#1
Right now a band I drum for is recording two songs to enter an upcoming festival. I only joined the band like a week ago and they are all buddies and already pretty established, while I am totally new.

Anyway so also with this festival the recordings have to be basically live, meaning we can't do any post-editing, and we have to record the full song from start to finish.

Now the thing is that I am the drummer, and most recordings start with that, but I don't actually know the songs that well. Then I suggested them making a scratch guitar track, so they did, but I can't hear it clearly and I still don't really know when the song changes a lot of the time. We only have like a week until we have to submit the recordings. I am obviously being a problem unfortunately but I am the only drummer in the area. What do you suggest we/I do?

Edit: Also with the topic, we started the session with all of us practicing the songs a few times and then everyone was just sitting around while me or the guitarist worked on recording. When quiet hours came (I'm in Europe) we couldn't do any drums, so I suggested myself leaving and coming back. They insisted not to, so I didn't. It was a pretty big waste of time though it seemed. How should I avoid this?
Last edited by Tmusician at Feb 4, 2012,
#2
Get one of the guitarists to write the form out. That way you have a knowledge of the song's structure - make sure you keep looking at it, get it ingrained in your head. If you know what kind of feel or groove you want/need to play for each part of that, it might help to write down reminders (buzz-words that will trigger your memory).

Just stick that sheet by your feet when you're playing with them, as a reference, then you should be sorted.

Practice the song off that form on your own so you're confident playing without them - also, when you're playing with them, try and keep an ear out for identifiable parts of the song that will indicate a change (a particular lyric, lick, or what have you).

Hopefully then you should be ok with that - just feel it out from there! Get your groove on, so to speak :3
#3
Basically what he/(she?) said ^^

Get to know the different riffs or parts of the song and write them out.

i.e.: Riff 1 x4
Riff 2 x 2
#4
Umm....what are you doing in the band if you don't know the songs? I would have turned you away at the audition.

In this day and age, there's little excuse you can make for not recording. How many recording devices do you have right now? Computer? Phone? If you want to shell out a little cash a Zoom H2 will help you a lot (portable recording device, extremely popular).
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Yeah.

Why not get together and, I dunno, practice? And record the practice session so you can review it on your own.

If the band isn't willing to practice to help the new guy get up to speed, it's hard to know what to think about them.

As for the whole leaving the recording session because your part is done, that's a really bad way to feel like a part of the band. What you being there is saying is: "I'm one of you, I'm supporting what you're doing, I'm offering feedback, I'm part of this." What leaving because you can't drum is saying is, "I don't really care about what you guys do, I'm done, I'll be back later."

Especially given that you don't know the music very well, and aren't good friends with the guys yet, doesn't it make more sense for you to stick around, get to know the guys better, get to know the songs better, etc?

If you're not willing to do that, they're likely to start looking for another drummer pretty soon.
#6
Might be better to record a scratch song, aka record everyone just running through the song, pull out your drums and then re-record. I do this quite a bit with bands that can't stick to a click track. Makes them more comfortable recording to the song.
#7
Quote by Gerbs
Get one of the guitarists to write the form out. That way you have a knowledge of the song's structure - make sure you keep looking at it, get it ingrained in your head. If you know what kind of feel or groove you want/need to play for each part of that, it might help to write down reminders (buzz-words that will trigger your memory).

Just stick that sheet by your feet when you're playing with them, as a reference, then you should be sorted.

Practice the song off that form on your own so you're confident playing without them - also, when you're playing with them, try and keep an ear out for identifiable parts of the song that will indicate a change (a particular lyric, lick, or what have you).

Hopefully then you should be ok with that - just feel it out from there! Get your groove on, so to speak :3


Best post, the thread could have ended here. AlanHB, your post was so off... if you don't want to read the thread you don't have to respond.

Edit: Maybe I'll just do a quick explanation: I'm the only drummer in the area. These guys asked me to drum for them. They heard about me and saw me on Youtube. We only have had 2 sessions, the first one being mostly useless and the songs aren't songs I knew. Also the guys weren't really talking to me, they talked to each other and their native language is Greek which I don't know yet so I was already isolated.
Last edited by Tmusician at Feb 5, 2012,
#8
My post wasn't off at all dude. You're in a band, you don't know the songs. Pretty straightforward to me. If you were even learning the songs you'd have written the form down yourself already - it's pretty basic logic we're working with here.

But you have indicated that the guys don't even talk to you either, so it may just be that the band is really disorganised. It's hard to contemplate an established band which is disorganised but there you go.

So out of interest, what area has only one drummer? Sounds like a good place to get some work.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
I'm guessing this is some sort of metal or progressive band with a lot of intricate changes? At least I hope it is if it takes that long to learn the drums. Maybe just sit down with one of the established members and run through any problem areas you have so it's nailed into your head.

Oh and if you have a few days and they are willing, have them tab it out on guitar pro and listen to that junk nonstop
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#10
Quote by AlanHB
My post wasn't off at all dude. You're in a band, you don't know the songs. Pretty straightforward to me. If you were even learning the songs you'd have written the form down yourself already - it's pretty basic logic we're working with here.

But you have indicated that the guys don't even talk to you either, so it may just be that the band is really disorganised. It's hard to contemplate an established band which is disorganised but there you go.

So out of interest, what area has only one drummer? Sounds like a good place to get some work.


Why were you talking about H2 Zoom's???

Also it's of course not literally "one" drummer but there is an extreme scarcity of 14-18 year old drummers in the area, and one's who play rock especially.
#11
Quote by Tmusician
Why were you talking about H2 Zoom's???

Also it's of course not literally "one" drummer but there is an extreme scarcity of 14-18 year old drummers in the area, and one's who play rock especially.


So you can just easily record your song at practice. Your 14-18 obviously, and a bunch of kids who have probably never gone to a real studio and laid down a demo or anything for that matter. It takes some studio experience to go in and do that. That's why it's been suggested that you just record the song at practice.

And there really is no excuse for not knowing your parts or the structure. It takes 2 minutes to write down on a piece of paper.

Intro-build up, 2 measures.
Verse-12 measures
bridge to chorus, 1 measure
Chorus 6 measures.

You get the idea. And then you can at least count, your a drummer I hope you can count, where you are in the song and can at least jam with it.
#13
Quote by Tmusician
It wasn't at a studio, we record ourselves.


And you never said that, which is why your getting suggestions for the zoom, etc. And that's even less of an excuse for not having a recording done, meaning you could easily just record your practice and use those. Though I can see an issue with a bunch of kids trying to record a full song in anyway shape or form.

Your asking for advice, when it's you who don't know your parts, you have a way of recording and we gave you the answer of how to play to a song without knowing it with a song structure sheet.
#14
Quote by Tmusician
Why were you talking about H2 Zoom's???

Also it's of course not literally "one" drummer but there is an extreme scarcity of 14-18 year old drummers in the area, and one's who play rock especially.


Zoom H2 for recording. I've recorded demos of full bands with the Zoom before.

Which area is it that only has one drummer in you age group who plays rock drums?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#16
Quote by You Ruined It
Actually, my area has a dearth of high school age rock musicians in general...there's a metric crapload of guys who play acoustic guitars and sing stuff from "Youtube stars"


What's your area?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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