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#1
Guys dunno if this has been asked before, but Im a bit confused... What is the correct position of the G major chord?

Is it this one (I mostly used this):



Or this one (But my brother insist that this is the correct one):



Thanks...
#3
The G Major chord consist of the notes G, B and D arranged in triads, as usual. The 2nd string 3d fret is a D and the 2nd string open is a B and both notes are in the chord. So there is just a small difference since in the first case you'll have 2 D's and in the second 2 B's, so when you strum it it won't be noticeable. Important thing is - both versions are equally correct.
#4
It's both correct, since in the first: you play (6th - 1st string notes) G-B-D-G-B-G so it contains the three notes, G B and D -> G chord
second one you play: G-B-D-G-D-G also contains the three notes C B and D -> G chord.

Only different is that the first one contains 2 B's the second one 2 D's

hope you'll understand me...
#6
Either is fine. I used to use the first one, but recently decided I liked the sound of the second. It's all down to personal preference
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#7
Quote by Cold Reader
I was taught the first one but prefer the sound of the second so I always use that one now.

i agree with this completely

i learned the first one, but prefer the sound of the 2nd, plus it's actually easier for me to naturally do without thinking.
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#8
I've always preffered the second, but they're both correct.
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#9
G major has G, B and D, so both are correct.

First one: GBDGBG
Second one: GBDGDG

I prefer the second one.
#10
Yes Both are correct...

Coz...
A chord is made up of the 1st,3rd and 5th degree of any scale...for GMajor its G,B and D.
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#11
The second one feels more comfortable to me..

They're equally right.
#12
As said, both are equally correct - they're just different voicings of the same chord and it's up to you which chord you want to use when. I personally mostly use the second one, cuz that's the one I was taught from the beginning and find easiest to transit to/from etc.

But limiting yourself to only that version is stupid, however, so keep your horizon broadened
#13
Both are correct, just differant voices. If you listen to "Who'll Stop the Rain" you can hear them moving back and forth between the two forms. FWIW there are over 30 variants of the G-major chord scattered over the fretboard.
#14
I see, now I know that they are both correct. I thought the second one was a different chord or at least G but something different and not the Gmajor... Thanks alot guys...

In my case I'm kinda used to using the first one, though the only time I used the 2nd one is when Im playing time of your life by green day as the arpeggio sounds better with the 2nd one... I still only knew a few songs (and few w/ open chords) thats why I don't know much, the songs I like listening to are mostly powerchords... Dunno if it's ok for a beginner to jump immediately to powerchords without playing open chords that much but I guess this is a different question...

Thanks guys for answering my question...
#15
Quote by fr0z3n1337
Dunno if it's ok for a beginner to jump immediately to powerchords without playing open chords that much but I guess this is a different question...
Learn both. Power chords are cool but any guitarist should know open and bar chords too.
#17
Quote by fr0z3n1337
Dunno if it's ok for a beginner to jump immediately to powerchords without playing open chords that much but I guess this is a different question...


Power chords are much easier than the open chords. I started off with them, then learnt the open chords when I had a little more dexterity on my side.
#18
If you want to get technical, doubling the third isn't advised when playing or writing a chord. In this instance, I wouldn't say it really matters.
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#19
Power chords are nothing but the fifth and root, the optional octave is well.... optional.
The only difference between the two voicing is that the first one accentuates the third of G Maj, while the second accentuates the fifth, your D, both an octave higher.
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#20
Quote by fr0z3n1337
I see, now I know that they are both correct. I thought the second one was a different chord or at least G but something different and not the Gmajor... Thanks alot guys...

In my case I'm kinda used to using the first one, though the only time I used the 2nd one is when Im playing time of your life by green day as the arpeggio sounds better with the 2nd one... I still only knew a few songs (and few w/ open chords) thats why I don't know much, the songs I like listening to are mostly powerchords... Dunno if it's ok for a beginner to jump immediately to powerchords without playing open chords that much but I guess this is a different question...

Thanks guys for answering my question...

IMO it's a waste of your time, because a powerchord is simply the bottom 2/3 notes of a full chord. So if you've learned, for example, an A chord...well, you've already learned how to play an A powerchord, you just play less notes.

Learning powerchords first, then learning open chords is just ass backwards, it's inefficient because you end up wasting effort learning the exact same thing twice over.
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#21
a powerchord is simply the bottom 2/3 notes of a full chord. So if you've learned, for example, an A chord...well, you've already learned how to play an A powerchord, you just play less notes.

Absolutely ridiculous, i believe someone need to rethink their theory strategy, the amount of times you give incorrect information is staggering
#22
isn't a power chord just the root and the fifth? so an a chord you would just e playing A and E?
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#23
Quote by fr0z3n1337
Guys dunno if this has been asked before, but Im a bit confused... What is the correct position of the G major chord?

Is it this one (I mostly used this):



Or this one (But my brother insist that this is the correct one):



Thanks...

I can't believe that most of the people who have responded to this thread are completely wrong.
The correct answer is the 1st diagram, the 2nd diagram is something like a Gmaj add9.
Check out the pictures again and you will see that the open G string is tuned to an A.
#24
Quote by Henry Wilt
I can't believe that most of the people who have responded to this thread are completely wrong.
The correct answer is the 1st diagram, the 2nd diagram is something like a Gmaj add9.
Check out the pictures again and you will see that the open G string is tuned to an A.
I'm kinda wondering if it's just a case of the wrong diagram being put up. The second diagram would be just a simple G major chord, if it were in standard tuning.

I don't think a newcomer is asking a question referencing to G open tuning.

Since this is terribly funny, why don't you lead us out of our ignorance by posting a correct tab for a G major open, 4 finger variation, in standard tuning.

To the OP, the G major open chord version chord played with 4 fingers, contains 3 roots (G note), 2- 5ths (D note) and 1- 3rd (B note. The G major chord played with 3 fingers, contains the same 3 roots (G), but only 1 5th (D), and 2- 3rds (B).

Most people prefer the sound of the 2 5ths version, since it's very close to being a full on, 6 string power chord. The sound is a lot richer, and you already have the D note (3rd fret b-2 string fretted, so the transition to a D Major chord is easier.
#26
Quote by Mad-Mardegan
I usually play the second one.

Not sure why but I prefer the sound and feel of it.
Mute the B on the A-5 string and it becomes a 2 octave power chord (G-5), that's why.
#27
Quote by steven seagull
a powerchord is simply the bottom 2/3 notes of a full chord. So if you've learned, for example, an A chord...well, you've already learned how to play an A powerchord, you just play less notes.

Absolutely ridiculous, i believe someone need to rethink their theory strategy, the amount of times you give incorrect information is staggering

Please demonstrate exactly how a power chord is not simply the bottom 2 or 3 notes of a major or minor chord.
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#28
Quote by pigpoo

Please demonstrate exactly how a power chord is not simply the bottom 2 or 3 notes of a major or minor chord.

Well, a "power chord" is an "x-5" chord. It consists of, (at its most basic) a root note and the 5th of the root note's major scale.

You could have certainly have an "x-5" chord, anywhere on the fretboard.

You could also have multiple roots with multiple 5ths.

Now, it might be a bit silly to call a chord of the 5th at the 15th fret a power chord. On the other hand, if you use a strict definition of a power chord being a 5th chord, you probably could.

As long as you don't play a 3rd and play only a root and a 5th that's an "x-5" chord

So, this is a semantic issue. Especially in light of the fact the a chord is supposed to be a 1st, 3rd, & 5th, which makes a basic triad. A power chord, isn't really a chord at all, but rather a harmonic dyad.

So, I suppose you could limit the term "power chord" to the act of banging on the bottom 3 strings of a guitar all day. Whatever floats your boat.

It isn't the "bottom 2 or 3 notes of a major chord >> musically <<< because the bottom 2 notes of a major chord would be a 1st and a 3rd. The bottom 3 notes (and technically the only 3 notes of a major chord) >> musically << would be a 1st, 3rd, and a 5th. Which I think we've pretty much established isn't a "power chord".

So the standard tuning of the guitar is largely, if not solely responsible for creating, "power chords" in the position they're most often played.

I hope that helps.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 7, 2012,
#29
It doesn't help, because I already know exactly what a powerchord is - i know it's a root and 5th, I know it's not technically a chord and I know it's a dyad. You can have a powerchord anywhere on the fretboard in exactly the same way as you could play an A, D or E or anything shape chord anywhere on the fretboard using a barre if necessary. I never said it was " the bottom three strings of the guitar" - that's you not reading my post properly.

I was simply pointing out that when it comes to learning how to play the guitar the typical shapes you learn for major and minor chords, whether open or barred, already contain the powerchords. I'm perfectly aware that you can play a 3 note triad ordered root third and fifth but in reality we do that very rarely on the guitar, and it's certainly not something you'd get taught before the more traditional chord shapes.

EDIT
Absolutely ridiculous, i believe someone need to rethink their theory strategy, the amount of times you give incorrect information is staggering



hey pigpoo, i've just realised that you only ever seem to post specifically to disagree with something I've said...did I run over your dog or something? Either way you seem to have an issue with

a - reading things properly

and

b - talking out your arse.

I can suggest many resources to help you with the first problem, I'm afraid you're on your own with the second though

sod it, moved to MT -it's 50/50 admittedly but it's more fun here
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#30
I almost never use the first one when I play a G chord... The second version sounds beautiful, and the first one is... meh. In Pink Floyd's Wish you Were Here, he plays that as a chord, not only for the intro, but as a chord itself, and it sound wonderful, and my fingers just snap to that, I always that they are interchangeable though.
#32
I use the second one, mostly - but I do mix it up sometimes. You can pull-off the second string and hammer it back on to get some nice embellishments, and if you're going to walk down the arpeggio of the chord it's usually nice to hit both of those notes on the b-string.
#33
There is no "wrong" G major triad, as long as it contains the notes G B D. Both of the have G B D in them.

I also happen to think that the diagram is incorrect, since the open G string is labelled "A".
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Last edited by Woffelz at Feb 8, 2012,
#34
hey pigpoo, i've just realised that you only ever seem to post specifically to disagree with something I've said...did I run over your dog or something? Either way you seem to have an issue with
a - reading things properly
and
b - talking out your arse.
I can suggest many resources to help you with the first problem, I'm afraid you're on your own with the second though

nothing personal Mr Seagull, it's just that you more than anyone else seem to give out incorrect information.
As far as resources go, you don't have to worry about me, i've written more thesis and arguments about music than you've had hot dinners
#35
Quote by pigpoo


nothing personal Mr Seagull, it's just that you more than anyone else seem to give out incorrect information.
As far as resources go, you don't have to worry about me, i've written more thesis and arguments about music than you've had hot dinners


then actually correct him or stop posting irrelevant information. at this point in the thread you've done nothing but troll a mod, and it's pretty fortunate for you that this isn't a militant forum where that will get you instantly banned.
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#36
Quote by pigpoo
hey pigpoo, i've just realised that you only ever seem to post specifically to disagree with something I've said...did I run over your dog or something? Either way you seem to have an issue with
a - reading things properly
and
b - talking out your arse.
I can suggest many resources to help you with the first problem, I'm afraid you're on your own with the second though

nothing personal Mr Seagull, it's just that you more than anyone else seem to give out incorrect information.
As far as resources go, you don't have to worry about me, i've written more thesis and arguments about music than you've had hot dinners
Actually, you don't even seem to be able to generate a post with the quote function used correctly. IMO, this degrades your credibility severely.

You've have however, managed to convince me at least, that you've been in plenty of arguments
#37
Quote by Captaincranky
Actually, you don't even seem to be able to generate a post with the quote function used correctly. IMO, this degrades your credibility severely.

You've have however, managed to convince me at least, that you've been in plenty of arguments


straw men can't really argue, can they?
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#38
Nice username. What's the saying? Ahh yeah, that's the one, "thick as pig shit."
#39
Quote by RamblinMan2450
I almost never use the first one when I play a G chord... The second version sounds beautiful, and the first one is... meh. In Pink Floyd's Wish you Were Here, he plays that as a chord, not only for the intro, but as a chord itself, and it sound wonderful, and my fingers just snap to that, I always that they are interchangeable though.
I always though that was part of, "Wish You were Here's" charm. The whole pretext is that of an amateur jamming along with the radio. It does explain that voicing of G major open.

Gilmour also uses Em add 9 occasionally, which would be a bear to finger with the D note added. Well, at least for me....
#40
Quote by Captaincranky
Gilmour also uses Em add 9 occasionally, which would be a bear to finger with the D note added. Well, at least for me....

Not really.
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Re. the G chord, I prefer a more spatial quality and sound.
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