#1
so in the circle of 5ths.. all the flats and naturals are there.. how about forming sharp majors?

in C -> C#.. everything has an added sharp to it

but what about all the other scales?

Like D.. it'll have F## and C##?? D:
#4
@rockstar - but if you use those enharmonics then u cant write the scale officially

@supersac - yes i do mean D#, I know you can call it Eb, but I was wondering in instances where D# is really written
#5
Quote by luxeion
@rockstar - but if you use those enharmonics then u cant write the scale officially

@supersac - yes i do mean D#, I know you can call it Eb, but I was wondering in instances where D# is really written



oh well in that case...yeah you use F## and C## but there are few instances where youll see that
#6
Side note: F## and C## are written Fx and Cx
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#8
Side note: F## and C## are written Fx and Cx


Thanks, I just remembered they existed, I was really confused..

Quote by Matt.Guitar
Pretty pointless question - D# major would always be called Eb. I have never once seen a piece of music written in D#.
If you wrote a piece in D# I don't think you would be very popular with the w-winds and brass!
I don't think it's pointless. One of the pieces I came across a long time ago had a double sharp in it, but since I knew nothing of scales at that time, I thought it was stupid and it didn't strike my memory back until now.
#9
Double sharps are used to make music easier to read,

In a study for clarinet by Alfred Uhl the piece is in B major (5#'s), in one bar there is a G# followed by a G natural then another G#, so for ease of playing the G natural is shown as an F double sharp, this is because you only need to add a double sharp sign (x) instead of a natural sign and then 'resharpen' the G after. They are basically there so the music doesn't get to messy!
Last edited by geo1450 at Feb 6, 2012,
#10
Quote by luxeion
I don't think it's pointless. One of the pieces I came across a long time ago had a double sharp in it, but since I knew nothing of scales at that time, I thought it was stupid and it didn't strike my memory back until now.


in the key signature? highly doubt it...
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
in the key signature? highly doubt it...



It must have been in the piece he was playing, you can't get double sharps in a key signature, impossible.
#12
Quote by geo1450
It must have been in the piece he was playing, you can't get double sharps in a key signature, impossible.


See: Alkan
#13
Quote by geo1450
It must have been in the piece he was playing, you can't get double sharps in a key signature, impossible.


yeah, no. come on, you play clarinet. unless you're sticking to the one in Bb and ignoring the A, you should know how possible it is.

nice try, though.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#14
Ok, see what you mean, its not impossible, but you would use the enharmonic equivalent key signature instead of putting double sharps and flats in the key signature

For example something in Db minor would surely be written either in C# minor or with no key signature and lots of accidentals. Would you agree?
#15
Quote by geo1450
Ok, see what you mean, its not impossible, but you would use the enharmonic equivalent key signature instead of putting double sharps and flats in the key signature

For example something in Db minor would surely be written either in C# minor or with no key signature and lots of accidentals. Would you agree?


bingo. but it's extremely rare (and just plain retarded, in my opinion) to write any tonal piece with no key signature. so i don't agree with that.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#16
Enharmonically, the key signature which produces the least sharps or flats is always chosen as the standard, period.

The point is sort of moot, until you start writing out the score for a symphony, in which case it would be a blessing, writing in Db as opposed to C#.

On a more personal note, I love the key of C# sharpl. It's just so cute, with everything all sharped like that


Especially sweet is the irony of C natural becoming "B sharp" . And then there's the F natural being now called "E#". Good times, good times.

It simply doesn't work like that. And don't think I haven't tried to change people's minds about it myself either....

Quote by geo1450
For example something in Db minor would surely be written either in C# minor or with no key signature and lots of accidentals. Would you agree?

Well, no to that either C# minor shares its key signature with E major
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 6, 2012,