#1
I've been playing guitar for around 4 years now and during this time I've come to learn a lot about guitar's, effects, amps, and what not but over the years the one thing I haven't been able to really get a hold on is guitar tone. Right now I play an old school schecter strat type thing with single coils through a Vox15 Valve Reactor and I have a boss me-70 multi effects pedal, but i can't seem to figure out how to get the right tone. I taught myself how to play so I've never really had anyone who could show me how to even set up my bass mid and treble settings. Right now I just use the pre amp on my pedal for the bass mid and treble settings and I have them all set around 50ish with the treb and bass on my amp turned up about a quarter of the way. It's hard to describe but my tone just doesn't sound full enough or balanced enough and it's time I figure this out.

1)First of all what are standard settings for bass mid treble?
2)Should I be relying mostly on my pedal for the pre amp and guitar settings?
What's the benefit of having the straight up pedal instead of a multi effects pedal? 3)Because I notice that not many professionals have multi effect pedals.
And any other information you'd like to share would be welcome too it seems like I have a lot to learn.
#2
1) There absolutely aren't any.
2) Generally, it's best to get as much as possible from the amp and then add pedals after.
3) Individual pedals are generally considered to sound better, but a decent multi fx will sound better that a load of cheap pedals
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#3
1) It's really wherever you want to put them. On guitar I use about 70% bass, 45% mids, and 50% treble. But really it's what you want. Mids are where the bite and fullness or your tone come from so spend a lot of time playing around with them.
2) If you like the way the preamp sounds then go for it.
Multi-effects are digital and they use computers to alter the sound to the way it's supposed to be. Analog pedals, on the other hand, alter the sound with the path of the signal and their circuitry within them. Most guitarists prefer the tone of analog pedals to digital and that's why you see effects pedals instead of multi-effects.

Mainly it's just whatever you want to do. It's your tone, do what you want with it.
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#4
Well thank you ^ thats the type of answers I was looking for
Last edited by zchavez09 at Feb 4, 2012,
#5
I have a Boss ME-70, and I would strongly advise against using the preamp section at all, and avoid the distortion too, if you can help it. Sounds like you need to get yourself some new gear. However you set the eq, it's hard to make a great amp sound bad. We can't give you eq settings though, you have to set it up to the tone you want by ear. Turn each control all the way up and down individually to get a feel for what they do.
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#7
Quote by Any7423
I have a Boss ME-70, and I would strongly advise against using the preamp section at all, and avoid the distortion too, if you can help it. Sounds like you need to get yourself some new gear. However you set the eq, it's hard to make a great amp sound bad. We can't give you eq settings though, you have to set it up to the tone you want by ear. Turn each control all the way up and down individually to get a feel for what they do.



New gear couldn't hurt either but what you have is fine if you are just practicing in your bedroom. Just keep playing around with everything.
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
#8
Quote by Rebel Scum

Thank. You.

And actually, I'm starting to have shows lining up for my band so I need to get this tone thing figured out. I took the advice of not using the pre amp section and that was my first step in the right direction
If i start to get into buying pedals what are some essential pedals I should be looking at? I actually was browsing through that thread and saw that one of my favorite bands uses the jerkyll and hyde od and dist does anyone have any feedback on that pedal?
Last edited by zchavez09 at Feb 4, 2012,
#9
Quote by zchavez09
Thank. You.

And actually, I'm starting to have shows lining up for my band so I need to get this tone thing figured out. I took the advice of not using the pre amp section and that was my first step in the right direction
If i start to get into buying pedals what are some essential pedals I should be looking at? I actually was browsing through that thread and saw that one of my favorite bands uses the jerkyll and hyde od and dist does anyone have any feedback on that pedal?

If your gonna be gigging, you will definitely need a bigger amp, yours just won't have the power. What kinda music do you play?
"We're content, to pitch our tent,
When the glory's evident"
Petra - Beyond Belief.
#10
Gigging? Yeah, you might want to figure out tone. But it is all preference, so that makes it hard to explain. When I try out amps i usually set all the EQ to 12 oclock. Then slowly (take as much time as you need) tweak each individual EQ to what you like. I forgot to mention, remove all effects before hand. Also, if your practicing with that amp with a drummer and it sounds how you want, you dont NEED a bigger amp. Most gigs can mic your amp, but you might want to find out ahead of time.
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#11
Everyone will probably disagree, and this might not be everyone's opinion, but if you have your amp settings at reasonable positions (not mids scooped to 0 or something stupid) then it's more the amp or you that doesn't sound good.

Also, if you're using the multi effects pedal for distortion that's the quickest way to kill your tone. My friend tried to use his pedals' distortion through a 5150/Orange stack (a dream setup) and even got that to sound bad.

So you MIGHT want to at least visit guitar center and try out some different amps. And maybe try a guitar with humbuckers. You might like that better
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#12
Did not read through the thread.

Tone-hunting should be based on one simple rule; keep it as simple as possible. Get the best tone you can with as little additions to your signal chain as you can, and it'll just be plain better in almost every situation.

Start by ditching everything between your guitar and your amp. Guitar straight in to it's input, nothing else. Set everything (except volume) to noon, volume appropriately dialled in. Play it for a bit. Fiddle with the guitar's controls. Work out what needs improving, and tweak the EQ / gain from there.
#13
Little point using a multi FX with your amp, it's simply not going to do anything that the amp can't already do better and most of the time it's just going to interere with what the amp's trying to do.

Dittch the multi FX for the time being and figure out which amp model/ models you like best on the amp, then figure out the best way to EQ them. At the moment you're overcomplicating the issue horribly. Don't worry about pedals at all for the time being, figure out how the amp works and work out which of the sounds it can produce suit you best.

One quick rule of thumb though, for a usable guitar tone your bass should nearly always be lower than mids and treble.
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