#1
I know you can train your ear to gain relative pitch, knowing intervals between pitches and the such, but can you train your ear to give yourself perfect pitch, naming a pitch (A, E, Gb, etc.) by ear without external reference?
#2
Yeah, It may take a loooooong time and repetition is a must. I was skeptical too and asked the same question. I can now sing a C in tune without reference and recognise it too in a melody. Its not much to brag about, but its possible.

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#3
Sure you may be able to learn it (I doubt that you can anyway), but it would take a long time and a lot of effort, but I think your energy is better spent training your relative pitch than trying to learn perfect pitch.
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#4
short answer: no

long answer: you can, but it's so much trouble it's not worth the effort unless you're born with it. after around 10 years old it's ridiculously hard to learn, and at that point you still need awesome relative pitch. who cares if you know what each note is if you can't tell intervals? and what about glissandos, microbends, etc.? they'll make you want to die.
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#5
You can learn tonal memory, but not perfect pitch. Most people who say they have perfect pitch just have a good sense of tonal memory.
#6
perfect pitch is a curse, you don't want it, i hate working with people who have it. you can however skill your relative pitch to a very high level, just do that
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#7
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I know you can train your ear to gain relative pitch, knowing intervals between pitches and the such, but can you train your ear to give yourself perfect pitch, naming a pitch (A, E, Gb, etc.) by ear without external reference?

well yes you can gain enough relative pitch to know if its an A or a G or whatever, but even that isnt actually perfect pitch. perfect pitch means that if those notes were even a fraction off, you would be able to tell that it wasn't quite an A.

personally, i dont think its worth trying to get it. it wont make you a better player in any sense or even a better composer. you might be able to compose in your head, but that doesnt mean it will actually BE any good.

but by all means, continue to train your ear.
#8
I have memorised various reference pitches, which isn't really difficult - just memorise the first note of songs you know well, and from there you can work out any pitch with good relative pitch. It's far from having perfect pitch though, being able to instantly recognise any note. I doubt you could learn that after the first few years of life, if at all.
#9
No, you cannot teach yourself perfect pitch.

You can, however, teach yourself how certain notes sound. I have a friend who can name any note you play as long as it's in tune. Once you get out of tune though he's useless there. He doesn't have perfect pitch, but he's close.
#10
You both can, and you cannot. It depends upon what extent you want for it.

At the moment, I feel that I am extremely close to being able to generate/recall all 7 tones of the C major scale. Therefore, assuming I get this down, I could recreate those tones vocally, and perhaps name individual tones in a scale/chord given enough time.

But accidentals, and being able to recall notes extremely quickly, is still very far away.

I may be able to find the tonic of a song, analyze that note, and realize that the song is in X Key, but analyzing the song by individual notes on the spot would be far too difficult.

It seems as though something inborn such as synesthesia might help though, as I have a friend who is synesthetic and he can tell me what notes are being played on the spot, and if they're in tune, because of the "Colors" they make.
Last edited by Life Is Brutal at Feb 6, 2012,