, so sanding it and then making it glossy again is just a waste of time. ''Matte'' means it is non-glossy, not shiny. This is also sometimes referred to as ''satin''. If you sand a maple neck down it will always look ''matte''.

This is really the simplest, most basic thing you can do to a guitar. There is no reason to have five threads and so much confusion over this. You just take some sandpaper, sand the finish down and you're done. Simple as that. End of.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
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#14
Quote by al112987
For the love of God...



https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1516617
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1515858
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1513722
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1516104
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1513029

Please use one of these other five threads that you've started regarding this issue. I've even linked them for your convenience. This forum is not your personal blog, if you want to tell the rest of the forum about the giant epiphany that you have had upon listening to the advice that you have been soliciting and ignoring for weeks now, then at least do it in one of the other five threads that you have started on this topic.

Also, since you make no attempt at subtlety, you should probably be aware that the mods on this site are heavy handed when it comes to handing out bans for having multiple usernames. And yes, they have their ways of checking.

i just read your post
Actually called Mark!

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#15
Quote by 1877
So after I sand the guitar neck can I use Lemon oil instead of Tung Oil? or what do I need to use to make sure a sanded neck doesn't turn dark and gets dirty easily? I want my maple to age well and turn yellowish overtime not gray...



Your guitar is not going to age and turn yellow. Maple does not turn yellowish over time. The finish is what turns yellow. A poly finish is not going to age. The reason why there is an amber color in the finish right now is because Fender shoots it with amber tinted clear coat. The old Fender necks turn amber because the nitro clear coat on them yellows with exposure to air, UV and smoke. This is a quality of a NITRO finished guitar.

Second of all, what in the world are you trying to accomplish with Lemon oil? How many times do people on this site need to tell you not to use lemon oil. Throw the lemon oil away, you don't need it so stop asking questions about it. Lemon oil is not a varnish. Do nothing, sand the neck, if you really want, you can wipe down with naphtha to clean off all the dust, and that's it. Don't do anything more. Don't put lemon oil on it, and don't put tung oil on it. Tung oil is a finish that is supposed to penetrate the wood. You have a poly finish in the wood, the tung oil is just going to sit on top of it. If you want to finsih your neck in tung oil (which is not pure tung oil, it's a polymerizing varnish that contains tung oil), then you need to sand ALL the finish off down to raw wood. It's not a polish. For your guitar, it's not going to do anything but make a mess. You don't polish a satin neck anyway, you don't want it to be glossy. For some reason, you cannot seem to put it together that the glossiness and shininess is what makes the neck sticky in the first place.

Now, I know you didn't read what I just posted, because I don't know how many times people need to tell you this. Get rid of the lemon oil. It's not going to do anything.
#16
Quote by 1877
So after I sand the guitar neck can I use Lemon oil instead of Tung Oil? or what do I need to use to make sure a sanded neck doesn't turn dark and gets dirty easily? I want my maple to age well and turn yellowish overtime not gray...

Calm down, you're wayyyy overthinking a very simple, elementary process.

-Don't use lemon oil, its not meant to be used on a neck and wouldn't do anything except make everything sloppy/messy.

-Tung Oil is a finish, applying a finish over your sanded neck defeats the purpose of you sanding it to begin with. Don't use Tung Oil.

-A finish comes in three styles: Gloss, Satin (matte), or Flat. If you sand a gloss finish it becomes matte, so it doesn't reflect light like a gloss finish.

-The neck will still have a finish on it, all you are doing is scuffing the suface of it to feel smoother to the touch. so it will not turn gray and get dirty like you're thinking. If it were a raw maple neck (like the Fender Custom Shop bass sitting next to me) it would turn gray and get dirty like you're thinking (like the bass currently is).

-If you wish to clean your matte/satin neck get a cloth damp with a product called "Naphtha". Its literally lighter fluid and evaporates quickly leaving a dry surface.


I'm going to outline the process of sanding the neck for you. This is exactly the method I would do and recommend to anyone, and the method that anyone with common sense would tell you how to do it. If this is too difficult for you to do and you live nearby, I will do this for you in 10 minutes for only $20.

1: Take a piece of DRY sandpaper (preferably 600-800 grit, 1000 will take a lot longer) and place it in your hand.

2: With this sandpaper in your hand, rub the living shit outta the neck along of the length of it with some force. Go as fast as you want, the faster you do the less time you'll feel like you're beating off a guitar. Rub until your arm feels like rubber, then rub some more. Stop once in while (after a minute or two) and blow on the paper to get the dust outta it. Then keep rubbing.

3: Rub it down with a Naphtha-damp cloth. This will remove the loose particles of finish that came off the neck from sanding.

4: You're done, forever! Play the guitar, and play it some more. Your neck is complete and you'll never have to worry about it ever again.

Tip: With 1000 grit paper you will never ever sand through your finish to bare wood, it's practically impossible even with a powered sander. Don't worry about taking your time and going easy as possible, there's no point.
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
Last edited by Flux'D at Feb 3, 2012,