#1
Hi everyone

For a while now I've found myself at a weird point. All the songs I find are either way too easy or way too hard. Or someitmes it happens in a song, like I can play the whole rhythm but am hopeless for the solo.

Like, for the past few days I've been working an "easyish solo", Eagleheart, by Stratovarius. I can play it perfectly at 75% speed, but am a complete mess at 100%

And almost every time, be it solo or rhythm, the problem seems to lie in my right hand, I just can't pick fast enough.

Suggestions on how I should approach this?

Thanks!!
#2
Work on your picking technique with a metronome.
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#3
Work on excerpts from too technical songs.
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#4
You're already on the right track. Keep learning solos that you want to play at the speed at which you're capable of playing them well. Then, slowly, (using a metronome) build up those speeds. You've listed a jump from 75% to 100%; that's no good! Increase it in very small increments and steadily push your limits.
It's also a good idea to take it down past your max speed (e.g. for the Stratovarius solo, 60% speed) and then slowly build it up to your max and then (still slowly) as far past your max as you can, whilst maintaining comfort and relaxation.
If you notice any problem sections in the solos, isolate them and slowly build them up.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
Last edited by Aleksi at Feb 3, 2012,
#5
Quote by Rainmaker31
Hi everyone

For a while now I've found myself at a weird point. All the songs I find are either way too easy or way too hard. Or someitmes it happens in a song, like I can play the whole rhythm but am hopeless for the solo.

Like, for the past few days I've been working an "easyish solo", Eagleheart, by Stratovarius. I can play it perfectly at 75% speed, but am a complete mess at 100%

And almost every time, be it solo or rhythm, the problem seems to lie in my right hand, I just can't pick fast enough.

Suggestions on how I should approach this?

Thanks!!


What you need to do is not, in fact, make yourself play faster; you need to make yourself play better. Slow right down and make sure you're practicing with perfect technique as much of the time as possible and you'll improve enough to get the speed in time.

Also if you're stuck at a point where you're good enough for some things but can't do others then the best solution is to write your own material that's just on the limit of what you can do so it pushes you more than other people's stuff.
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#6
Also if you're stuck at a point where you're good enough for some things but can't do others then the best solution is to write your own material that's just on the limit of what you can do so it pushes you more than other people's stuff


Bingo.

Or just listen to more music until you find the stuff at the right difficulty level.
#7
Increasing speed in small increments is the way to go in like 90% of the time but I use different possibilities too.

The first would be playing up in tempo but only a very short passage, expanding one note at a time.

The second would be looping a sequence up in tempo or at least faster than you can already handle, although sloppy in the beginning. Concentrate on playing different notes or changes of notes of the sequence very accurate, thus cleaning the whole passage up.

I use those techniques mostly for arpeggios, alternate picked, sweeped or tapped. Of course I use the speed increasing tool here mainly too.
#8
Thanks for the responses guys!

@Xter
Any suggestions?

@Aleksi
How could I do this in GuitarPro? Altering the actual tempo instead of just using the modifiers maybe? This may sound noobish, but might playing at like 80 or 90% speed "confuse me" rhymthm-wise, the numbers not being as "round"?

@Zaphod_Beeblebr/Freepower
I appreciate your suggestion, but I'm really far from being able to write anything haha, I'd consider myself a begginner to intermediate player. Think it's still worth a try? Even if it's just sweeping some pentatonic stuff?

Also, Freepower, would working on stuff such as your youtube lessons be a good idea at this point? (While I'm here, let me take the time to thank you, your channel is awesome! I've tried some of your lessons, I'm not sure how well I'm doing though haha)
#9
Quote by Rainmaker31
@Aleksi
How could I do this in GuitarPro? Altering the actual tempo instead of just using the modifiers maybe? This may sound noobish, but might playing at like 80 or 90% speed "confuse me" rhymthm-wise, the numbers not being as "round"?

In Guitar Pro, you can alter the tempo or use the "loop" function and set the values to e.g. 80% to 80% and increase it slowly e.g. to 82% to 82%.
I'm really not sure what you mean by making the numbers less "round"; you should be able to change the tempo of anything you can play, without getting lost.

Also, since you went straight to Guitar Pro, I'm assuming you don't use a metronome? If this is the case, I strongly advise learning to use one. Guitar Pro may be easier to follow but those who use it as a speed trainer often end up with trouble subdividing the beat.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#10
@Zaphod_Beeblebr/Freepower
I appreciate your suggestion, but I'm really far from being able to write anything haha, I'd consider myself a begginner to intermediate player. Think it's still worth a try? Even if it's just sweeping some pentatonic stuff?


Then perhaps you should be learning to write stuff instead of just covering blazing solos?

Yeah, it's definitely worth a try - writing music is fun. You can look at your favourite artists and try and steal their ideas for your technique practice.

Also, Freepower, would working on stuff such as your youtube lessons be a good idea at this point? (While I'm here, let me take the time to thank you, your channel is awesome! I've tried some of your lessons, I'm not sure how well I'm doing though haha)


Some of the lessons will be relevant - the unwanted noise one and the finger independence one are always going to be useful to work on. So, if you don't already do that, you really have to start!

The "exercises of doom" are kinda short post-warmup things that are useful for very specific things. I wouldn't practice more than one or two of them and I wouldn't do more than half an hour total, but doing 10 mins a day of them would probably be good for your technique and fun.