#1
I think I might have damaged my wrist from playing incorrectly. I played with my wrist too bent for quite a while, so songs like In Bloom would hurt a lot after I was done since reaching for those power chords was quite a task. Now, when I try to bend a note or something, I sometimes get a sharp pain if I do it incorrectly.

Are there any in-depth videos or something that show how to position your fretting hand? All I ever find is "this is the classical position, this is casual, blah blah," nothing helpful. It's hard when you're teaching yourself and don't know how to fix a bad habit. I just don't know what to do with my thumb when I'm playing, it's seems like it's always there to bother me.
#2
The correct way is what ever feels comfortable to you. I like to keep my thumb either perched over the top of the neck or resting in the middle if I need to do some wide stretches, and I keep my wrist at a slightly bent angle when I can, but If im playing a fast section with some wide stretches I usually bend it to a 90 degree angle. This has worked good for me so far, I hope this helps.
#6
Quote by jkielq91
Could it possible just be a badly set up guitar?

That was a problem for me in the early days.


How does a badly set up guitar have any influence on your technique?
besides being able to blame external factors for your bad technique ?
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Last edited by Slashiepie at Feb 4, 2012,
#7
If it hurts(and not because of a lack of stamina or some other thing like that) stop doing it because you're going to mess your body up.
Your neck might not be the right size for you, You might need to change the angle of your guitar a bit.
For some reason after I was playing for a little while one day, my wrist started hurting really bad after every time I played. I changed my strap(same brand and material just different color) and changed the height of my guitar and it doesn't happen anymore unless I'm sitting down.
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#8
Quote by Slashiepie
How does a badly set up guitar have any influence on your technique?
besides being able to blame external factors for your bad technique ?


The setup has a shit-load to do with your technique. If you've got sky-high action with .16 gauge strings, your not going to be getting Guthrie Govan bends and Holdsworth legato runs as easily as you would on even a moderately well-setup guitar.
#9
Quote by WalkinDude91
The setup has a shit-load to do with your technique. If you've got sky-high action with .16 gauge strings, your not going to be getting Guthrie Govan bends and Holdsworth legato runs as easily as you would on even a moderately well-setup guitar.


So ?
How does it screw up your technique?
If you have good technique you will have good technique with high or low action.
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#10
If you've got sky-high action with .16 gauge strings, your not going to be getting Guthrie Govan bends and Holdsworth legato runs as easily as you would on even a moderately well-setup guitar.


Well-setup doesn't necessarily mean "as easy to play as physically possible".
#11
Quote by Slashiepie
How does a badly set up guitar have any influence on your technique?
besides being able to blame external factors for your bad technique ?


With me the strings were to far from the fretboard and it far to much effort and strength to fret the strings, causing discomfort.

And if the strings are to thick or heavy for you it can cause issues to. When I first got my Jackson it had heavy Fender strings on it and it made me bleed under the skin. But with Ernie Ball or D'Addario strings, and no change to the action, I had no such problems.

Other things that could cause issue are poorly put in or badly worn fret wires.
Last edited by jkielq91 at Feb 5, 2012,
#12
Quote by Freepower
Well-setup doesn't necessarily mean "as easy to play as physically possible".


It's certainly a part of it though. And if you're still developing your technique, you don't need the extra challenge of having a ridiculously challenging setup on your guitar. Another setup issue worth mentioning: have you ever tried bending on a guitar with very worn frets? It can be about five times harder to bend on that crap. So, if you haven't developed the muscles in your hand and your exerting a much higher level of strength just to get a single bend out, how is it implausible that you could injure yourself?
#13
Unless the neck is deformed laterally or vertically, or the frets are covered in fresh blood from an aids infected person, the technique totally stays the same.

None of that shite has any influence on wrist angle,finger curvature, anchoring the right hand or pick holding.. the tension on the body the thumb placement or other bad habits of that sort are not guitar dependant.
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Last edited by Slashiepie at Feb 5, 2012,
#14
Quote by Slashiepie
So ?
How does it screw up your technique?
If you have good technique you will have good technique with high or low action.


Can you play every single lick or riff you know just as fluidly and cleanly as you can on an acoustic? Don't forget any kind of tapping lick or giant stretchy legato licks OR anything involving bending. The setup of a guitar DOES change what is immediately comfortable for you. Why do you think so many guitarists hire guitar techs to follow them around? I do want to clarify that I'm not talking exclusively about action and string gauge. I've played guitars with moderate action and .11s that were super easy to play (Suhr guitars are awesome). Fret wear, string tension, intonation, etc. That can also affect your playing to a certain degree. I just hate the mentality of "just ingore the fact that your instrument sucks: just get better".
#15
Quote by Slashiepie
Unless the neck is deformed laterally or vertically, or the frets are covered in fresh blood from an aids infected person, the technique totally stays the same.

None of that shite has any influence on wrist angle,finger curvature, anchoring the right hand or pick holding.. the tension on the body the thumb placement or other bad habits of that sort are not guitar dependant.


I disagree. I think that there can be a lot more tension in your hands from having to press down harder AND it can affect certain licks unless you are at Guthrie Govan's level. Even then, he still has his guitars occasionally setup for low action.