#1
Hi,

I've decided to pursue the RGT Grades in Electric guitar, and as I've been playing a while, I've decided to start at Grade 2.

Part of this involves the playing of a number of chord progressions using strumming patterns of my choice whihc are appropriate for the piece.

What I'm struggling with is making practising this interesting. I have the supplementary rhythm guitar manual which has 10 different pieces to practice in either 4/4 or 3/4 time.

At the moment, I'm just playing each piece using different strumming patterns to see what sounds right, but this gets a bit dull after a while, and also, I'm a bit concerned that when I take the exam, I don't have a way to choose the right strumming pattern that sounds right without trial and error, which won't be allowed.

So, summary, how I can make practising rhythm guitar fun and interesting ?

Thanks

Lee
#4
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Why would you practise rhythm guitar, it doesn't even matter.


It doesn't matter to you because you don't play guitar. Fair enough.

For guitarists though, it's kinda important to get that shiz down.

Anywayz, I'll assume you were joking.
#5
"i would like to practice graded music with no sustenance for the sake of grinding habit into my fingers and have been following the rule book on how to do it rigidly

how do i make this fun guys"
modes are a social construct
#6
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Why would you practise rhythm guitar, it doesn't even matter.



trololololol XD
Quote by Hail
i'm the internet equivalent of ripping the skin off my face and strangling you with it right now


Quote by Steve Albini
Remixing is for talentless pussies who don't know how to tune a drum or point a microphone.
#10
Quote by Hail
"i would like to practice graded music with no sustenance for the sake of grinding habit into my fingers and have been following the rule book on how to do it rigidly

how do i make this fun guys"
Sing along with it! Preferably way off key.....
#11
Hey, I'm a RGT tutor. ^_^

Quote by lee_d_m
At the moment, I'm just playing each piece using different strumming patterns to see what sounds right, but this gets a bit dull after a while, and also, I'm a bit concerned that when I take the exam, I don't have a way to choose the right strumming pattern that sounds right without trial and error, which won't be allowed.

So, summary, how I can make practising rhythm guitar fun and interesting ?

Thanks

Lee


Well, there's really two questions there. First off, it's good to have a solid fallback strumming pattern for each time signature - this way if you blank at the exam, you have something totally solid that works every time.

For 4/4 I recommend 1 2 3+4+
For 3/4 I recommend 1 2+3+

Both quite easy and can fit a variety of styles.

Regarding keeping it interesting - you don't necessarily just have to practice the chord charts to practice your rhythm guitar. For example, Sweet Child O Mine has lots of the chords that come up in the early grades, and a fairly simple strumming pattern - however it's a nice way to put your chord knowledge to use.

Anything that uses the chords you've learnt and helps you develop your strumming and timing will be good - most pop tunes for example, will use a variety of chords at approximately grade 2 level.

Good luck in your exam!
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Why would you practise rhythm guitar, it doesn't even matter.


Quote by Sean0913
Oh! Man. Look What I've Started! Next All The Haters Are Gonna Be Posting Full On Completely Incredibly Ignorant Replies Much Like This onE buT thE biG differencE iS theY wilL CaPiTaLiZe ThE FiRsT LeTtEr To EvErY drow dna neht llyaer things up mess!

Sean,

Best


Quote by Hail
"i would like to practice graded music with no sustenance for the sake of grinding habit into my fingers and have been following the rule book on how to do it rigidly

how do i make this fun guys"


I get that you guys are letting off steam, but please, OP has a totally reasonable question and you're acting like dicks.

trolling useless lazy posters = funny
trolling legit threads =

And Hail... totally wrong about this particular grade system.
#12
Wow you guys were being dicks to TS. Let's just troll mode threads, mkay?

TS, try learning songs that incoporate that or make something up of your own that invovles what is in the book. I remember jamming with basic power chords to a drum machine. I played it in 4/4 and every 1 & 3 beat I'd play a new chord. Man, what fun!

Remember, it's all about timing!

Cheers,
Xter
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#13
Quote by Freepower

I get that you guys are letting off steam, but please, OP has a totally reasonable question and you're acting like dicks.

trolling useless lazy posters = funny
trolling legit threads =

#16
Quote by lee_d_m

What I'm struggling with is making practising this interesting. I have the supplementary rhythm guitar manual which has 10 different pieces to practice in either 4/4 or 3/4 time.

At the moment, I'm just playing each piece using different strumming patterns to see what sounds right, but this gets a bit dull after a while, and also, I'm a bit concerned that when I take the exam, I don't have a way to choose the right strumming pattern that sounds right without trial and error, which won't be allowed.

So, summary, how I can make practising rhythm guitar fun and interesting ?

Thanks

Lee
Back in the day, rock was more rhythm driven than today. Clever rhythm guitar work abounded, and it was more or less the "lead" guitar. Early Stones, early Beatles, and especially early Who, all prime examples.

The Stone's "Beggars Banquet" showcases Keith Richards ability to develop an infectious rhythm. And the obvious, "Tommy" by The Who, is an intensive, all hands on deck , crash course in all you ever wanted to know about rhythm guitar. I'm sure the tabs are here at UG to speed you through learning the chord changes.

If all else fails, you can use the timing pattern of the melody, and adapt the rhythm stroking to that
#17
Jeeez I'z sloooow on that one. Need sleeeepz, like, proper...
#18
Quote by Freepower

And Hail... totally wrong about this particular grade system.


oh, i know, the OP just looked so depressing to me i had to point it out.

if i had to practice strumming patterns, i'd just learn simple songs you know and how to count/"feel" the time signatures as you strum along. practical application in a "real world" environment is a lot more encouraging than fiddling with practice sheets.
modes are a social construct
Last edited by Hail at Feb 4, 2012,